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EASA PPL (and NPPL?) License Application Query...

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EASA PPL (and NPPL?) License Application Query...

Old 18th Sep 2020, 01:13
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Join Date: Nov 2019
Location: UK
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EASA PPL (and NPPL?) License Application Query...

Hi all,

I've completed my EASA PPL training and in the process of applying online to the CAA for my license issue. One of the options in the application page is confusing me however, as it asks the following:

"Do you have a UK National type rating for which you need a UK PPLA National aeroplane licence in addition to this EASA licence (additional fee applies)?"

I've tried to find out more about what this actually is offering me, and from what little (confusing) info I have found, it is essentially offering the option of a national license IN ADDITION to the PPL that would cover non-EASA aircraft that require a type rating. Can anyone confirm this?


I'm also unsure as to whether I really need it, or even if I dont need it right now is it worth being issued in a "better to have and not need" way incase I fly an aircraft type that needs it down the line?

Apologies if this seems like a stupid question but the licensing rules really do seem quite confusing.

Thanks!
thelowflyer is offline  
Old 18th Sep 2020, 03:29
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You don't need it.

It's primary purpose was to hold weird ratings that were available/required to fly certain non-EASA aircraft. I can't remember exactly what aircraft or ratings needed it but a bog standard EASA PPL(A) with an SEP rating is good enough for most of us. Many of us ticked that box when 'converting' to EASA, mainly because at the time it was free & how often do you get something from the CAA for free? The result is I now have three licences, a 90's era CAA PPL, an EASA PPL & another CAA PPL. In reality I only use the EASA PPL & only bother to get the EASA PPL signed when revalidating my ratings. Once the UK leaves EASA your UK issued EASA PPL(A) will become a non-EASA ICAO compliant UK PPL(A).
Prop swinger is offline  
Old 18th Sep 2020, 07:27
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For the OP's sake, let's hope you're right.
MrAverage is offline  
Old 18th Sep 2020, 16:39
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Join Date: Oct 2014
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I have four licences: three NPPLs and a LAPL. I only use the LAPL at the moment but I'd rather have the NPPL and not need it than need it and not have it.
MaxR is offline  
Old 18th Sep 2020, 18:55
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I have an EASA PPL and a CAA UK PPL (NOT an NPPL.). Both issued on the basis of an old CAA PPL, which did not have to be surrendered.
There are some different privelages.
This is different from what I think you are asking about.
Maoraigh1 is offline  
Old 19th Sep 2020, 00:05
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Join Date: Oct 2004
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"Do you have a UK National type rating for which you need a UK PPLA National aeroplane licence
This is not a NPPL! If you are applying for the initial issue of a PPL it is highly improbable that you would hold a National Type rating which would have to be part of an existing licence!

If you held a professional licence and were converting to a Part FCL licence then the offer of retaining or acquiring a National Licence might be a very worthwhile option in these uncertain times and the cost of no consequence. When converting to an EASA licence I acquired a lifetime UK ATPL for 40, good value at any time.

The issue of National Licences which are listed in the ANO Schedule 8 is often resisted by the CAA however; Article 152 is quite clear:
Grant, renewal and privileges of United Kingdom flight crew licences

152.—(1) Subject to article 172, the CAA or a person approved by the CAA for that purpose must grant licences of any of the classes specified in Part 1 of Schedule 8, authorising the holder to act as a member of the flight crew of a non-EASA aircraft registered in the United Kingdom, if it is satisfied that the applicant is—
(a) a fit person to hold the licence; and
(b) qualified by having the knowledge, experience, competence, skill and physical and mental fitness to act in the capacity to which the licence relates.
If they don't issue one the applicant has a right of apeal under CAA regulation 6.

Whopity is offline  
Old 19th Sep 2020, 09:14
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As far as I understand you need a Class 2 medical for a PPL while you can self certify on a NPPL.
The NPPL is only valid in country of issue so depends if you are wanting to fly in Europe (a few countries have reciprocal NPPL agreements I believe)
Greek God is offline  
Old 26th Sep 2020, 12:09
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Join Date: Oct 2004
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As far as I understand you need a Class 2 medical for a PPL while you can self certify on a NPPL.
You need a Class II for the issue of a PPL but you can use it with a Medical Dec under specified conditions which will confine you to the UK.
The use of NPPLs in other countries is largely confined to Microlights where different countries have different non EASA rules that are not discimilar to the UK requirements for Microlights.
Whopity is offline  
Old 26th Sep 2020, 18:51
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Slight thread drift. A friend let his LAPL currency lapse, so is undergoing retraining. His instructor questioned his licence, because of no mention of day VFR only.
He is a low hours pilot, with no ambition for anything other than day VFR, and had accepted what the CAA issued.
Has LAPL wording changed?
Maoraigh1 is offline  
Old 26th Sep 2020, 20:05
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Join Date: Mar 2016
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All of the above is fine and dandy but.... If you are being offered another licence, then take it. The cost will be negligible and the potential benefit unknown but possibly worth having in these uncertain times.

For clarity, and as Whopity says, you are being offered an ICAO-compliant UK PPL, not an NPPL. ICAO-compliant licences of various flavours are valuable things and you can never have too many, especially in these uncertain times.
Kemble Pitts is offline  
Old 27th Sep 2020, 16:47
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Join Date: May 2001
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High time the whole issue of licences was simplified. PPL, ATPL- frozen for experience and full ATPL. Likewise too many complicated medical categories.
beamer is offline  
Old 27th Sep 2020, 18:25
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Join Date: Oct 2004
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A frozen ATPL is not a licence, at best its a promise!
Whopity is offline  
Old 28th Sep 2020, 11:04
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His instructor questioned his licence, because of no mention of day VFR only.
Unless a night rating is included, any LAPL is only valid day VFR so why would there be an extra endorsement to that effect? Ten years into the wonderful world of EASA there is a significant number of instructors that have never seen an LAPL and even more who don't understand it.
BillieBob is offline  

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