Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Worldwide > Italian Forum
Reload this Page >

Can we improve trainee pilot selection to ensure successful training outcomes?

Can we improve trainee pilot selection to ensure successful training outcomes?

Old 4th Aug 2020, 16:02
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: BLQ
Posts: 1,291
Can we improve trainee pilot selection to ensure successful training outcomes?

Fonte skybrary.aero

Description

On 10 April 2017, a Boeing 757-200 (G-LSAI) being operated by Jet2.com on an international passenger flight from Leeds-Bradford to Alicante, during which the First Officer was undergoing a Final Line Check conducted by a Training Captain occupying the left seat observed by another Training Captain occupying the supernumerary crew seat, was mishandled during a day VMC landing and was subsequently found to have sustained significant damage after the rear fuselage struck the runway. None of the 238 occupants were injured but the runway surface was also marked.

Investigation

An Investigation into the Accident was carried out by the Spanish Commission for the Investigation of Accidents and Incidents (CIAIAC). Both the CVR and FDR were removed from the aircraft and downloaded but it was found that the 30 minutes of high quality CVR data had been overwritten because of a post flight delay in isolating the recorder, which was contrary to clear instructions in the Operations Manual (OM).

It was found that the 52 year-old Supervising Training Captain had a total of 9,431 flying hours which included 1,000 hours on type and had been employed by Jet2.com for over three years having previously worked for two other air transport operators for 15 years. The 36 year-old First Officer, who had been PF for the flight, had a total of 652 flying hours which included 285 hours on type under training and had been working for Jet2.com for four years, beginning as a ”Pilot Apprentice”, a non-flying position which had then been followed by 14 months employment as a First Officer. The 60-year old Training Captain who was observing the Line Check had a total of 14,680 flying hours which included 4,455 hours on type and had been employed by Jet2.com for 12 years having previously worked for two other air transport operators for 17 years as a pilot and 10 years as a flight engineer.

It was established from the recorded data that the flight prior to the landing had been “standard in terms of procedural performance, with a good crew atmosphere” and the aircraft had been configured for a flap 30 landing and a VREF of 126 KIAS. The destination weather was good with just a light wind more or less down the runway in use - 10 - for which the First Officer, as PF briefed for an ILS approach with the AP engaged. This was flown in accordance with the required stabilized approach criteria and the AP was disconnected at 400 feet agl and the landing flare initiated at 100 feet agl. The pitch attitude was further increased to 6° at 48 feet agl and after the thrust levers reached the idle position at 10 feet agl, touchdown occurred four seconds later with a 5° recorded pitch angle at 119KCAS (VREF-7) and auto spoiler deployment occurred. It was noted that nine seconds in the flare was on the long side and as such seen by Boeing as “a risk factor for tail strike”. An increase in pitch attitude was then recorded reaching a maximum of 10.2° three seconds after touchdown accompanied by a peak in the normal load factor which it was considered was likely to be a consequence of the tail hitting the ground. When the Captain was recorded telling the First Officer to lower the nose position induced by the low touchdown speed, he also instructed him to increase power, which was followed by a slight advance of the thrust levers although not by enough to trigger retraction of the ground spoilers. However since the spoilers did retract it was “considered that this could have been done manually by one of the crew members”. The increase in lift which this produced and the aircraft’s 7° pitch attitude at the time produced a momentary 1 second change from ground mode to flight mode which coincided with a high magnitude recorded movement of the control column. This was identified by the First Officer as a rebound and on that basis he had called “go around”.

At this point, the Captain took over control of the aircraft and the ground spoilers were again extended following which the pitch attitude decreased towards zero, reaching it when the aircraft ground speed had reduced to 100 knots some 13 seconds after touchdown after which the landing roll was completed without further event.

During the subsequent taxi-in, there was no discussion on the flight deck about the abnormal landing but once parked, a conversation with one of the cabin crew who had entered the flight deck to report having heard “a strange noise while landing” was recorded. The CVR also recorded the communication between an airport marshaller and the TWR indicating that the landing had involved a “wheelie” and a tail strike and requesting permission to enter the runway and carry out an inspection. A 4 metre trail indicating fuselage contact with the runway pavement was then found and inspection of the aircraft lower tail cone found corresponding abrasive damage to the structure of the VHF antenna and a water drain mast. Subsequently it was discovered that the partition bulkhead of the rear loading hold was also damaged.

It was noted that the Flight Crew Training Manual (FCTM) described the correct technique for landing the aircraft and makes it clear that if the pitch attitude exceeds 10° with the wings level, there is a risk of striking the lower rear section of the aircraft on the runway surface.

It was found that the First Officer had completed the generic 757 type rating course during February and March 2016 followed by an Operator Conversion Course (OCC) and then some additional simulator training “to reinforce single-engine operation, a weakness detected in the OCC”. After passing his Operator's Proficiency Check (OPC), scheduled base training on the aircraft did not occur due to unsuitable weather conditions and a series of further simulator sessions followed, initially attributable to the base training delay but then continuing due to unsatisfactory performance. Base Training on the aircraft was eventually completed on 9 August 2016 and a scheduled 40 sectors of line training was scheduled and commenced on 23 August. The First Officer’s recorded progress during line training was erratic and attempts at a Final Line Check on 14 January and 2 March 2017 both ended in failure, the first because the Check Captain had to take over during touchdown and the second because the hard landing performed was “below company standards”. The first of these failed Checks had already been preceded by 14 additional line training sectors and the second by a further 12. Following the second failed Check, 10 additional line training sectors were scheduled which were flown between 4 and 26 February 2017. It was noted that the Training volume of the company OM allowed up to one third of the allocated line training sectors to be provided at each remedial stage up to a maximum of 100% of the originally allocated sectors and that “with this last allocation the First Officer had reached the foreseen maximum”. It was noted further relevant requirements in relation to landing proficiency during line training were contained in the company “Flight Crew Training Guidelines” document. The additional sectors were flown in accordance with these guidelines following completion of an OPC/LPC in the simulator and were completed on 7 April 2017 and the accident flight followed three days later. It was noted that during the extended period of line training, the First Officer had made a total of 60 landings including 11 which had required intervention by the Training Captain involved.

The Investigation noted that the aircraft type has a known and documented tendency for the pitch attitude to increase after touchdown and a consequent risk of tail strike if the nose landing gear is kept in the air. It was considered that the low speed of the aircraft at the time of a rather firm touchdown had led to the increasing pitch attitude and that although the opportunity for the Captain to take control earlier may well have prevented the tail strike, the Observing Training Captain had stated that he would “have been influenced by the fact that if he had taken control earlier the First Officer would have failed his Final Line Check immediately”.

It was noted that having exhausted the specified limits of competency training after failing a third Final Line Check despite receiving the maximum amount of supportive type training, the First Officer’s employment contract was subsequently terminated. It was also noted that according to information supplied by the operator, the Supervising Training Captain “had already failed the First Officer because of high pitch attitude before he was aware of the tail strike”.

The Cause of the event was formally documented as "incorrect pitch position control during landing”.

One Contributory Factor was also identified as “the fact that the Captain of the aircraft (PM) could have intervened before the accident to correct the situation”.

The final report of the Investigation was approved for release in both Spanish and in English translation on 25 April 2018. No Safety Recommendations were made.

Final report here
EI-PAUL is offline  
Old 4th Aug 2020, 17:21
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Just Around The Corner
Posts: 1,212
Dai dati del copilota , 372 ore e poi il 757 , 60 atterraggi di cui 11 con intervento manuale del TCaptain...
Nick 1 is online now  
Old 4th Aug 2020, 19:37
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Amantido
Posts: 441
FO donna, probabilmente spinta proprio dall'ondata del "female power" e "positive discrimination" che è fortemente presente negli assessment tenuti dalle risorse umane in alcune compagnie anglosassoni.
Provate a creare un profilo sul loro portale e spenderete una buona ora a rispondere alle domande riguardanti genere, orientamento sessuale, religione, ecc. È brutto da dire, ma questo è stato anche uno dei fattori nell'incidente del 767 Atlas che si è schiantato a Houston.

Non sto assolutamente dicendo che le donne non possono essere ai comandi di un aereo, ma ciò non dovrebbe influire alle selezioni.
Banana Joe is online now  
Old 5th Aug 2020, 06:25
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: OFCR
Age: 33
Posts: 322
Ma perchè avviare un cadetto alla linea su un 757 quando si ha in flotta anche il 737?


Papa_Golf is offline  
Old 5th Aug 2020, 06:30
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Amantido
Posts: 441
Fa enorme differenza? Non credo. DHL è piena di cadetti sull'A300 e 757. Questo può succedere su qualsiasi aereo.
Banana Joe is online now  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 05:19
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Sicily
Posts: 51
Ci vuole un severo esame psico attitudinale amministrato dall' ente aeronautico prima del inizio dell' training per ATPL . Una specie di DLR obbligatorio. Molta gente non finirebbe col fare il mestiere sbagliato pagandosi il posto e mettendo a rischio la vita dei passeggeri.

​​​​​​
puposiciliano is offline  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 06:30
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Amantido
Posts: 441
E infatti è stato un successo con Lubitz...
Banana Joe is online now  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:13
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: too far away from home
Age: 34
Posts: 263
Originally Posted by Banana Joe View Post
E infatti è stato un successo con Lubitz...
Continuano ad esserci casi di piloti che hanno un infarto in volo. Chiaramente le visite per il rinnovo del certificato medico sono inutili e possiamo farne a meno.
nibbio86 is offline  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:23
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Amantido
Posts: 441
Non so com'è in Italia, ma in Olanda la visita medica per il rinnovo è abbastanza superficiale. Un'ora e sei già sulla via di casa. Ma questo è un altro discorso.

Il FO di questo evento aveva già dimostrato più volte difficoltà in fase di atterraggio, perché non è stata fermata e ricevuto additional training prima?
Essere in grado di ricordarsi una manciata di numeri al contrario non ha nulla a che fare con l'atterrare un aereo.
Banana Joe is online now  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:23
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milano
Age: 35
Posts: 271
Originally Posted by Banana Joe View Post
FO donna, probabilmente spinta proprio dall'ondata del "female power" e "positive discrimination" che è fortemente presente negli assessment tenuti dalle risorse umane in alcune compagnie anglosassoni..
Ciao.
Mi dici da dove viene l'informazione che fosse una donna, non lo trovo nel Report.
E anche per il 767 di huston visto che uno si chiamava Ricky e l'altro Conrad.
I-NNAV is offline  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:25
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Amantido
Posts: 441
Originally Posted by I-NNAV View Post
Ciao.
Mi dici da dove viene l'informazione che fosse una donna, non lo trovo nel Report.
E anche per il 767 di huston visto che uno si chiamava Ricky e l'altro Conrad.
Nel forum inglese è intervenuto un pilota che lavora per Jet2.
Nel caso di Houston, mi riferisco all'etnia del FO. Ha influito con le risorse umane.

Banana Joe is online now  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:26
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Having a margarita on the beach
Age: 48
Posts: 1,735
Originally Posted by nibbio86 View Post
Continuano ad esserci casi di piloti che hanno un infarto in volo. Chiaramente le visite per il rinnovo del certificato medico sono inutili e possiamo farne a meno.
Esattamente.

È evidente che nessun sistema selettivo/valutativo potrà mai garantire il 100% dell'accuratezza, ma i sistemi di valutazione/selezione -sia medica che professionale- che abbiamo al giorno d'oggi garantiscono comunque una accuratezza più che soddisfacente e dovrebbero essere maggiormente impiegati.

Possibilità secondo me che in futuro l'accesso alla professione sia più regolamentato/disciplinato/normato ? Zero.
Possibilità che si riducano ulteriormente i tempi necessari ad arrivare "from zero" to super astronauta ATPL frozen ? Alte.
sonicbum is offline  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:35
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Having a margarita on the beach
Age: 48
Posts: 1,735
Originally Posted by Banana Joe View Post
Non so com'è in Italia, ma in Olanda la visita medica per il rinnovo è abbastanza superficiale. Un'ora e sei già sulla via di casa. Ma questo è un altro discorso.

Il FO di questo evento aveva già dimostrato più volte difficoltà in fase di atterraggio, perché non è stata fermata e ricevuto additional training prima?
Essere in grado di ricordarsi una manciata di numeri al contrario non ha nulla a che fare con l'atterrare un aereo.
Scusa ma stai facendo un mix di cose che hanno obbiettivi diversi : selezione/valutazione psico-attitudinale e psico-metrica e training professionale. I primi servono a valutare se il tuo sistema socio-cognitivo è compatibile con il tipo di addestramento per diventare pilota ed il secondo serve per darti le competenze necessarie a poter operare in sicurezza il tuo mezzo.
Se i primi vengono fatti bene ma il secondo no, significa che non avrai le competenze necessarie per volare in sicurezza come nel caso in oggetto.
sonicbum is offline  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:43
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Amantido
Posts: 441
E la domanda rimane: con le difficoltà più volte documentate perché non sono state prese decisioni correttive prima di arrivare al terzo line check?
Perché ti assicuro che in Jet2 i test psicometrici non mancano, specialmente per il programma Pilot Apprentice di cui il FO in questione faceva parte.
Banana Joe is online now  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:43
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Milano
Age: 35
Posts: 271
Originally Posted by Banana Joe View Post
Nel forum inglese è intervenuto un pilota che lavora per Jet2.
Nel caso di Houston, mi riferisco all'etnia del FO. Ha influito con le risorse umane.
Mi piace come nel forum inglese tu abbia provato a portare avanti la tua teoria sessista e nessuno ti abbia dato corda. Quindi per te se uno è donna o nero è passato sicuramente per un doppio standard. Tu sei il tipo di troglodita che spero gli HR smettano di assumere, perché di certo non avrei piacere di dividere con te il mik cockpit.
I-NNAV is offline  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:45
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Having a margarita on the beach
Age: 48
Posts: 1,735
Originally Posted by Banana Joe View Post
E la domanda rimane: con le difficoltà più volte documentate perché non sono state prese decisioni correttive prima di arrivare al terzo line check?
Perché ti assicuro che in Jet2 i test psicometrici non mancano, specialmente per il programma Pilot Apprentice di cui il FO in questione faceva parte.
Ah boh ! L'unica cosa che so di Jet2 è che è una compagnia aerea...
sonicbum is offline  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:46
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Amantido
Posts: 441
Originally Posted by I-NNAV View Post
Mi piace come nel forum inglese tu abbia provato a portare avanti la tua teoria sessista e nessuno ti abbia dato corda. Quindi per te se uno è donna o nero è passato sicuramente per un doppio standard. Tu sei il tipo di troglodita che spero gli HR smettano di assumere, perché di certo non avrei piacere di dividere con te il mik cockpit.
Assolutamente no, ci mancherebbe. Sto solo dicendo che nel processo di selezione queste variabili non dovrebbero influenzare il processo selettivo.


​​​​​
Banana Joe is online now  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:48
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Having a margarita on the beach
Age: 48
Posts: 1,735
Originally Posted by I-NNAV View Post
Mi piace come nel forum inglese tu abbia provato a portare avanti la tua teoria sessista e nessuno ti abbia dato corda. Quindi per te se uno è donna o nero è passato sicuramente per un doppio standard. Tu sei il tipo di troglodita che spero gli HR smettano di assumere, perché di certo non avrei piacere di dividere con te il mik cockpit.
Aspetta a togliere la sicura del mitra, secondo me non ha tutti i torti ; in UK il politicamente corretto ormai è un'ossessione così come la parità di genere "qualsiasi esso sia".
Non è questione di essere trogloditi ma si sta andando troppo lontano su alcuni fronti. Mi diceva un amico che lavora per una compagnia UK che nei loro PA ai pax non possono più usare i termini "Ladies and gentlemen" perché c'è chi si offende non sentendosi ne l'uno ne l'altro. Ma dai...
sonicbum is offline  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 09:55
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Amantido
Posts: 441
Originally Posted by sonicbum View Post
Ah boh ! L'unica cosa che so di Jet2 è che è una compagnia aerea...
E aggiungerei anche una signora compagnia aerea per quello che ho potuto vedere.
E sicuramente con del training addizionale al simulatore focalizzato sulle carenze, la FO in oggetto avrebbe probabilmente riempito le lacune. Perché le potenzialità le aveva già ampiamente dimostrate.
Banana Joe is online now  
Old 6th Aug 2020, 13:25
  #20 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: BLQ
Posts: 1,291
My two cents

L’articolo, dal titolo volutamente “polemico”, mi sembra incentri l’attenzione sulla selezione iniziale più che su quello che avviene dopo, vale a dire il periodo formativo. Ovviamente va da se che tra le due cose ci sia uno stretto rapporto di causa / effetto.

La domanda fondamentale è: a che serve selezionare?

La risposta finale, secondo me, è: a risparmiare tempo e quindi denaro. Può sembrare un controsenso ma è esattamente così.

Razionalmente si può addestrare qualsiasi essere umano sano e normo-dotato di qualsiasi colore, etnia, cultura razza e sesso a diventare pilota.

Statisticamente però, e qui casca l'asino, su una scala temporale c’è chi ci metterà 12 ore per il primo solista e chi ne impiegherà 24, 48, 72 …

Altrettanto statisticamente si è visto che questi gap raramente vengono colmati nell’arco della formazione.

Sempre statisticamente, è stato notato che generalmente chi decolla da solo in 12 ore ha tratti attitudinali caratteristici che lo contraddistinguono da chi invece ne impiega 24, 48, 72. (Per chi è interessato un approfondimento tecnico, può trovare uno degli elaborati di studio più importanti QUI.)

Da questo deriva che, se ho in mente un programma di addestramento (sillabus), posso cucirlo attorno al profilo di un candidato tipo, esattamente come un sarto fa con un vestito su misura. AMI ed AZ, per fare un esempio tra tanti, facevano esattamente questo, scegliendo per convenienza i candidati che garantiva maggior possibilità di successo nel minor tempo possibile.

Cosa è cambiato oggi a livello di Sillabi? poco o nulla. Il motivo è che disegnare un Sillabus anche per quelli che non ci mettono 12 ore ma 24, 48 o 72 rischia di essere poco appetibile. Un po’ come quando vedi una bella macchina a 12 mila euro ma poi vai dal concessionario e scopri che in realtà costa il quadruplo, perché quello che sponsorizzano è solo il modello base.

Soprattutto, un Sillabus più corposo rischia di erodere i margini di guadagno della ATO, che sono più scuole di volo ma vere e proprie "business unit”.

E da qui rispondo alla domanda di Banana:
Il FO di questo evento aveva già dimostrato più volte difficoltà in fase di atterraggio, perché non è stata fermata e ricevuto additional training prima?


Il poverino/a ha ricevuto tutto l’addestramento che la Compagnia ha ritenuto “conveniente” concedere in termine di costi, che evidentemente non era sufficiente per lei / lui. La realtà è che, in un mondo ideale, lei/lui non sarebbe dovuto essere lì. Questo avrebbe risparmiato un’enorme delusione all’allievo, dalla quale ci vorrà tempo per riprendersi, e probabilmente non poche notti insonni a più di un Istruttore. Ma una volta che è lì il dovere morale di un Istruttore è tentare di formarti allo standard fino all'ultimo, usando tutti gli strumenti a disposizione.

Ultima domanda, che in realtà è una provocazione: Vi siete mai chiesti perché oggigiorno si fa numero chiuso pure per chi vuole diventare giardiniere ma non per i piloti?

Last edited by EI-PAUL; 6th Aug 2020 at 13:49.
EI-PAUL is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.