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Global Aviation Magazine : 60 Years of the Hercules

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Global Aviation Magazine : 60 Years of the Hercules

Old 18th Jun 2015, 15:54
  #3261 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
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k3k3,

You may have something with the Valiants, they were "retired" in 1965 ISTR, which would coincide nicely with the introduction of the K. This thread has a habit of resolving queries, when people add their "two penneth". Thanks for that.

Kilwhang,

You aren't wrong on the Doppler panel, I remember taking a team of linies to Nellis during Red Flag, to replace the resident Alberts dielectric, which had been smashed on a strip somewhere. I kept my head down about being a trade based rigger so that Lyneham/FATCOCK wouldn't pull the rigger SNCO from the team, needed for the post repair "Max Diff" pressure check.

Smudge
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 16:26
  #3262 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
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I recall diverting to Nellis after the inner pane of the co-pilots side window went with a bang. We were en-route to Salt Lake City when it happened and, like a true trucker, suggested that a warmer climate would be more conducive for the window sealant to cure after replacement. It took a few days to receive the new window panel, however, on the day of our departure, I witnessed the whole of the USAF flying display team plough into the dessert floor, i.e. the airfield, and we spent a further couple of days in Vegas. As I recall, we then set off for Barksdale to join the remainder of the Red Flag slop pattern where we became redirected to go back to Nellis. I recall my being away for about two-weeks bouncing back and forth between Nellis and Gander.


Happy daze!


TCF
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 16:41
  #3263 (permalink)  
 
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I was told that the reason for metrification was that the Movers had a new loading computer that worked in KGs. Could be wrong, but always happy to blame the movers......

I also remember that the J had different metric numbers to the K - could also be wrong there too!
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 16:44
  #3264 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
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The 767 glider in 1983 came about because of a Kg/Lbs/US Gals/Ltr mix up and u/s on board systems.

PM
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 17:20
  #3265 (permalink)  
 
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Couldn't possibly comment, wouldn't want to upset T.

"Small quantities of fluid" could hurt your bum one would have thought . . .

OK Mr Fergie, I'll behave.

KGs had no place on a C130K, all those figures our wives and kids could quote suddenly had no place . . . I went to fly Tristars for Caledonian - much easier
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 17:37
  #3266 (permalink)  
 
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Brian,

The small quantities of fluid relate to my reference to a "wee nippie sweetie", a small whisky. If you don't drink, then I'm sure there's an alcohol free version, involving carrots. Kgs certainly never belonged on Albert, for a start, I was never given any training in "continental" measurements as an apprentice at Halton. Albert, from my list above was at least from the avionics point of view given a British, not European, identity. As several have already said, why change ?

TCF,

We had a similar situation on a Caribbean trainer where we completed the low level tasking with a crazed Captains window, but had to take a 24 hour delay to replace and test the replacement screen flown down by BA. The crew, unsurprisingly had few objections to the logical fix, and surprisingly, it all ran to revised schedule. I will send you a PM regarding your time at Boscombe, hopefully it will bring back some other memories.

Smudge

Last edited by smujsmith; 18th Jun 2015 at 17:54.
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 18:53
  #3267 (permalink)  
 
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Crazy Windows

Cruising down the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S. of A, we were suddenly entertained by a loud bang and the Captain's side window went like a shower screen. This was followed by said window pinging painful splinters of glass at close intervals into the Captain's face. A bin bag and bodge tape screen kept most of the shrapnel off but soon he got fed up and we diverted into Patrick AFB. "Got a Herc window?" we asked "No" they said.
UK Ops said "Cut a piece of aluminium to size and bolt it in the frame"
"Poke Off" we replied. The box labelled "window" duly arrived on BA and the customs bloke handed it over. "You must be strong" we said. "No its quite light"
Sure enough there was no window in it.
We became quite native in Florida before it was replaced, fitted and cured in the 30 deg heat. A nice spot for a hol.
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 19:45
  #3268 (permalink)  
 
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Doug,

I had the same story from a GE who was on that trip. It appears that no one checked the weight of the box related to a box, plus windscreen! No doubt, it wasn't the first "faux pas", committed by Lynehams supply system. Another "fellow GE" related their breakdown somewhere in Africa, with a seriously leaking flap hydraulic pipe that could not be fixed "on site". A request for the spare was placed, which duly arrived, courtesy of BA. Now, nothing to do directly with BA but I understand, but that they had a length limit of 2 Mtrs (whatever that is) on packages in their hold, the new pipe was around 14 feet long (a bit too long) so, the stackers bent it in half to conform to shipping limitations. you can imagine the reaction of the AGE on receipt of the bent pipe. Funnily enough, a passing VC10 dropped off an unbent version of the pipe within 24 hours.

The funniest event I personally encountered was during a return from somewhere east of Akronelli, when we had an ignition relay failure on our No3 Engine. As it was not long after GW1 there was a U.S. C130 outfit located on the airfield we were stuck at. They offered us a spare, which had a slightly different part number to the one we removed. With one start required to Akronelli we signalled Lyneham Ops for permission to use the offered spare to get us to Cyprus, and the correct part. No way said Lyneham, stay there we will send you the correct item. Well, blow me down, you know what's coming, the spare arrived Civiair from UK and was duly identified as the same part number as the item the U.S. Air Force kindly offered us 36 hours earlier. We once again corresponded with Lyneham Ops and informed them what we had received, admittedly the question we asked was "do you want us to use the -A7 that the USAF offered or the -A7 you sent ? Particularly as you insist that we need an -A12. Ops lost no time in blaming Supply Squadron for having the wrong items on their shelves and insisted on a further 36 hour delay as we waited for the correct part. I believe they sent a Propulsion SNCO to examine the second offering before dispatch. I can guarantee that there's a lot more similar anecdotes on this particular trail. I suspect that other AT fleets may have suffered similar problems.

Smudge
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 20:04
  #3269 (permalink)  
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Good evening all ... Albert First Aid ... marvellous stuff !!!

More please
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 20:25
  #3270 (permalink)  
 
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The relevant verse of my song about the 'K': (tune Greensleeves)

"Three orange lights, pumps OFF at the rush
Christ, we're stuck here four days with an hydraulic flush
But we carry four boxes and two rubber wheels
A green towing arm and all the wrong seals"

Why do you think I wrote that?
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Old 18th Jun 2015, 20:40
  #3271 (permalink)  
 
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OK Coff, not sure if I ran the whole route in previous posts, but Doug will confirm if my ageing recollection is accurate.

Our outbound flight to Adelaide, to collect the detritus of the Maritime Competion that year, continued from our run in the jungles of Borneo with the hash house harriers, with a night stop in Darwin, and then a long leg across Oz to Adelaide, where a nice night off beckoned. Not so for the two GEs, as we had been nursing a leaking prop, along the way. Our Flight Eng, ISTR the First "Lady Flight Eng" (not that it matters) was aware of the leaking rear GITZ, as was the Captain. On arrival at Adelaide, the prop hydraulic level was off the dipstick, and, we estimated unlikely to get us back to Darwin (our next scheduled stop) without being shut down. Now, one thing most GEs in my day prided themselves in was knowing where the spares or support were, and we were both well aware of RAAF Richmond, home of the Antipodean Albert. So we rang them up, spoke to their duty Engineer Officer, and asked if they could help with a prop drop, GITZ replacement, refit and EGRs as required. No probs Pom was the response, so, it was put to ATFOC and the Captain, we went to Richmind for a 24 hour, unscheduled delay.

I'm sure that Doug and the lads (and Lady) enjoyed their time in Sydney, had I and Tucker T not been busy playing with a propellor, we would have too. But, having spent that night trying to catch up on their sight seeing, we left the next day for Darwin, with a good prop, and confidence we would get Albert home.


Posing with my "route steal" boomerang (which I still have) after an all nighter in Sydney. Hmm, Still got a good head of hair, but apologise for the ugly mug !!

Our arrival in Darwin was normal, with the standard 14-16 hours ground time planned. The next morning we were grounded by FATCOCK when our Air Eng went sick with a throat/chest infection. A 24 hour delay followed, and I can't remember who played in the crew Golf match (Doug ?) but I certainly wasn't in the winning team. The return was pretty standard for such a route, and, I have to say was one of the best memories I retain from my days as a GE. For the GE, it wasn't always Albert that threw Wobblies!!!



Smudge

Last edited by smujsmith; 18th Jun 2015 at 21:33.
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Old 19th Jun 2015, 07:40
  #3272 (permalink)  
 
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Smudge,
well done digging up that list of UK supplied equipment. I wonder how much of it was new and whether much thought had been given to compatibility/mutual electronic interference. The Doppler tripping off and the 'T' handles illuminating when certain HF frequencies were used springs to mind.
I had two explosive decompressions due to the Doppler panel blowout. The first scared me to death but the on second I recognised the symptoms. Windscreen failures were not uncommon and getting the sealer to 'go off' could sometimes involve a great deal of ingenuity on the part of the G/E.
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Old 19th Jun 2015, 09:55
  #3273 (permalink)  
 
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I've been following this thread since it first started and have enjoyed all the tales, but this is the first time I've ventured onto the thread, to ask a couple of questions.

Firstly, unless he is hiding behind a Bead Window, who or what was FATCOCK?
Secondly, what is flagging?

My one and only encounter with a Hercules was at Lyneham in 1968, when as a UAS APO, I was waiting for a trip to Akrotiri as a supernumerary in a Britannia.

At short notice (the engines were already running), I was offered a Hercules trip. I can't remember the official reason for the flight, but we deviated from the official plan for a rendezvous with a Campbeltown fishmonger at Macrihanish. While we were there, he made deliveries to two Varsities, one of which was from Cranwell.

I remember that there was some concern about the APU, so to avoid potentially having to explain why we were stuck on the ground at a place we shouldn't be, the Captain kept one of the engines running during the fishy transaction.

An added bonus of my few days at Lyneham was that I got to see Concorde 002 on its maiden flight from Filton to Fairford.
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Old 19th Jun 2015, 10:40
  #3274 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by India Four Two View Post
Firstly, unless he is hiding behind a Bead Window, who or what was FATCOCK?
Secondly, what is flagging?
FATCOCK is Smudge's name for 'ATFOC' = Air Transport Flight Operations Centre. Part of 38 Gp at Strike Command it was a 24hr manned flight watch centre that we Albert crews could refer to when 'down route'. Sometimes helpful, more usually not!

Flagging - To 'flag' somewhere is to land, do a turn round and then depart, as opposed to doing a 'night stop'.
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Old 19th Jun 2015, 11:20
  #3275 (permalink)  
 
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Hmm, Concorde 002. One of the two nose and visor assemblies I production controlled in my year with Marshalls of Cambridge, as it was then. Indeed, whilst I was there Marshalls got the Herc contract and Mr (later Sir Arthur) Marshall's Bentley (MCE777) disappeared, to be replaced by a Cadillac (also MCE777)
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Old 19th Jun 2015, 11:57
  #3276 (permalink)  
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Smudge ...

Are you sure that isn't a bellcrank for a Herc control line somewhere
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Old 19th Jun 2015, 13:43
  #3277 (permalink)  
 
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IFT,
in the same vein FEAF HQ was known as Fort Fumble. There were many others !
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Old 19th Jun 2015, 15:46
  #3278 (permalink)  
 
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To 'flag' somewhere is to land, do a turn round and then depart, as opposed to doing a 'night stop'.
ExA,
I guessed that might be it from the context from the context. Does anyone know the origin of the term?

aa62,
CASA in Canberra has inherited the epithet Fort Fumble!
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Old 19th Jun 2015, 18:08
  #3279 (permalink)  
 
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Flagging

I believe the term originated from the days when the Royal Navy ruled the waves.

Royal Naval ships would visit ports in the Empire, with all flags flying, to remind the 'natives' who was boss. The only reason for the visits was a show of power and was known as 'Showing the Flag'. The term later evolved into meaning a temporary stop or transit.

Within the RAF Air Transport fleet it was changed to 'flagging' and meant what Ex-Ascoteer has already posted.
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Old 19th Jun 2015, 18:50
  #3280 (permalink)  
 
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ExAscoteer and Kilwhang,

Thank you both for explaining my references to things that most of the C130K community would be familiar with. It's very easy to forget that some who follow the thread are not particularly familiar with "fleet speak". I wonder what the VC10 fleet called ATFOC, in private ?

Coff #3276, if it would fit anywhere on Albert, I would suggest the elevator input bellcrank (banana levers), from memory a similar size ! It looks good on the bedroom wall though, and thankfully survived the trip.

India 42,

What a great choice you made in your destination change. I was lucky enough to be SNCO i/c VASS at Machrihanish, long after your visit, and the fishmonger was still operating. Many a four ship Buccaneer trip, on a Friday came to get the Salmon for Laarbruchs weekend mess function. I will never forget the Nimrod from Kinloss that took on a great load of fish for a summer ball, or some such, refuelling, then being diverted to a search and rescue task. The way I heard it was that by the time the crew returned to Kinloss they were knackered, and forgot the fish. All was brought to light when a few crews later, the aircraft was "snagged" for a seriously bad smell. The rotting fish was eventually found in the APU bay, rotting. No wonder it was known as the "kipper fleet". I wonder if anyone ever experienced similar problems on Albert? Finally, you will all sigh with relief, did anyone on this thread have the experience of the large rodent that chewed the electrical system ?

Smudge
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