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Horrible instructor!

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Horrible instructor!

Old 28th Sep 2020, 09:13
  #61 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by BDAttitude View Post
So my question the audience is:
Is this a personal thing, that I am sort of insensitive of learning by feeling the control inputs of another person?
Or is it generally useless to do so?
Me too. I found that for me not only is it intensely annoying, it is also useless from a teaching point of view. I cannot tell you if he thought I was high/low, fast/slow when he intervened on the throttle, so zero learning took place.
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Old 28th Sep 2020, 09:18
  #62 (permalink)  
 
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The audio channel would be much more effective
Same for me. And if no audio available, then pointing a finger can be just as effective.
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Old 28th Sep 2020, 10:50
  #63 (permalink)  
 
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then pointing a finger can be just as effective.
There seem to be two schools of thought on that. I've heard opinion that you should never point, but I find that often students shut down their hearing and I refuse to shout. Just pointing at the altimeter or airspeed can produce better results.

TOO
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Old 28th Sep 2020, 11:15
  #64 (permalink)  
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Early in my training, during a go-around, I went to raise the flaps too soon. The instructor said 'wait', then touched the VSI and said 'positive rate', touched the ASI and said '60 kn, now you can raise the flaps'. I found that touching of the dials very effective in fixing the message in my head.
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Old 28th Sep 2020, 15:36
  #65 (permalink)  
 
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I had the immense displeasure experience of flying with a PPL instructor that abused, ridiculed and swore at the student even before line up! In the air is was non stop. A total psychopath! But so many thought his arse was made of gold. It made me puke! This should have been the subject of many CRM courses. Anyway, when I eventually broached the subject with him he offered to go outside for a punch-up! At that point the flying club had lost me and I went elsewhere. That was 35 years ago. This maniac is still instructing!!! How??? But that was at least the beginning and end of his career. If you are in the south of UK you probably know him? He is infamous!
I went on to a commercial career flying jet command all over the world.
There are all sorts in this business but dear God I hope never to meet his kind again. He should have been killed at birth!

Last edited by Kelly Hopper; 28th Sep 2020 at 15:49.
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Old 28th Sep 2020, 16:44
  #66 (permalink)  
 
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There are all sorts in this business
There are all sorts around, yes, Still, if you feel you are above some - quite literally, here - then there are more gentle expressions available. Often, these are more effective, especially if one wants to illustrate superiority.

And by the way, please leave your deity/deities out - we're talking private flying here, normally not even extending into stratosphere, much less beyond.
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 14:12
  #67 (permalink)  
 
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Its such a headache dealing with a horrible instructor
on the other hand - "talk to me goose" is an adaptive statement, can i borrow it hahaha
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 15:31
  #68 (permalink)  
 
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I was taught early in my career ... "There's one in every bunch of twelve" It's true for any walk of life I've found
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 15:58
  #69 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by FantomZorbin View Post
I was taught early in my career ... "There's one in every bunch of twelve" It's true for any walk of life I've found
And when the 1 student in 12 meets the 1 instructor in 12 (which I reckon will happen in 0.7% of such pairings), you have a real disaster on your hands.
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 21:19
  #70 (permalink)  
 
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One of the lessons I took onboard during my training is that calm is just as infectious as panic. I flew with both nervous and bomb proof instructors, and I figured out later on who I'd much rather fly with. I flew with a nervous instructor just after my first solo so knowing for certainty I was capable of flying the aircraft meant I felt better about my flying, but I note from my logbook I didn't get much solo time after flying dual with them.
The story about a bomb proof instructor (a former Ag pilot) was one day we were doing circuit training at a small country airstrip, I'd landed long and had my eyes inside the cockpit fumbling for the flap lever. He nonchalantly looked over at me and drawled in a calm matter of fact tone, "Flyinkiwi, if you don't go around right now we are going to go through the fence." He certainly got my attention back to where it should have been all along!
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Old 29th Sep 2020, 22:45
  #71 (permalink)  
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in a calm matter of fact tone, "Flyinkiwi, if you don't go around right now we are going to go through the fence." He certainly got my attention back to where it should have been all along!
A few calm, well placed words will be much more usefully memorable, than any kind of panicked behaviour. The calm, well placed words can also teach that even in impending danger, the calm action will work out best, so do it that way....
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Old 30th Sep 2020, 10:47
  #72 (permalink)  
 
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I did my PPL in the mid 60s, all the instructors were horrible, shouty, pimply, halitosis and no interest except for a log book entry. Never a briefing or debriefing. worse was the office staff who let you stand at the counter while they had a chat. That was and still is the RVAC.
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Old 30th Sep 2020, 18:22
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It seems clear that "Aust", wherever that may be, is (or at least "was") not a good place to (learn to) be a private pilot. How sad to have to live there ;( Could you get over it?

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Old 30th Sep 2020, 22:06
  #74 (permalink)  
 
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Jan,
Check this out:


We Brits refer to it as 'down under'. Discovered by the Dutch (your neighbours) in 1606..

TOO
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Old 30th Sep 2020, 22:44
  #75 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Jan Olieslagers View Post
It seems clear that "Aust", wherever that may be, is (or at least "was") not a good place to (learn to) be a private pilot. How sad to have to live there ;( Could you get over it?
I also learnt to fly in Australia in the mid-60s, at Geelong, and fondly recall all of my instructors especially the CFI, Aub Coote, who later taught me aerobatics. I did some flying with Roy Goon when he was at the Royal Victorian Aero Club (RVAC), top guy as were other instructors I knew there. Every time I entered RVAC over the years until earlier this year I'd either go to the counter where Helen or one of the others would look after me promptly OR I would sit down/stand around waiting for the person expecting me. I understand the problem as I have been ignored at shop counters on too many occasions - I never return.

Of course, I have encountered quite a few instructors over the years that I would never recommend to anyone. A small number I would classify as "horrible", unfortunately some are still around, occasionally changing flight schools - I know of a few examples where they have been told to move on. I advise potential students to "interview" instructors before choosing a school to learn at and they should get to choose the instructor.
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Old 30th Sep 2020, 23:02
  #76 (permalink)  
 
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I though 'Aust' was on the opposite bank of the River Severn to Beachley Head?

for those who don't remember that old ferry! Filmed shortly before the Severn Bridge opened in 1966.
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 08:25
  #77 (permalink)  
 
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Nice Mark 1 Cortina. In '65 mine here in Blighty was a 1963 C reg model with powerful 1198 eager cc's up front.
Australia, Mascot airfield, used to be Sydney's main airport & where in '69 my PPL began with C150 plus a correspondence course. l still have it for reference!

Both there and home here at Shoreham l found learning with the mix of different instructors available on the day was quite enjoyable and productive.
Perhaps l was lucky ?
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Old 1st Oct 2020, 18:44
  #78 (permalink)  
 
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he was my favourite miniature poodle
[[ FULLY-OFF-TOPIC WARNING ]]
The only right place for small dogs and other mammifers is on a spit over a slow fire, barbecue or not. Best of all if you can first marinade them for a night or two, in red wine, vinegar, bit of oil, carrots, garlic, onions, &c &c

Perhaps not the worst option for certain instructors, either [to remain on topic, even if slightly]
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Old 2nd Oct 2020, 08:41
  #79 (permalink)  
 
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Jan Olieslaggers , what a horrible thing to post.

Poodles are, in fact, some of the most loyal, loving and intelligent little dogs there are.

As for instructors, it would appear that there are some who should never be allowed near an ATO/DTO.
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Old 10th Oct 2020, 05:14
  #80 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by double_barrel View Post
I'm flying again tomorrow, I will try to take some pics, then we can play guess where I am!

Happily this thread has drifted nicely!

Meanwhile I have done a bit of flying in their a/c and plan a lot more. The flying is fantastic. Wx and scenery are amazing. I am often the only a/c on any given frequency, so I get undivided attention from friendly and helpful ATCs - even though I sometimes have to wake them from a siesta.

As promised, here are some pictures to warm-up you folk in a grey autumnal UK. A virtual beer to anyone who can identify the location(s)




I can't seem to make thumbnails that link to full size images. You can get to the the pictures here: https://imgbox.com/LvvvHSpB



One thing that really strikes me is how incredibly stable the a/c is while over the sea. Especially on a hot day, I am used to very bumpy air. But over the sea it is rock steady; I can trim it and not touch anything for minutes on end. There is always a 10-15Kn breeze blowing from the ocean, that makes for some interesting effects on land with powerful up and down drafts around hills, and general bumpiness over any features, but over the sea it's perfectly calm.

Last edited by double_barrel; 10th Oct 2020 at 07:53.
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