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EASA License flying N Reg

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EASA License flying N Reg

Old 18th May 2016, 14:16
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EASA License flying N Reg

Hi All,
Can a pilot holding a EASA licence fly an N reg aeroplane within UK and European airspace?
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Old 18th May 2016, 14:48
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If you have a UK issued EASA licence you can fly N reg in UK airspace only.
It may change one day.
Easiest way around the problem is to get an FAA 61.75 certificate (piggyback) or full FAA certificate.
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Old 19th May 2016, 12:56
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What D.O. has stated above is correct. The legal interpretations from the FAA Office of the Chief Counsel are here:

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/...rpretation.pdf

and

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/...rpretation.pdf

ifitaint...
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Old 19th May 2016, 15:58
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As there is no "EASA license", but only country licenses according to the same EASA scheme, you can fly N-reg aircraft with the respective license only in the country the license was issued. There ain't no EASA country ...
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Old 19th May 2016, 16:56
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Talking about this, can someone guide me or recommend me any place in UK or EU to get an FAA 61.75 certificate (piggyback) or full FAA certificate.

Thanks
(you can PM in order not to divert the topic)
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Old 19th May 2016, 20:32
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Talking about this, can someone guide me or recommend me any place in UK or EU to get an FAA 61.75 certificate (piggyback) or full FAA certificate.

Thanks
(you can PM in order not to divert the topic)
Call Adam House in Derbyshire: FAA recognizes Adam House
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Old 20th May 2016, 08:54
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Flying a G registered a/c with a South African ATPL

Hi all,
I have a similar query-
Can i fly a G reg aircraft with a South African Atpl, outside UK or South Africa, in an ICAO member state for part 121 ops?
Your input will be much appreciated,
Thanks.
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Old 20th May 2016, 12:24
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The ability to fly another country's aircraft with an ICAO licence issued by another State is only recommended by ICAO for non-commercial operations.

You can fly a Annex II (non EASA) G Reg in accordance with Article 62 of the UK ANO, and an EASA G-Reg in accordance with ORS4 No1163 for non commercial (private) flights.
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Old 20th May 2016, 21:39
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Can a NPPL fly a N reg aircraft he owns?
Can someone be taught NPPL on N reg using a EASA UK Instructor?
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Old 20th May 2016, 21:50
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airgus - the place to look is .... PPRuNe. But use the search function. The 61.75 has been done to death on here. As has the route to getting a full FAA certificate, which, in short requires you to meet all the part 61 requirements for initial issue of a certificate.

And to answer the original post - day vfr only
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Old 20th May 2016, 22:20
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Can a NPPL fly a N reg aircraft he owns?
The answer is: yes. This question was asked of the FAA by the UK CAA, along with enquiring about all other sub-ICAO licences and ratings including the LAPL and IMC/IR(R). The FAA response from the Office of the Chief Counsel is here:

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/...rpretation.pdf

which led to the answer in the NPPL FAQ here.

Can someone be taught NPPL on N reg using a EASA UK Instructor?
Dual training may be carried out since the UK instructor may exercise their privileges in accordance with 14 CFR 61.3, but the student would not be able to complete the solo flying on a N-reg since they are not a licence holder at that point nor do they hold the required FAA license or student pilot certificate.

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Old 21st May 2016, 08:24
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ifitaint, if the instructor was to be remunerated for flight instruction given to an aircraft owner on an N-reg aircraft in the UK, presumably there's still a requirement for the aircraft owner to have obtained the necessary permit for the aircraft from the CAA?
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Old 21st May 2016, 08:46
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Aircraft not registered in the EEA may only to be used for aerial work such as parachute dropping, crop spraying, banner towing, aerial display or flight training[1] in the UK where the operator (or flying instructor) does not receive valuable consideration for his services or holds a permit under Article 225 of the Air Navigation Order 2009. Details here
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Old 21st May 2016, 12:35
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That's correct, although Article 225 was included in the recent ANO Review for amendment. In my experience, the CAA have already started to apply this new policy by stating that an individual Article 225 exemption is not now required to be issued for flight training and testing.

ifitaint...
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Old 27th May 2016, 22:56
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ANO Review CRD now published.

http://publicapps.caa.co.uk/docs/33/...view%20CRD.pdf

Page 12 for detail on future ANO Article 225 permissions.

ifitaint...
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Old 7th Dec 2016, 12:43
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From the discussion above, I was not able to understand if flying an N-reg aircraft in one own country (France for example) was only permitted in VFR or if Night VFR or IFR was also possible, assuming one is EASA (French DGAC) IR rated.

Anyone to shed some light on this ?
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Old 7th Dec 2016, 17:14
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FAA rules permit you to operate an N Reg in any State using a Licence issued by that State. It places no limitations other than those included on the licence being used. So if you can fly IFR in France that is good in an N Reg.
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Old 7th Dec 2016, 23:23
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... no limitations other than those included on the licence being used.
This requirement mentioned by Whopity is prescribed in 14 CFR 61.75(e)(3) which states that the certificate holder (bold added):

14 CFR 61.75(e)(3) Is subject to the limitations and restrictions on the person's U.S. certificate and foreign pilot license when exercising the privileges of that U.S. pilot certificate in an aircraft of U.S. registry operating within or outside the United States[.]
It's worth mentioning that this regulation is commonly believed to mean that a US airman certificate issued under 61.75 is subject to the flight crew licensing rules governing the non-US licence, e.g. Part-FCL. The August 2008 AAIB Bulletin at p 80, reporting on a nosewheel collapse on a Nomad whose captain held a US airman certificate issued under 61.75, cites the above FAR in support of this misconception. The FAA Office of the Chief Counsel provided a legal interpretation on the point in March 2012 to Andrew Krausz at Clyde & Co. Addressing the bulletin FAA states:

The AAIB draws the conclusion from this provision that any and all limitations and and restrictions that a pilot would be subject to under his foreign pilot certificate are incorporated in his US certificate, and apply equally under his US certificate. This conclusion is mistaken.
The interpretation goes on to state:

... the pilot is subject to the restrictions and limitations that appear on the face of the US certificate or foreign pilot license. This language does not include the entirety of regulatory requirements of the foreign State since the holder of the 61.75 certificate is bound by the US regulatory requirements to exercise the privileges of the US certificate. The FAA views that language as addressing the limitations of the sort FAA uses, e.g., "not valid for night operation," where the individual has not completed the night training requirements.
The 2012 interpretation to Krausz is at https://www.faa.gov/about/office_org...rpretation.pdf
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Old 8th Dec 2016, 00:06
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As I understand it tipech is referring to the holder of a National Licence operating under CFR61.3 without being the holder of a CFR61.75 Certificate.
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Old 8th Dec 2016, 17:30
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Indeed, I did not have the CFR reference to quote. So even without a piggy-back licence (CFR61.75), my french licence allows me to fly above France on a N-Reg aircraft in IFR, and even being paid as I own a french CPL : just great..

Thanks for your explanations.
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