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How easy for fresh fATPL holders to get A Flight Instructor Job

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How easy for fresh fATPL holders to get A Flight Instructor Job

Old 29th Sep 2019, 19:38
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How easy for fresh fATPL holders to get A Flight Instructor Job

Hi guys,
I am wondering how difficult/easy/likely it is for fresh fATPL holders + flight instructor rating with no previous flying job to get jobs as flight instructors.

Are flight schools open to this or are they very averse to this?
Are there so many fATPL holders trying to do this that it is very competitive and saturated?

Just for context (but not to derail the thread) I am still deciding between integrated and modular training. If I go modular there may be no chance of an airline taking me fresh, but I will be in a better financial position to do a flight instructor rating. And therefore maybe have a chance to build hours and experience.
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Old 30th Sep 2019, 19:05
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If you gained a fATPL, surely you’d be qualified to apply to the airlines, so why train to become a FI on top?
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Old 1st Oct 2019, 18:28
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If cost is the main factor and you want to get into the airlines, I would do your training modular and follow some advice on this forum. Keep your CPL/IR training at one school, really research where you do your JOC/MCC course and work as hard as you can in your ground school, flight tests, MCC etc. There is no shortage of qualified fATPL holders looking for airline work, there is always a need for QUALITY applicants that can cope with the demands of a Type Rating. If you are motivated and willing then you will succeed.

I wouldn't necessarily bother with an FI rating unless you have no problem spending the money doing it or have a desire to be an instructor.
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Old 1st Oct 2019, 19:57
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If you have the money

If you have the money and want to join airlines go via MPL route.

Reason

Your being trained what you need Multi crew flying in an airline environment from Day 1.

If you don't go via Modular and work hard

carry on!
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Old 1st Oct 2019, 20:18
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Originally Posted by yap800 View Post
Hi guys,
I am wondering how difficult/easy/likely it is for fresh fATPL holders + flight instructor rating with no previous flying job to get jobs as flight instructors.

Are flight schools open to this or are they very averse to this?
Are there so many fATPL holders trying to do this that it is very competitive and saturated?

Just for context (but not to derail the thread) I am still deciding between integrated and modular training. If I go modular there may be no chance of an airline taking me fresh, but I will be in a better financial position to do a flight instructor rating. And therefore maybe have a chance to build hours and experience.
Even if you start your training today, it will be over 12 months before your basic training will be complete.
The recent news of airlines ceasing to trade may well be a warning of things to come.

At present, modular students are not disadvantaged from going straight into the airlines, provided their training goes well.
There are a number of full time modular ATOs who get good results.
The majority of new FI(R) start instructing PPL at flying clubs. Once you gain 200 hours then the larger ATOs might be an option. Unless you have a real interest in instructing probably best to give it a wide berth.

But before spending anything on training, obtain your Class One Medical.
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Old 1st Oct 2019, 20:24
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Originally Posted by James Ken McIntosh View Post
If you have the money and want to join airlines go via MPL route.

Reason

Your being trained what you need Multi crew flying in an airline environment from Day 1.

If you don't go via Modular and work hard

carry on!
Whilst MPL is bespoke training for the RHS, you need to be sponsored and/or contracted by an airline and you will use their SOPs etc during the 120 hour simulator phase.
So MPL training cannot be done by just signing up to an ATO for the training.
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Old 1st Oct 2019, 20:42
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Originally Posted by parkfell View Post


Whilst MPL is bespoke training for the RHS, you need to be sponsored and/or contracted by an airline and you will use their SOPs etc during the 120 hour simulator phase.
So MPL training cannot be done by just signing up to an ATO for the training.
That's the point, practice for the applitude test, and get in and after the training phase is done you'll be flying airliners

Gaining valuable flight hours

if your in a position to do so.

at the end of the day it depends what your end goal is.

if you want to fly airlines straight out of flight school the most cost effective would be the MPL route

If your happy to fly G/A go FATPL route

what I will say,

The most important in training

PPL learning basic flying skills
IR - Instrument flying

If you decide to go modular don't underestimate the MCC course
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Old 2nd Oct 2019, 00:23
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@yap800: If you have spare cash for FI rating (plus the proper personality to teach someone) I believe its better to do it than just sit idle and wait for the airlines to respond (however recently a lot of people I know got quick response from the airlines and many have got a job at LOT). There are a lot of modular schools that offer job guarantee (if you pass all practical and theoretical exams ofc.) as instructor (the per block hour wage will be probably low in high cost nations (25 euro net per hour is little if renting a flat cost 1000 euro but if it cost 450 + everything is cheap then its a different story for example), in low cost nations its like 2-3x average salary depending upon flight hours done per month) if you complete your training at that school including the FI rating. I also heard about possibilities of being offered the cost of FI rating covered in exchange for a FI bond at schools (but then you have to pay if you get employed by an airline during the bond and break it).

From what I heard many airlines value the extra flight hours on CV. Plus I do actually believe flying with smaller aircraft is a nice experience to train hand flying skills (instructors do often have to recover different situations at least those who let the student fly&learn and do not correct with the controls immediately). In smaller aircraft you almost "feel more" of the weather conditions (and train more manually) than in a bigger one. I had the opportunity to hand fly (under supervision of the CFI) an Antonov AN-2 (amazing classic aircraft, more fun than the top modern 4 million USD aircraft) and Pilatus PC-12 NG and it actually felt like the manual effort to approach and land (not to mention correcting for wind/turbulence & thermal updrafts/downdrafts) is bigger in a smaller aircraft (trimming in bigger aircraft work much better). The Pilatus PC-12 NG felt almost like flying in a simulator (the forces of nature were not present on the yoke). Of course I have yet never been in control of the airline size aircraft so I have no idea if they are also "easier to hand fly & land" (plus most of the time from what I read its not allowed with hand flying other than takeoff and landing in most of the airlines).

As additional information some schools have also AOC or cooperate with companies that offer business flights and again you can for example be doing a class or type rating and flying passengers with a turboprop and that is definitely something to put on the CV I believe. There are lot of options to be flying and I believe the important thing is to use the opportunities to keep flying and do not sit and wait for the flying skills to be forgotten. No one who kept flying from what I know have ended with no airline job in the end (except those who for example found it more rewarding/enjoyable to fly a bizjet or become CRI/IRI for example).

Last edited by KT1988; 2nd Oct 2019 at 00:37.
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