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Canadian citizenship in canadian aviation

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Canadian citizenship in canadian aviation

Old 29th May 2019, 23:44
  #1 (permalink)  
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Canadian citizenship in canadian aviation

Hi everybody, i am tunisian living in france and i am 28 years old . I want To move to canada and after getting my PR maybe i Will study aviation and become a pilot . But i am not sure if regional canadian airlines hire only canadian citizens or a permanent residence is enough to get a first officer job in jazz, encore , porter ...etc . I am asking this question because i was studying engineering in the last years, and if the canadian citizenship is necessary, i will go back to university and not waste my time . I will be thankful for your replies . 😊😊😊😊

Last edited by Futurepilot1991; 30th May 2019 at 01:41.
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Old 30th May 2019, 01:09
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Join Date: Nov 2003
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Canada is not like other countries. You do not come out of flight school into an airline, yet. You'll have to work at least one job before the airlines will hire you. That's the aviation part. The right to work is a different government department and different rules so I can offer no advice there.

http://www.letmegooglethat.com/?q=Ho...an+citizenship
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Old 30th May 2019, 01:15
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Yes of course , i need to build time as a Flight instructor and then i can apply for FO jobs . I hope that airlines dont require citizenship line in europe .and Thank you btw
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Old 30th May 2019, 04:50
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PR card is fine. I flew with numerous immigrants that only had a PR card. You can work at a regional no problem.
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Old 30th May 2019, 14:44
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How good are chances to score in the regionals for an F/O with 900+ TT (some airline time included)?
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Old 30th May 2019, 16:39
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Originally Posted by fuelsurvey View Post
PR card is fine. I flew with numerous immigrants that only had a PR card. You can work at a regional no problem.
Thank you 😊😊😊 good news
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Old 30th May 2019, 17:59
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Most of the airlines and regionals use a points system to decide if they will interview. I'm not sure of the details of the system but it is something like this:

Degree = X points
Hours = X points
Multi hours = X points
Scheduled airline experience = X points
Etc... you get the idea.

When you hit the magic number your resume pops up to the top of the list and they call you for an interview. At that point it's how well you can lie in an interview room.

Charter companies and corporate companies use their own methods and each one is a little different.

Perhaps a little asking at the various companies might give you a better idea of what matrix they are using and if you will fit the mix.
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Old 31st May 2019, 09:32
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Originally Posted by Mostly Harmless View Post
Most of the airlines and regionals use a points system to decide if they will interview.

Perhaps a little asking at the various companies might give you a better idea of what matrix they are using and if you will fit the mix.
Mostly H,

That's certainly correct but all indications are the process and criteria are closely guarded secrets. You'll learn the nuclear launch codes before you actually known how these companies select and hire.

Lots of opinions around but we are destined to be The Blind Men and the Elephant where this information is concerned. Interesting (and important) subject for sure.

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Old 31st May 2019, 10:14
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Originally Posted by Mostly Harmless View Post
Most of the airlines and regionals use a points system to decide if they will interview. I'm not sure of the details of the system but it is something like this:

Degree = X points
Hours = X points
Multi hours = X points
Scheduled airline experience = X points
Etc... you get the idea.

When you hit the magic number your resume pops up to the top of the list and they call you for an interview. At that point it's how well you can lie in an interview room.

Charter companies and corporate companies use their own methods and each one is a little different.

Perhaps a little asking at the various companies might give you a better idea of what matrix they are using and if you will fit the mix.
The breakdown actually makes sense.
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Old 31st May 2019, 16:42
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Join Date: Oct 2007
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How good are chances to score in the regionals for an F/O with 900+ TT (some airline time included)?
Depends on the person really.

I've interviewed and trained pilots who could fly circles around me but I could smell the BS every time they opened their mouths. I've also interviewed and trained other pilots who could not keep the airplane straight and level but were genuinely nice people, tried hard every day, and put everything they had into their improvement. This applies to pilots with 900 hours just as much as those with 9000 hours.

The airline I work for does have a matrix like that described by Mostly Harmless, but it's not a points-based system. It's either you have the minimum experience levels or you don't. If you do, you're generally given the chance to interview. Something akin to "it's your job to lose."

Because of this, we put a lot of stock into the interview process and the opinion of our current employees. I know one or two people who admitted to having a horrendous interview, but enough people within the company vouched for them and they were given a position. I also know of some really experienced pilots who interviewed well, but their internal references were not stellar or otherwise told a different story than the applicant was telling.

When I was hiring, I would ask myself one question of everyone I'd interview - would I enjoy spending 4 days with this person or would I rather gouge out my eyes with a rusty nail that had been sitting in a pig pen. If it's the former, you'd likely get the nod and I'd let training see if you were up to the task. If it was the latter, it would be a big, fat no. Most interviewers are easy to get along with when line flying, so if we don't think we'd want to spend a 4-day pairing with you, then the line pilot with very strong opinions of him or herself and the company will certainly let us know their feelings on the matter.

But what are your chances? If you meet the minimum requirements and have a good attitude, pretty good right now.
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Old 4th Jun 2019, 21:14
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Originally Posted by +TSRA View Post
Depends on the person really.

I've interviewed and trained pilots who could fly circles around me but I could smell the BS every time they opened their mouths. I've also interviewed and trained other pilots who could not keep the airplane straight and level but were genuinely nice people, tried hard every day, and put everything they had into their improvement. This applies to pilots with 900 hours just as much as those with 9000 hours.

The airline I work for does have a matrix like that described by Mostly Harmless, but it's not a points-based system. It's either you have the minimum experience levels or you don't. If you do, you're generally given the chance to interview. Something akin to "it's your job to lose."

Because of this, we put a lot of stock into the interview process and the opinion of our current employees. I know one or two people who admitted to having a horrendous interview, but enough people within the company vouched for them and they were given a position. I also know of some really experienced pilots who interviewed well, but their internal references were not stellar or otherwise told a different story than the applicant was telling.

When I was hiring, I would ask myself one question of everyone I'd interview - would I enjoy spending 4 days with this person or would I rather gouge out my eyes with a rusty nail that had been sitting in a pig pen. If it's the former, you'd likely get the nod and I'd let training see if you were up to the task. If it was the latter, it would be a big, fat no. Most interviewers are easy to get along with when line flying, so if we don't think we'd want to spend a 4-day pairing with you, then the line pilot with very strong opinions of him or herself and the company will certainly let us know their feelings on the matter.

But what are your chances? If you meet the minimum requirements and have a good attitude, pretty good right now.
Good to hear from you sir ! Been long.
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Old 8th Jun 2019, 01:58
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Hi again 😉, how many years it takes to become an a320 or b737 pilot in canada after getting the first pilot job of course
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Old 5th Jul 2019, 13:18
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Futurepilot1991
I’d recommend, to save time, that you drop into the local Canadian Consulate or Embassy and speak directly with an immigration officer to put yourself on the most accurate and efficient path to entering Canada legally. Pilots on this forum aren’t likely to be conversant with our immigration and right to work legislation or processes. (I know I’m not) In fact, if you’re near Paris, pop into the Quebec Consulate (assuming vous parle francais) for a more rapid entry into Canada.
The pilot jobs over here aren’t that impressive and take a lot of networking. So, the quickest way to get any pilot position in Canada is to do it legally and establish a nepotism network ASAP.
Bon chance.
Willie Everlearn
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Old 5th Jul 2019, 15:29
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Originally Posted by Willie Everlearn View Post
In fact, if you’re near Paris, pop into the Quebec Consulate (assuming vous parle francais) for a more rapid entry into Canada.
Treason! Quebec is not yet a separate country, they cannot have a consulate in Paris!!!

(They do have a délégation générale there).
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Old 5th Jul 2019, 16:25
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Quite right,
but...
https://www.international.gouv.qc.ca/fr/paris/immigrer
Quebec Embassy, Quebec Consulate, Quebec Mission, Quebec Government Office, délégation générale, call it anything you like, it’s still an end run around Canadian immigration wherever you apply.
It’s an exercise in their sovereignty. Distinct society.
Malheureusement, nous avons peu de choix au Québec.

Willie
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Old 6th Jul 2019, 20:51
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Originally Posted by Willie Everlearn View Post
Futurepilot1991
I’d recommend, to save time, that you drop into the local Canadian Consulate or Embassy and speak directly with an immigration officer to put yourself on the most accurate and efficient path to entering Canada legally. Pilots on this forum aren’t likely to be conversant with our immigration and right to work legislation or processes. (I know I’m not) In fact, if you’re near Paris, pop into the Quebec Consulate (assuming vous parle francais) for a more rapid entry into Canada.
The pilot jobs over here aren’t that impressive and take a lot of networking. So, the quickest way to get any pilot position in Canada is to do it legally and establish a nepotism network ASAP.
Bon chance.
Willie Everlearn
thanks for this advice, i will check it with an embassy agent because i want to start this career with the right way . So my question is : If i am a flight instructor in canada with 1000 hours having . the right to work and live in canada permanently, how much is my chances to get a regional pilot job ( i speak both english and french) .
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Old 8th Jul 2019, 13:04
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Originally Posted by Futurepilot1991 View Post
thanks for this advice, i will check it with an embassy agent because i want to start this career with the right way . So my question is : If i am a flight instructor in canada with 1000 hours having . the right to work and live in canada permanently, how much is my chances to get a regional pilot job ( i speak both english and french) .
Right to work in Canada, 1000 hours, fluent English and French, virtually 100% you will be hired by Jazz or one of the other regionals on the current and foreseeable job market.
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Old 8th Jul 2019, 15:31
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Originally Posted by altiplano View Post
Right to work in Canada, 1000 hours, fluent English and French, virtually 100% you will be hired by Jazz or one of the other regionals on the current and foreseeable job market.
thanks a lot . I am glad to hear these good news
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 01:35
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Hi again 😉, how many years it takes to become an a320 or b737 pilot in canada after getting the first pilot job of course
As far as this question is concerned, it depends on the airline(s) you apply to and how quickly you build time.

If you've got 1000 hours now, you'll be looking to log about another 1500 or so before a respectable medium jet operator (Air Canada, WestJet, Sunwing, Transat) would seriously entertain your application. Air Canada has a program set up with their Express carriers for movement to Big Red that could get you in the door quicker. Jazz has the biggest part of that pie and that is likely your best bet in the short to medium term to build time and get to narrow body somewhat quickly. The ALPA teams at WestJet and Encore are trying to figure out how to bring a version of their One-List back into play and if that does come back, that could make for an attractive spot as it has the potential to carry seniority over, which the AC system does not. It wouldn't be anywhere near as quick as the AC system, but it has the potential of carrying seniority, which as you will learn is more important in the long run. Speaking French darned near makes your resume gold for Transat, and Sunwing is a great spot if you're single and able to go to Europe during the summer. Even if you're not single, I know people who've moved their families over during the summer and they live the renting lifestyle.

Either way, don't wait for something "better" to come along if you're applying to multiple places. Apply to where you want to work first and if you don't hear back, apply to the places you're willing to work at. The train could stop tomorrow and you want to make sure you've got a good seat when it does.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 07:17
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Originally Posted by +TSRA View Post
As far as this question is concerned, it depends on the airline(s) you apply to and how quickly you build time.

If you've got 1000 hours now, you'll be looking to log about another 1500 or so before a respectable medium jet operator (Air Canada, WestJet, Sunwing, Transat) would seriously entertain your application. Air Canada has a program set up with their Express carriers for movement to Big Red that could get you in the door quicker. Jazz has the biggest part of that pie and that is likely your best bet in the short to medium term to build time and get to narrow body somewhat quickly. The ALPA teams at WestJet and Encore are trying to figure out how to bring a version of their One-List back into play and if that does come back, that could make for an attractive spot as it has the potential to carry seniority over, which the AC system does not. It wouldn't be anywhere near as quick as the AC system, but it has the potential of carrying seniority, which as you will learn is more important in the long run. Speaking French darned near makes your resume gold for Transat, and Sunwing is a great spot if you're single and able to go to Europe during the summer. Even if you're not single, I know people who've moved their families over during the summer and they live the renting lifestyle.

Either way, don't wait for something "better" to come along if you're applying to multiple places. Apply to where you want to work first and if you don't hear back, apply to the places you're willing to work at. The train could stop tomorrow and you want to make sure you've got a good seat when it does.
Thank you for all these informations 👍👍👍
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