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Post PPL confidence

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Post PPL confidence

Old 7th Jan 2015, 14:01
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 162
@StepTurn: But I will never again be "UI", as I know what my responsibilities are for operation of an aircraft


I disagree. If you step into a 737 you don't know what you don't know. Maybe the on board computer needs to be in mode X with setting Y etc.

For all the known stuff (flap selection, speeds, performance, etc) you are indeed CI, but for all the unknown stuff (and therefor for flying the 737 in general) you're UI. Not knowing what you need to know is UI

(assuming you're not type rated on a 737 of course, as we're talking in the private flying part)
Pirke is offline  
Old 7th Jan 2015, 14:29
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: LHTL
Posts: 204
I'm just coming to terms with the fact that I'll soon be making all the decisions for myself and there will no longer be a knowledgable passenger sat next to me in times of uncertainty.
You already had this situation during your solo flights, as part of your training.
As long as you keep on learning, rather than unlearning, in your upcoming flights, and gauge your capabilities conservatively, you will be OK, and self confidence will come.

Interestingly, I was happy when I could start flying alone, and I made a lot of effort into maintaining my currency so as to avoid sitting with instructors again. Of course, I did talk to them, I even had a check-ride due to starting to rent planes from a new place. Nevertheless, I don't even like other pilots joining me either in the right seat. I happily join other pilots in the right seat and enjoy being passanger again, but in my right seat, I prefer another passanger or being empty. Probably because it gives me the chance to learn faster, more, deeper, than having someone helping, yet at the same time preventing mistakes in the first place.

Just make sure you have a little book in your flight suit, where you can pencil down your own de-briefs from your flight - what did you learn, what you should focus on during next flights.
rnzoli is offline  
Old 7th Jan 2015, 14:32
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Wales
Posts: 541
Hi Bluejays, welcome to GA Flying...
I think at an early stage you need to get your Navigation simplified as much as possible. Try some trips out where the nav is simple, along a coast-line for example. Or around areas that are instantly recognisable to you, such as past tall smoking chimneys etc. There are lots of good airfields to go to that are still within class G airspace.
I am not too sure how much GPS training is given in todays PPL courses, but a good GPS or ipad app is one of the first purchases, along with a good head-set.
phiggsbroadband is offline  
Old 7th Jan 2015, 15:48
  #24 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Twickenham, home of rugby
Posts: 6,600
1. You're not aware that you can't do it properly
2. You're aware that you can't do it properly
3. You still think you can't do it properly, while you're actually able to do it properly
4. You know you're able to do it properly
It's actually:

3. You can do it, but you have to think about it to do it properly
4. You can do it properly without thinking about it.

SD
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Old 7th Jan 2015, 16:14
  #25 (permalink)  
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Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Devon, UK
Posts: 192
I was / am in this position, I am dealing with it thus;
  • Started with a few local flights in varying conditions
  • Added a little difficulty by taking longer trips, having to concentrate for longer
  • Added some beacon tracking to a route
  • Started taking trips out of the local area or to areas I had never been to
  • Next up is to land away somewhere I have never been to
  • Then a land away via complicated airspace
I have already had some good decision making experience; setting off on a navex when the METAR gave 9999 but once airborne I found I could not see much due to haze under an inversion, assessed for a minute, back to tower and landed, 0.3 and no harm done.

For me the key is not to try and do too much too quickly, confidence is built slowly and knocked down quickly.

And don't forget, it is supposed to be fun
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Old 7th Jan 2015, 19:11
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Toronto
Posts: 302
Tall bloke's last sentence is very important.

I wondered if I was losing my confidence and excessively limiting the conditions I would fly in.

then I realized that yes, I'm doing this for fun. Fighting with gusty winds and mechanical turbulence, for me, isn't fun. I suspect it is even less fun for my passengers.

So I don't fly in it if I can help it.
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Old 7th Jan 2015, 21:46
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 602
If you step into a 737 you don't know what you don't know. Maybe the on board computer needs to be in mode X with setting Y etc.
I thought about this for a bit, but generally stand by my position. I know that the certified airliner is required to not require unusual pilot skill or attention to fly. So a non trained pilot would really struggle, and likely not display much competence with the advanced systems.

But, for a normal operating jetliner, your average PPL could keep it under control in conditions they were used to (VMC), they would just be behind with speed management, and planning descents etc.

The point is that the post PPL confidence will be largely type specific - they could be quite confident in one, but very uneasy in another. I know many C 182 pilots who would be really not confident jumping into a C 18, but that does not take away from their being confident in the 182.
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Old 7th Jan 2015, 22:35
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: New Zealand
Posts: 350
If you do double up with another pilot as I have done, make sure it is with someone who will allow you to make your own decisions and respect your authority as p1 for that leg. The dynamic of the relationship must be unambiguous in this regard. Constructive advice is useful but the old adage "too many cooks spoil the broth" is perhaps truer in flying than other areas.
I basically inform them of their legal obligation as my passenger to keep their hands and feet free of the controls at all times unless otherwise instructed. One of my pilot friends is quite fidgety so I let him do most of the radio work as it gives him an outlet for his nervous energy, but 99% of the time my pilot friends are quiet and just enjoy being a passenger when flying in the right seat.

Last edited by flyinkiwi; 11th Jan 2015 at 20:48.
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Old 7th Jan 2015, 22:55
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Central London
Age: 37
Posts: 311
I basically inform them of their legal obligation as my passenger to keep their hands and feet free of the controls at all times unless otherwise instructed. One of my pilot friends is quite fidgety so I let him do most the radio work as it gives him an outlet for his nervous energy, but 99% of the time my pilot friends are quiet and just enjoy being a passenger when flying in the right seat.
I find the non-pilots are normally white as a sheet and far too terrified to touch anything. Although, as my girlfriend says, it could be because they've experienced my driving and the reality has just sunk in that I'm about to take them flying.
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Old 8th Jan 2015, 13:45
  #30 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: nottingham
Age: 38
Posts: 65
Bluejays -

When your learning your aptitude is to be really serious. I passed my PPL last year and am fairly studious, i have get things right and if i dont stop until I do.

Some of my favorite flights after passing were just going for it, ie a few XC trips and some longer flights. Not using Skydemon as navigation is and was always my weakest strength and building on that weakness.

I probably did 25hrs extra just pleasure flying and getting checked out in a C182 and then taking friends and family up - freakin luvved it!!! and was not scared, or anxious(when i probably should have been)

My last flight was Octoberish - some family are asking me to take them up, but since falling from being completely current, I certainly have a huge amount of hesitation.

Good thing is i intend to complete an aerobatics course, then IMC shortly which will then instill that confidence and further experience.

It feels the simplest answer is to ensure you can afford to keep flying as with anything in life, practice makes perfect and if you stop you get "rusty" - not a huge issue with certain other hobbies but in flying this can kill you - so it helps if you can enjoy while being safe and serious lol!!!

I struggle at the moment as i don't have anyone similar to me to fly and share with - however offsetting that, the most fun I have is being up there, on my own, in an amazing kind of peace, tranquility and exquisite scenery - that never fails to put a smile on my face and often don't want to share it with someone anyway lol!!

Happy Flying!!!

regards

Tris

PS - being a new PPL and very green behind the ears, we still have the green P for passed on our wings!!!

I still probably only have 15% experience which when you look at it like that is a scary thought!
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