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ATPL theory questions

Old 13th Sep 2013, 16:21
  #421 (permalink)  
 
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Alew, I agree with Keith. Plus
I know i'm not in the good thread but i need an answer:
PLEASE I think you meant to say too!

However if the question is just asking for a distance then you should just draw a straight line on the chart and using dividers/compasses/rule and the fact 1 degree of latitude = 60 nm you should get around 1080 nm. I do using both the NAT charts both using dividers and the appropriate chart scale and an inch ruler.

So on information provided don't know where the 18 lat difference comes from, sounds rubbish to me.

Last edited by RichardH; 17th Sep 2013 at 06:55.
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Old 30th Sep 2013, 20:50
  #422 (permalink)  
 
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ATPL question :)

Hey guys im stuck here, could you please please help me out with the question,
if possible with explanation how to do it too.

You are flying along the 315* radial from a VOR/DME. On a heading of 310*M and flying a TAS of 450 kt, at 0650 UTC you are 93NM from the DME. At 0655 UTC you hav reach 135 NM from the DME. Variation off the map is 16*E. What is the most likely W/V?

answers
A 005/54
B 165/70
C 105/65
D 180/70 probably correct

Last edited by RussianPilot; 30th Sep 2013 at 20:51.
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Old 1st Oct 2013, 06:21
  #423 (permalink)  
 
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This is what you have:

TAS 450 kts
Groundspeed 504 kts
Drift 5 degrees R

Pick up a flight computer and it will reveal the W/V.

I don't have mine any more (gave up teaching this stuff 18 months ago) but answer D indeed looks a likely candidate.
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Old 1st Oct 2013, 07:19
  #424 (permalink)  
 
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Hey guys im stuck here, could you please please help me out with the question,
if possible with explanation how to do it too.

You are flying along the 315* radial from a VOR/DME. On a heading of 310*M and flying a TAS of 450 kt, at 0650 UTC you are 93NM from the DME. At 0655 UTC you hav reach 135 NM from the DME. Variation off the map is 16*E. What is the most likely W/V?

answers
A 005/54
B 165/70
C 105/65
D 180/70 probably correct
Hello. I have done some calculations. My Result is a little bit different from all answers.

In the first stage, you disregard variation, because VOR radials are magnetic bearings and your heading is also magnetic. So the angle of heading 5 degrees to the left from your track. Your GS can be obtained from time and DME: 5 minutes = 42 NM -> 1 minute = 42/5 = 8.4 -> 60 minutes = 504 KTS.

From here you work with a Cosine sentence:
c^2=a^2+b^2-2*a*b*cos(Gamma)

you fill in:
a:450
b:504
Gamma: 5 degrees

you get C = 68 kts - wind velocity.

if you have this, you use Sine sentence:
a/sine(Alpha) = b/ sine(Beta)

you fill in:
a: 68
b: 450
Alpha: 5 degrees

Then you get angle of 35 degrees.
This is the angle, which is added to your track, from where the wind is blowing. So, if you add 35 to 315, you get wind blowing to 350, from 170.
Wind is 170/68 Magnetic, if you add variation, you get final wind blowing 186/68.

Please, someone, correct me if I`m wrong.
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Old 1st Oct 2013, 09:08
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As Lightning Mate said pick up a flight computer and it's a lot easier than cosines and sines.

To work out W/V you need heading, track/course, TAS & GS - basic triangle of velocities stuff just asked in a more practical manner.

GS = 42 NM in 5 mins = 504 kts.

In this case as both heading and track were magnetic work in magnetic on the CRP-5 and get a magnetic wind of 170/70 then ADD the variation back in to get true W/V 186/70 so D.

If you have a mixture of true and magnetic I would always work in true.

Gross error check - wind blows from heading to track so W/V must have a southerly element in this case, rules out answer A to start with.
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Old 1st Oct 2013, 14:13
  #426 (permalink)  
 
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Why do some people make the solution to a simple problem so difficult ?
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 14:41
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Principle of Flight

Hi Guys,

can anyone recommend me a good free online source to study for the Principle of Flight exam?

Thanks
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 15:42
  #428 (permalink)  
 
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Try your approved school - that's what you are paying them for.

Some while ago I worked for the CAA on the PoF CQB.

I have a whole collection of questions.
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Old 21st Oct 2013, 17:04
  #429 (permalink)  
 
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I am doing the atplonline QB at the moment and my distance learning provider has not the best material online. I thought someone can point me in the right direction. Preferable key facts especially about high speed aerodynamics.
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Old 23rd Oct 2013, 17:46
  #430 (permalink)  
 
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Pittslover,

While not directly satisfying your request I will nevertheless recommend HH Hurt's classic Aerodynamics for Naval Aviators. The FAA hosts a PDF copy, not under US domestic copyright protection, here: http://www.faa.gov/regulations_polic.../00-80T-80.pdf

Although reading this from cover to cover will be overkill for ATPL PoF exam purposes, it is sufficiently simple to supplement learning without requiring much prior knowledge.
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Old 7th Nov 2013, 15:54
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met doubt : explanation for question

hi, i have a question from met, I want to know if the explanation is correct.
if an aircraft in northern hemisphere flies from high to low, it will experience _________ drift
ans. starboard

explanation: if winds are from left, then it will experience right drift, it is because aircraft is flying towards ( or in the) low pressure, so the winds will be from left. hence starboard drift.
rule applied is coriolis force.
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Old 7th Nov 2013, 17:02
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Do a search for Ballots law.
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Old 7th Nov 2013, 18:39
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All fluids tend to flow from areas of high pressure to areas of lower pressure. But because of the rotation of the Earth, Coriolis effect causes the wind to circulate around areas of high and low pressure. The direction of this circulation is depends on the location (northern or southern hemisphere), and whether the area is one of high or low pressure. The outcome of these effects is predicted by Buys Ballotís Law, which states that when standing with oneís back to the wind, the low pressure area is on your left.

If an aeroplane is subjected to a crosswind it will drift in the direction of that wind. In this question the aeroplane is drifting to the right, so the wind must be coming from its left side. Applying Buys Ballotís law this means that the aeroplane in this question must be flying towards the area of low pressure.

If you need a more detailed explanation you should read up on coriolis effect, which is part of the ATPL Met syllabus.
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Old 8th Nov 2013, 06:32
  #434 (permalink)  
 
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thank you!
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Old 8th Nov 2013, 11:38
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If in doubt, draw it out!
 
Old 8th Nov 2013, 11:47
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Smile

yes, thank you very much!
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Old 8th Nov 2013, 15:30
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From memory Tx means braking action...
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Old 15th Nov 2013, 17:08
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Polar Stereographic Chart

HI

Can anyone please tell me if questions on the Polar Stereographic chart are still being asked in the ATPL Gen Nav exam?

Hearing that it has been taken out of the syllabus?

Cheers
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Old 15th Nov 2013, 19:26
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Yes they are still there in GN and questions are asked.
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Old 16th Nov 2013, 07:46
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Thanks for this Richard..

Cheers
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