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ATPL theory questions

Old 4th Feb 2014, 05:40
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Require some help

Hi,

I am trying to revise for flight planning and mass and balance. I seem to come across quite a number of LRJT questions on question bank. Although I have been told they are unlikely to appear in the exam. Is there any truth to that. Anyone recently sat the exam and had such questions asked.

Secondly although I am trying to read materials provided on running load and distribution load but I am still encountering problems grasping the principle and if someone can provide help with that. It will be much appreciated.
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Old 4th Feb 2014, 07:05
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This post might be better in ATPL theory questions forum.

LRJT certainly have/are been asked.
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Old 4th Feb 2014, 10:46
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Use 50 nm instead of 30 nm. 2700 is correct for 30 nm, but the question is confusing.
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Old 4th Feb 2014, 16:42
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two aircraft intercepting

hello guys.
would really really appreciate it if someone on pprune could help me with the solution to this problem on navigation

**) aircraft takes off from 00 N 170 W at 2100 LMT on 21/12/99 at a ground speed of 300 knots. .Another aircraft takes off from 15 N 165 E on 22/12/99 at 2100 LMT to intercept the first aircraft.Find

a) time of interception
b) ground speed of second aircraft

please please help me with the solution to this problem. would really appreciate your time and help
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Old 5th Feb 2014, 10:17
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Torque

Which of the following is not and active force on the aircraft? lift,weight, thrust, drag, torque?
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Old 6th Feb 2014, 03:25
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flight planning

If CAS is 190 kts, Altitude 9000 ft. Temp. ISA - 10C, True Course (TC) 350, W/V 320/40, distance from departure to destination is 350 NM, endurance 3 hours and actual time of departure is 1105 UTC. The distance from departure to Point of Equal Time (PET)

9000ft/ISA -10⁰C (OAT= -13⁰C) TAS =212 kt D = 350 NM O = 176 kt H =246kt Distance to PET = D x H / (O + H). = 350 x 246 / (176 + 246) = 204 NM

Answer 203nm


I am unsure about the temprature corrrection as i get is -7 { 15 - (9 x 2) }= 3 and -10 =-7
can someone just explain this -10 or +10 isa and correction made accordingly please
thank you in advance.

Last edited by clkorm3; 6th Feb 2014 at 04:59.
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Old 6th Feb 2014, 18:16
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ISA at 9000ft is -3, however the question states ISA -10 which means the ambient OAT is 10 COLDER than -3 so should be using -13 to get your TAS of about 214 its.

If it had said ISA +10 then your +10-3 = +7.

Understanding these corrections is an important skill for a number of the subjects.
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Old 7th Feb 2014, 17:10
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Thank you.
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Old 7th Feb 2014, 17:39
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How did I pass myATPL writtens....

I have no idea how I managed to pass my ATPL written papers.


All I can say is please do not ask me any of the questions as shown above, I have wasted 1/2 day trying to get even one right.


Perhaps 45 years ago I was just clever, but now stupid.
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 02:25
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You have a crate of mass 174 kg with dimensions of 1ft 3in x 1ft 9in x 2ft 4 in. What are the distribution and linear loads?

79.81 kg/sq.ft and 8.28 kg/in

can someone please help me break this down as i get different answer when i work out longest side for running load answer
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 07:19
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Purpose of finding pressure height and density height

Hi,
I know how to find the pressure height but I dont fully understand the reason for finding it. I know that it has to do with the performance of the aircraft and terrain clearance, and also to know the take off distance. Can someone kindly explain to me the purpose of finding these two?
I am a noob
Cheers
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 07:47
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Say you have a mountain that is 6000 feet high and you want to land your helicopter on it. Assuming you know what ISA conditions are (as a noob ), in ISA conditions, your machine would think it was landing at 6000 feet. But say the QNH was 995 instead of 1013. There is an 18 mb difference which translates to roughly 540 feet. Now your machine thinks it is at 6540 feet, and the engine and rotors (or wings) have to work just that bit harder (in these types of questions, draw a diagram and place the larger pressures at the bottom).

Now let's look at the temperature. The ISA temperature at that height should be around 3 degrees C - but say it's actually 15 degrees - it is warmer than it should be by 12 degrees and the air is thinner (less dense), so your machine has to work harder still because it thinks it is another 1400 or so feet higher - actually around 8000 feet.

To find out density altitude, take the ISA temperature difference, multiply it by 120 and add or subtract it to the PA.
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 08:10
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We use it to calculate performance related stuff such as take off distance, and landing distance.

At my organization, we use the pressure alt at our aerodrome to calculate the take off and landing distance for our aircraft, and add a 15 percent safety factor.
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 08:34
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N5748E

Unfortunately ISA figures are only theoretical, in practise you will hardly be flying at altitudes or places where ISA conditions are present, personally I have been doing a lot of flying from a coastal Aerodrome, never experienced ISA conditions.
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 09:28
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I know. It's never an ISA day...
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 09:34
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Just get the airport elevation, the forecasted QNH, for e.g. at my airport today, the QNH was 996hpa, and airport elevation was 55ft. Gives u a pressure alt of 563ft.

Go to your POH and use the charts in section 5, performance, remembering the temperature as well...
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 09:36
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clkorm3 - first work out the load intensity:

174 kg/(1.25 ft x 1.75ft) = 79.5 kg/sq. ft.

(Note that this answer is given in feet so you must convert from inches to feet.)

If you take the longest length according to the first part of the answer, you must calculate the running load with a length of 1 ft 9 in rather than the 2 ft 4 in. In this case, your answer has to be in inches, rather than feet.

Running load: 174 kg/1 ft 9 in= 174 kg/21 inches = 8.23 kg/in.

I'm not sure if you had other answers to select from as you can definitely choose a better configuration of running load and intensity by working with the 2 ft 4 in length. Maybe all the other answers had incorrect units or scaling?
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 14:04
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They just needed a datum to refer and compare to so they could write the performance charts. Without a starting reference, it would be a complete mess.

The fact that it's never an ISA day is irrelevant.
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 14:57
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thank you that was very helpful.
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Old 15th Feb 2014, 17:18
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You also mention the reason finding Density Altitude (you said height, but meant Altitude)

This is used to correct the readings from an airspeed indicator to give the true airspeed of the aircraft.

The steps are:

Indicated Airspeed (subject to instrument and position error)

Calibrated Airspeed (subject to Compressibility error)

Equivalent airspeed (subject to density error)

True Airspeed (once you've factored IAS for all the above errors)
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