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EASA to FAA

Old 13th Nov 2022, 11:24
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EASA to FAA

Hi all,

I currently hold the 14 EASA exam passes and i'm starting the rest of my training soon. I want to obtain a EASA CPL, Multi Engline, IR alongside an FAA ICAO equivalent, but I can't seem to figure out the conversion process as there is a range of different information out there! Is the process quicker/cheaper if I did the EASA licences first and then tried to obtain an FAA one? If I unfreeze my ATPL EASA licence by getting 1500 hours, will the conversion be any different? Any input would be greatly appreciated!

Many thanks
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Old 13th Nov 2022, 19:01
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It's cheaper to train in the US. Assuming you've got an EASA PPL, I would get a 61.75 PPL then do the FAA IR. Then build 50 hours PIC under IFR and convert to an EASA IR by training to proficiency. At some point get the MEP and SEIR>MEIR conversion. Finish with an EASA SE CPL at 200 hours. If you don't have the right to live and work in the US then an FAA CPL is pointless. If you do then part 61 requires 250 hours, part 141 requires 190.
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Old 13th Nov 2022, 20:48
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Thanks @rudestuff, I have an EASA PPL at the moment. I want to obtain an FAA CPL and EASA CPL.

Are you suggesting I get an FAA MEP and IR based on my piggyback licence and then convert them to EASA? What does the conveersion entail? Does it mean I can get an EASA MEIR? I just want to chose the correct path for the quickest and easiest conversion!
Thanks again for the reply!
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Old 17th Nov 2022, 19:30
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I guess you have both passports then. There are a multitude of ways to get both licences when it comes to the order to do things. Flight training is cheaper and faster in the US. Plus there are jobs there. I would suggest you get the FAA 61.75 piggyback certificate thrn a full FAA IR, CPL and Multi add-on, then CFI and CFII. Make getting a job in the US your priority - right now your just need a pulse.

In amongst that training after your FAA IR you can get an EASA SEIR and SECPL if you want to, which will save your ATPL exams from expiry. Then when you get an ATP with a type rating with 500 hours you can do a sim ride for a full ATPL.
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Old 18th Nov 2022, 03:49
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To get a FAA commercial you must hold a FAA PVT. The 61.75 “based on” counts for this purpose. It is just a paper shuffle. Then you would have to do the IR written test and a checkride and the commercial written and a checkride. If you have 1500 hours and an ICAO commercial you can go straight to the FAA ATP MEL by completing an ATP Certificate Training Program which takes about a week, passing the written and passing a checkride. So a question would be how close to 1500 hours are you?
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Old 18th Nov 2022, 12:32
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Originally Posted by rudestuff View Post
If you do then part 61 requires 250 hours, part 141 requires 190.
At least one Part 141 school has been approved for a course reduced to 165 hours.

Don't bother with the restricted US private. Spend the extra money on the FAA medical and the PEP knowledge test and apply for a standard US private under the EU–US conversion agreement. There's no practical test.
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Old 19th Nov 2022, 18:43
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selfin,

Is this the process to which you refer above ?:

https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/.../AC_61-143.pdf

I notice in another document, which I assume also details the process, that a flight review is required of an EU applicant in order to apply for an FAA PPL ?:


3.1.4. The applicant shall complete a flight review with an FAA certified flight instructor who
holds appropriate FAA examining authority, as detailed in the TIP-L.

https://www.faa.gov/aircraft/air_cer...EU_annex_3.pdf

Not being much of a legal mind, I quickly get bogged down in the verbage.

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Old 19th Nov 2022, 20:43
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Originally Posted by selfin View Post
At least one Part 141 school has been approved for a course reduced to 165 hours.

Don't bother with the restricted US private. Spend the extra money on the FAA medical and the PEP knowledge test and apply for a standard US private under the EU–US conversion agreement. There's no practical test.
The 165 hrs or even 190hrs 141 CPL doesn’t get you close to meeting the EASA PIC requirements.
Also a conversion process leads to a “Restricted” PPL in accordance with 61.67
What process are you referring to that does not require a practical test?
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Old 20th Nov 2022, 03:37
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[QUOTE=bafanguy;11333565]selfin,

Is this the process to which you refer above ?:

https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/.../AC_61-143.pdf

I notice in another document, which I assume also details the process, that a flight review is required of an EU applicant in order to apply for an FAA PPL ?:


3.1.4. The applicant shall complete a flight review with an FAA certified flight instructor who
holds appropriate FAA examining authority, as detailed in the TIP-L.
/[QUOTE]

And if they’re going for the instrument rating they need an IPC.
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Old 20th Nov 2022, 08:43
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Originally Posted by B2N2 View Post
What process are you referring to that does not require a practical test?
The EASA FAA Bilateral agreement provides a process to convert an EASA licence (SEP/MEP/Instrument) to a standalone FAA licence. Only Private privileges can be obtained regardless of the level of the EASA licence.

Long story short: The applicant sits the PEP written exam and does a Flight Review, then applies to a FSDO or DPE. If Instrument privileges are desired, the applicant also sits the IEP written and does an IPC. It's explained in AC 61-143 linked above.
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