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Medical Requirements for instructors

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Medical Requirements for instructors

Old 15th Jan 2024, 14:06
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Medical Requirements for instructors

Hi Folks quick question.

I have just retired from long haul flying (now 65) and am thinking about renewing my FI rating (previously unrestricted with SEP, MEP, Night, Aerobatic and IR).

Under what circumstances would I need a Class One medical? Commercial instructing ? IR instructing?

Edited to say in the UK.

Many thanks

Last edited by sixgee; 15th Jan 2024 at 14:26.
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Old 15th Jan 2024, 14:19
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Over here, all you need is a third….
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Old 15th Jan 2024, 17:41
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All you need is a CAA Class 2 medical for everything including the ME-IR except teaching the CPL practical course which requires a valid CAA Class 1 medical.
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Old 15th Jan 2024, 20:26
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Thanks Charlie Zulu

So if I were to be teaching the ME-IR element of an integrated course (not the bit for the GFT) I’d still need the class 1?

Post 65 evidently there’s a requirement for a private stress ECG and a cardio review for
class 1 but not for a class 2.

Starts to get expensive (especially when you’re use to getting medical paid for).
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Old 16th Jan 2024, 11:44
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Any instruction on a Integrated course requires a Class 1 because the candidates are ab initio training for a CPL. Training on modular courses for all ratings including ME and IR only requires a Class II because the candidate has a licence and is doing rating training.
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Old 18th Jan 2024, 08:21
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Thanks Whopity
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Old 18th Jan 2024, 23:52
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But if you are doing the CPL module of a modular course, the CAA insist that you have a Class 1 Medical!

It seems to hinge on the interpretation of the word 'valid'.

You must have a 'valid' qualification yourself, if you are to teach others for the issue of it.

You may have a 'valid' MEP, and an IR with a Class 2 Medical, but, although you may have a CPL, it is not considered 'valid' by the CAA, unless you have a Class 1 medical to go with it.

I can teach a PPL student steep turns, stalling, navigation, etc. with a Class 2, but to give the same training to someone who already has a PPL, for the purpose of gaining a CPL, I need a Class 1.

No safety case whatsoever.

It just multiplies my medical expenditure by about 4 times for absolutely no reason.


MJ
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Old 19th Jan 2024, 11:22
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All comes from ICAO Annex 1. The UK was quite unique in allowing PPLs to instruct without holding a CPL, a concession if you like. The BCPL only came about because the Europeans wanted to comply with Annex 1 in full. It was only when EASA took over that the concession to instruct on a PPL really came back.
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Old 21st Jan 2024, 09:10
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Not going to help over age 65 but the CAA do have a special Medical Limitation OML INST which allows someone to hold a Class 1 Certificate and instruct CPL but in effect the Certificate is at the Class 2 standard.
For advanced instruction and examining many have found the Class 2 Certificate with OSL useful and if paired with a PMD allows normal solo and passenger non instructing flying.
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Old 6th Feb 2024, 15:28
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Another couple of questions . It seems that a Stress ECG and a cardiology report is required for a Class One medical post 65. How often does this have to be done?
How long is a Class One medical valid for instructional purposes only post 65? 6 months?

Cheers,
sixgee
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Old 6th Feb 2024, 17:09
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All here for the UK. EASA is the same.

https://www.caa.co.uk/commercial-ind...-requirements/

FAA regulations are elsewhere. Part 61 possibly?

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Old 11th Feb 2024, 21:50
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As mentioned in an earlier post, only 3rd class required in the USA. I believe no medial required if you are only in a sim or giving ground instruction. Might seem light to only require a 3d class for air work, but think about it, you are giving instruction to a pilot who has a medical, probably a 2nd or better. Why does the instructor need a comparable license?
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Old 11th Feb 2024, 22:16
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Originally Posted by night mission
As mentioned in an earlier post, only 3rd class required in the USA.
That was wrong then and it's still wrong now. NO medical is required to instruct in USA unless the instructor is required act as pilot in command and needs a medical certification of some sort to be pilot in command. Even then basic med will often be sufficient.

Instructing in gliders requires no medical certification even if the instructor is pilot in command. Instructing in SEL requires no medical if the "student" is current and qualified to be PIC. So, no medical needed for flight reviews, tail wheel instruction, tow pilot training, jump pilot training, aerobatic instruction, commercial instruction in TAA, etc as long as the "student" has privilege to act as PIC and is qualified to act as PIC.




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Old 12th Feb 2024, 07:33
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That's yet another example of different rules either side of the pond. In the UK, whilst giving instruction (demonstrative or verbal), the instructor is pilot in command and the pilot flying logs pilot under training.
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Old 12th Feb 2024, 07:35
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And hence with will come the doubters.
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Old 11th Mar 2024, 12:36
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Originally Posted by Mach Jump

You may have a 'valid' MEP, and an IR with a Class 2 Medical, but, although you may have a CPL, it is not considered 'valid' by the CAA, unless you have a Class 1 medical to go with it.

I can teach a PPL student steep turns, stalling, navigation, etc. with a Class 2, but to give the same training to someone who already has a PPL, for the purpose of gaining a CPL, I need a Class 1.

No safety case whatsoever.

It just multiplies my medical expenditure by about 4 times for absolutely no reason.


MJ
MJ at least you can hold a Class One.

And of course the person you are teaching for the CPL would have a far better chance of a successful return to base than the trial flight.
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Old 11th Mar 2024, 19:09
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Originally Posted by Mickey Kaye
MJ at least you can hold a Class One.

And of course the person you are teaching for the CPL would have a far better chance of a successful return to base than the trial flight.

That is why with a class 2 and FI(A) with commercial theory only, PPL you can teach the first part of the syllabus if your student is doing his modular ATPL where he gets a licence every step of the way,

But for a student that is doing the identical first part of the syllabus at an integrated school where he will gain his frozen ATPL licnece at the end, you will need a full CPL or frozen ATPL plus a class 1.

This is how the cookie crumbles...
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Old 12th Mar 2024, 14:08
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Originally Posted by sixgee
Another couple of questions . It seems that a Stress ECG and a cardiology report is required for a Class One medical post 65. How often does this have to be done?
How long is a Class One medical valid for instructional purposes only post 65? 6 months?
sixgee
The Stress ECG lasts for four years and the Class 1 Certificate six months
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 15:58
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Originally Posted by markkal
That is why with a class 2 and FI(A) with commercial theory only, PPL you can teach the first part of the syllabus if your student is doing his modular ATPL where he gets a licence every step of the way,

But for a student that is doing the identical first part of the syllabus at an integrated school where he will gain his frozen ATPL licnece at the end, you will need a full CPL or frozen ATPL plus a class 1.

This is how the cookie crumbles...
Unless you are an FAA instructor teaching integrated students for CAA/EASA CPL issue in the US in which case all you need is a Class 3.
A lot of instructors give up at 60 and 65 because holding a Class 1 is too onerous. But they would be able to carry on the same instruction in the US.
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Old 13th Mar 2024, 16:38
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Originally Posted by 18greens
Unless you are an FAA instructor teaching integrated students for CAA/EASA CPL issue in the US in which case all you need is a Class 3.
I am a current FAA flight instructor resident in USA. I was not aware that I could teach " integrated students for CAA/EASA CPL issue". What regulation authorizes me to do that?
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