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Stinson running adjustment

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Stinson running adjustment

Old 13th Aug 2019, 03:41
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Stinson running adjustment

I'm not sure which forum this belongs in but it seems historical:
Does anyone have an idea of what is being done in this picture?
I cannot find the original photo on the net.
The aircraft is a Stinson Junior, and there seems to be some
form of grab rail fitted over the cowl, and a 'platform' either side of the nose
that the brave 'mechanic' is lying on.



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Old 13th Aug 2019, 04:08
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Perhaps this one on a test flight?

SM-4 Junior 1929 = 2pChwM rg; 300hp Wright R-975. POP: 1 special retractable-gear endurance plane Sally Sovereign developed from SM-1 [X9696]. Damaged in a wheels-up landing after a failed endurance flight (p: Eddie Stinson, Randolph Page). Rebuilt with fixed gear as K of New Haven for an aborted attempt at a US-Argentina non-stop flight on 7/15/30, when the crew became lost in a fog over Georgia and ran out of gas. They bailed out and SM-4 crashed to destruction.

Stinson
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 08:43
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Not a Junior - it's the SM-1 Detroiter "City of Chicago" used by the Hunter brothers for their 1930 endurance record flight:

https://www.criticalpast.com/video/6...unter-brothers
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 08:57
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There is more than one photograph of that event.


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Old 13th Aug 2019, 09:03
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Here's another.


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Old 13th Aug 2019, 09:22
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Had a flight in the right hand seat of an SM-8 Junior about 20 years ago, glad I wasn't asked to do whatever he was doing...
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 09:30
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What he was doing is captioned in my post #4 above.
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 09:38
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Thanks, missed your first pic on me phone...! And Dave's post 3.
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 11:09
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Originally Posted by dook View Post
What he was doing is captioned in my post #4 above.
I'm struggling to understand how the the intrepid gentleman was able to change the spark plugs with the engine running?
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 11:23
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I wondered about that too, but it seems they did.
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 11:33
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Yet another:


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Old 13th Aug 2019, 13:14
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Thanks everyone.
It appears that this was such a common, and indeed necessary, procedure that the 'access frames' and grab rail were fitted for the purpose of allowing a passenger (hopefully!) to carry out this work. I still find it hard to believe that a spark plug can be changed on a running engine, having witnessed the result of one unscrewing to the end of its thread and zipping off over a hedge, never to be found again- I was following a BSA 441 Victor at some speed many years ago.
Regards, Weeds
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 13:20
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It wasn't a passenger.
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 13:23
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Oh, and thanks Dave Reid: I can see now that the large hatch/hole behind the cockpit was where the in-flight refuelling hose was dropped into (and probably food and drink too). I presume that the PNF had to catch hold of it and connect the end to a fitting on a fuel line to the tanks. Brave aviators!
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 13:33
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Where was the Health & Safety manager when all this was going on....???!!!
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 13:37
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Flying the aeroplane !
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Old 13th Aug 2019, 22:00
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Originally Posted by Weeds round the prop View Post
I still find it hard to believe that a spark plug can be changed on a running engine, having witnessed the result of one unscrewing to the end of its thread and zipping off over a hedge, never to be found again-
A largish radial will continue running even if one cylinder isn't cooperating. So if you pull off the lead(s) for one pot at a time, you should be able to change the plug(s) that way. The difficult part is probably getting the new plug in without dropping it
Not saying I'd like to take on the job though....

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Old 14th Aug 2019, 02:42
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Changing plugs? Poor maintenance, what about the timing, tappets, oil change.

You're an ace Dave with that link.

Hand starting.

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Old 14th Aug 2019, 08:32
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But how do you push a spark plug into its fitting in the cilinder head against the pressure of the cilinder coming up? That's a pressure in the order of 5 or 6 atmosphere, leading to force of around 40 to 70 kgf (500 N methink), depending on the diameter of the spark plug.
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Old 14th Aug 2019, 09:59
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Originally Posted by washoutt View Post
But how do you push a spark plug into its fitting in the cilinder head against the pressure of the cilinder coming up? That's a pressure in the order of 5 or 6 atmosphere, leading to force of around 40 to 70 kgf (500 N methink), depending on the diameter of the spark plug.
Time it so that you screw it in on the down-stroke.

Joking aside, I was wondering how they would do that too, and also how they would reach all 9 cylinder heads.

Not to mention how much/little clearance there was between the forward plugs and the prop ...
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