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CPL Flight Test Items

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CPL Flight Test Items

Old 11th Mar 2016, 01:38
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 18
CPL Flight Test Items

Hi guys,
As i'm studying hard for my commercial flight test which will probably be the end of this month, i got the TC Commercial flight test guide and i would like to get some additional informations concerning all the ground items covered during the ground test such as;

1/ Ensure that flight authorization is confirmed and encompasses the requirements of the proposed flight in accordance with the applicable operational control system;

2/ Determine if the required documents on board are valid;

3/ Determine if the maintenance release ensures aeroplane serviceability and currency of inspection for the proposed period of flight;

4/ Determine the remaining number of flying hours before the next service or maintenance task;

5/ Ensure that any conditions or limitations on the maintenance release can be complied with;

6/ Determine the impact of deferred defects on aeroplane operations for the proposed flight;

7/ Explain the process for dealing with aeroplane unserviceabilities discovered during a flight.


I would be very grateful if you could provide me with any additional information.

Thanks
lukyduky81 is offline  
Old 11th Mar 2016, 04:52
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Wherever I go, there I am
Age: 40
Posts: 715
Hi lukyduky81,

First...All of these are items you would have had to demonstrate during your PPL, so if you haven't been doing this during your hour building and your instructor has not called you out on it...not good. Kudos, however, for picking up the flight test guide. I had one too many students wonder why I wouldn't sign their recommend when they asked "what's that?" when I pulled it out. I finally learned to bring it up on day one rather than hope they would.

At any rate, here is my 2c:

1/ Ensure that flight authorization is confirmed and encompasses the requirements of the proposed flight in accordance with the applicable operational control system;
They're looking to see if you know how the flight school authorizes you to go flying. Normally its a sign-out sheet that you fill the details of the flight and an instructor counter-signs. If you're still not sure, only your instructor can answer fully because it differs between each flight school. But knowing about flight authorizations and the operational control system is a HUGE part of commercial and airline flying.

2/ Determine if the required documents on board are valid;
AROWJELI my friend:

Certificate of Airworthiness
Certificate of Registration
Owners Manual (POH, AFM, etc.)
Weight and Balance (that you've completed it)
Journey Log
Emergency Procedures (may be part of the POH/AFM or may be a QRH)
Licences (yours, radio licences, if required, etc.)
Insurance documents

I'm sure there are other ways of remembering it, but this is what I've used for 16 years now.

3/ Determine if the maintenance release ensures aeroplane serviceability and currency of inspection for the proposed period of flight;
Does the Journey Log have any outstanding maintenance items? Does the approval to fly with the defect have enough hours for your flight. Depending upon your school this may be written on or in the journey log or may be a separate document altogether.

4/ Determine the remaining number of flying hours before the next service or maintenance task;
This is where you need to look at what maintenance tasks are coming up and whether the number of hours on the aircraft or engine allow you to go flying. For example, an engine inspection is due in 1.5 hours. You want to do a flight that is 2 hours long. You can't go because you'll end up 0.5 hours over the next maintenance task.

5/ Ensure that any conditions or limitations on the maintenance release can be complied with;
This is kind of the same as question 3. If there are limitations or deferrals imposed by maintenance, can you comply with them? For example, they take out a landing light. When do you need the landing light? Night ops. So can you now fly at night? No.

6/ Determine the impact of deferred defects on aeroplane operations for the proposed flight;
This is another big one that relates to questions 3 and 5. What impact does the removal of an item have on your flight. See the landing light example above, but in the commercial world we have things known as MELs (Minimum Equipment Lists) and CDLs (Configuration Deviation Lists) that let us know the impact the removal has. We then have to determine how many deferrals we are comfortable to fly with. Most training aircraft don't have an MEL or CDL, so it is up to you to determine the impact a deferral has.

7/ Explain the process for dealing with aeroplane unserviceabilities discovered during a flight.
So they're asking you what you would do if something broke during flight. They're not getting at serious failures (engine, landing gear, etc.) but minor things - you lose one radio, you lose the GPS, your airspeed indicator becomes blocked. In other words, how do you manage something breaking while at the same time you balance flying the aircraft, talking on the radio, briefing your passengers, etc.

This only scratches the surface of possible answers and I'm sure you'll get others. Just remember that the CPL is only a licence to learn. You'll feel like the king of the world once you have it, but you've still a lot to learn afterwards. I still learn something new every day and I'm 7 years as a training and simulator pilot. All the examiner is looking for is that you can manage the aircraft and you're not going to kill people. If they would let their family fly with you, you've already passed.

The best advice I was ever given about the CPL was given to me as I walked out of the room with my licence recently stamped...my instructor told me the CPL was a professional certificate similar to a Bachelors Degree. He continued to say that people expect you to act professionally, but they all know there are two more levels to "expert." So act like a professional and be ready to learn everything all over again.

Good luck.
+TSRA is offline  
Old 11th Mar 2016, 11:13
  #3 (permalink)  
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Join Date: May 2015
Location: Toronto, Canada
Posts: 18
@ +TSRA ...I cannot thank you enough for these priceless info, I'll consider every word written.
lukyduky81 is offline  

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