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Can I fly an airplane in the UK with an FAA PPL?

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Can I fly an airplane in the UK with an FAA PPL?

Old 21st Jan 2019, 01:27
  #41 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Barbados
Posts: 348
I am still as confused about this as I was two years ago.

In October 2017, with the info here I visited Earls Colne - I am an FAA PPL and I would like to rent on of your airplanes, a PA28 I own one and have lots of recent time.

They referred me to their expert CFI, who informed me that no I could not rent one of their airplanes and that my licence and experience were woryhless, I would need to do their PPL course etc etc. he even gave me the 40 hours nonsense.

Anyway I am going over in May - past the Brexit date and the April thing.

So can I solo anywhere in the UK, not fussed if G or N registered.

After all the guff last time that resulted in a wasted trip - I am looking for an actual airplane, location, contact name, email, phone number so I can set it up in advance
Ebbie 2003 is offline  
Old 21st Jan 2019, 08:40
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
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I wonder if the way round this is to make contact with an owner of an FAA registered aircraft here in the UK? There are around 200 such aircraft over here with the Cirrus SR20/22 being the most numerous. Equally there are a number of high end Biz jets - how's your G6 type rating

But there are quite a number of Pipers and Cessnas around - my own field has a C182 based for instance.

Place to ask is https://forums.flyer.co.uk/viewforum.php?f=1 along with this thread.

Or just ask Sam Rutherford......
ETOPS is offline  
Old 21st Jan 2019, 09:19
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Uxbridge
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We have an Archer II with Garmin 750 and G5. However, there is a process you need to go through to validate your FAA licence to rent the aircraft. It's a little known fact that validation is still required even on N reg aircraft. This process is not quick. You would need to start soon. Please send me a PM..............
MrAverage is offline  
Old 22nd Jan 2019, 11:16
  #44 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lancashire & Florida
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Ebbie I have just spent the last 6 months jumping through the hoops in order to validate my FAA PPL to fly in the UK.

1. I had to take the UK Air law exam - a week of study saw me through that one.
2. Next up was the Human Performance exam - again with a little study time it really wasn't an issue,
Both exams are choosing from multi choice questions, and frankly if you can't get enough correct to score a pass, then you shouldn't be flying !!
So you'll have nothing to worry about there. For tuition I used ppltutor.com
Next up was submit form SRG2140 plus copies of my log book and FAA licence and my FAA class 3 medical cert (all copies certified by a CAA DPE) to the CAA.

I submitted everything at the beginning of October 2018, I received an email at the beginning of December asking me to submit the most recent page of my log book again,( it appears they could not find the original copy I sent in) anyway I sent off another certified copy and followed that up with a phone call to ask how long it would now take to process my validation. The reply I got was they are working approx 4 weeks behind from date of recieving applications, when I said I sent my paperwork in at the beginning of October which was almost 8 weeks back, they said due to me having to submit more info (lost log book page) it re-sets the clock so it would take approx another 4 weeks to process.

Early January I finally recieved an email from the CAA confiming my FAA cert is validated and I am now free to fly in the UK (G-Reg VFR daytime only, N-Reg no restrictions as long as I'm current in type)
The only downside now is the declaration is only valid unit 8th April 2019 or the implementation of the BASA agreement, whichever comes first.

So what happens after the 8th April is unknown at this point in time, maybe there will be an extension maybe not ?
Also to add to my frustrations my Flight Review is now due, which I'm now busy organising a suitable mutual schedule with a UK based FAA CFI to get that knocked out.

In retrospect for me as I'm now going to be based in the UK more than in the US I should have just worked on converting to a EASA cert. Maybe come the summer thats the route I'll go.

I will say, I'm not knocking the CAA in any way, whoever I've spoken with there have always tried to help me and been polite and understanding to my needs. I believe they are under staffed and under much pressure with the uncertainty over Brexit. I'm sure they have much more pressing things to sort out than a few of us foreign certificate PPL drivers who want to invade their airspace.

Last edited by alland2012; 22nd Jan 2019 at 15:58.
alland2012 is offline  
Old 22nd Jan 2019, 13:01
  #45 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Uk
Age: 57
Posts: 3
Originally Posted by Ebbie 2003 View Post
I am still as confused about this as I was two years ago.

In October 2017, with the info here I visited Earls Colne - I am an FAA PPL and I would like to rent on of your airplanes, a PA28 I own one and have lots of recent time.

They referred me to their expert CFI, who informed me that no I could not rent one of their airplanes and that my licence and experience were woryhless, I would need to do their PPL course etc etc. he even gave me the 40 hours nonsense.
This is a bit of a moving target, but AIUI there are currently multiple options.
1. Convert to a Euro Licence. This is IMHO the worst option unless you live here and/or plan to fly a lot. Again, various options:
a) UK NPPL (ask the LAA for details, but I think they assess your experience and come up with a differences training plan)
b) EASA PPL. You need a minimum of 100 hours total time, plus a (Euro I think) class II medical.
2. Validate your licence. Google SRG2140 and possibly SRG2142.
3. Fly UK registered (sometime called permit aircraft) on your FAA licence. Not many of these available to rent. If you are ok with tail draggers, try the Tiger Club.
4. Possibly some other options I can't remember.
Note that if you intend to use the Radio, you will need an Aircraft Radio Licence (Google FRTOL)

That's my understanding...
Grelly is offline  
Old 22nd Jan 2019, 14:11
  #46 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 1999
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Hold on a minute. If an American pilot with an FAA licence flys into the U.K. in his N reg aircraft he doesn't run to the CAA for a validation. How do all those biz jets arriving at Biggin etc manage to take off without going through this 6 month process.

I think Ebbie should just turn up with his FAA licence and fly a "friendly" N reg aircraft with its owner....
ETOPS is offline  
Old 22nd Jan 2019, 15:42
  #47 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Uk
Age: 57
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Originally Posted by ETOPS View Post
Hold on a minute. If an American pilot with an FAA licence flys into the U.K. in his N reg aircraft he doesn't run to the CAA for a validation. How do all those biz jets arriving at Biggin etc manage to take off without going through this 6 month process.

I think Ebbie should just turn up with his FAA licence and fly a "friendly" N reg aircraft with its owner....
I haven't looked at this option recently. I seem to remember that EASA wanted you to have both FAA and EASA licences, but I may be wrong. As you say, pilots with international qualifications do arrive and depart every day, so there must be a way.
Grelly is offline  
Old 22nd Jan 2019, 18:49
  #48 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Quite near 'An aerodrome somewhere in England'
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Unfortunately, because of the absurd UK/EU exit nonsense brought about by those fools who voted to leave the EU, the DfT now has to look at other options for 3rd country licence holders flying in the UK, rather than those of the derogations available under the recent Regulation (EU) 2018/1974.

The long-awaited EU/US BASA is also in doubt, thanks to the current situation...
BEagle is offline  
Old 22nd Jan 2019, 23:31
  #49 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Europe
Posts: 5,766
Article 150 allows you to exercise the privileges of an FAA licence on a Annex 1 aircraft i.e a non EASA aircraft.
Deeming a non-United Kingdom flight crew licence and any Part-FCL licence valid for non-EASA aircraft registered in the United Kingdom and deeming a non-United Kingdom radiotelephony licence valid for any aircraft
150.—(1) Subject to paragraph (2), this article applies to any licence which authorises the holder to act as a member of the flight crew of an aircraft and is—
(a) granted under the law of a Contracting State other than the United Kingdom but which is not a Part-FCL licence;
To fly an EASA aircraft you will need to compete SRG 2140 and comply with the notes attached to that form.

N reg aircraft operating into the UK fall into a totally different category as they are not based in Europe.
Whopity is offline  
Old 23rd Jan 2019, 20:01
  #50 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Moray,Scotland,U.K.
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May be useful to mention that C172 and Pa28 (etc) are EASA aircraft, as a non-EU pilot might think otherwise.
Maoraigh1 is offline  

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