Australia, New Zealand & the Pacific Airline and RPT Rumours & News in Australia, enZed and the Pacific

Launy for QF Training School

Old 9th May 2018, 02:44
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Can't go past Tamworth I reckon. ILS, Facilities in place, Good weather etc.
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Old 9th May 2018, 05:15
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Alpha Whiskey Bravo View Post
Can't go past Tamworth I reckon. ILS, Facilities in place, Good weather etc.
I totally agree. With the RAAF moving its ab-initio training to East Sale, there is going to be a lot of unused infrastructure at Tamworth airport.

Qantas will use all the other councils as a bargaining chip to get the best deal, but, with all the infrastructure (& some instructors) already in place, they could be up and running almost immediately.

When you add the Tamworth weather into the equation, I would be very surprised if it went anywhere else.
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Old 9th May 2018, 10:16
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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And it's close to SYD!
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Old 9th May 2018, 14:03
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Originally Posted by Traffic_Is_Er_Was View Post
And it's close to SYD!
And Qantas has a training base there years ago, that is where the DC-3s were more or less based.
Tootle pip!!
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Old 9th May 2018, 23:20
  #25 (permalink)  
Keg

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I originally thought as you did Going Boeing. I did hear a rumour though that when Joyce was undergoing treatment for prostrate cancer that he was there at the same time with one of the family members responsible for Wellcamp and that a friendship was struck up and that their ‘can do’ attitude may see the training facilities established there. Not for $20 mill mind you, they’d need a truck load more than that for a green fields site.
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Old 10th May 2018, 03:30
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Originally Posted by Keg View Post
I originally thought as you did Going Boeing. I did hear a rumour though that when Joyce was undergoing treatment for prostrate cancer that he was there at the same time with one of the family members responsible for Wellcamp and that a friendship was struck up and that their Ďcan doí attitude may see the training facilities established there. Not for $20 mill mind you, theyíd need a truck load more than that for a green fields site.
Keg there are already training facilities up there in the form of the building that the AAA (Royal Qld Aero Club) were using for their Airline cadets. Maybe you might be on to something.
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Old 10th May 2018, 03:36
  #27 (permalink)  
Keg

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Easily scaleable to cope with up to 500 trainees AWB?

Can anyone realistically view any single training provider in Australia coping with 40 new trainees every month of the year? Aeroplanes? Instructors? LAMEs? Ground Instructors?

It'll be awesome if they can make it work but it's a scale that Australia has never seen. Even at it's peak in the early '90s the Australian Aviation College (now Flight Training Adelaide) struggled to get more than about 180 through in any one year.
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Old 10th May 2018, 03:54
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Whoever told Alan Joyce 500 a year was doable gave him really bad advice. Across 10 other large schools possible, but something the size of what would be needed for 500 a year would take way more than $20Mill to get started. Where will they find the Instructors to start with?
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Old 10th May 2018, 04:11
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They can pay me what they pay me to fly and I'll happily become a full time GR1 again, even have ATO approvals. Home every night. Perfect. Oh, they want to pay the award? Bwahahahah. Good luck.
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Old 11th May 2018, 00:57
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The powers at be probably wouldnít like the truth bombs Keg and others are dropping here. It kinda smells like RedQ....if they do manage it at some point it wonít be in 12 months time.
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Old 11th May 2018, 01:10
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It's just what business's do in the modern era. They make unrealistic aspirational statements, as a lofty goal rather than some realistic target. This then inspires ' 'enablers' to move the project along.

The thing is now that the financial press don't actually do any journalism, including the ABC, so nothing any business actually says gets challenged. So when it all falls in a heap they will just move onto the next project and all is forgotten. As long as you don't end up in a royal commission or go broke it's all good.
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Old 11th May 2018, 03:15
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Originally Posted by neville_nobody View Post
It's just what business's do in the modern era. They make unrealistic aspirational statements, as a lofty goal rather than some realistic target. This then inspires ' 'enablers' to move the project along.

The thing is now that the financial press don't actually do any journalism, including the ABC, so nothing any business actually says gets challenged. So when it all falls in a heap they will just move onto the next project and all is forgotten. As long as you don't end up in a royal commission or go broke it's all good.
Agree. Think Red Q, Jetstar Hong Kong. Grand visions with no execution.
Unless they pay mega bucks they are not going to attract instructors.
Qantas wont want to pay for it and it wont be ready in time or of a big enough scale as others have said.
When you have a SH EBA and a LH eba coming up its a great thing to threaten with an obvious shortage.
Emirates canít get pilots or Training pilots and are cancelling flights now.
Alan would be livid that pilots are in a strong bargaining position. Sadly AIPA lack conviction and strong leadership and the pilots are not confident so I doubt much will be achieved in the largest shortage in history. Like to say Iím wrong but a great majority would take a pay cut just for a new toy.
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Old 11th May 2018, 03:35
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https://www.qantasnewsroom.com.au/me...pilot-academy/

It is expected the Academy will employ more than 40 people in training and support roles, and partner with local businesses and suppliers to support key administrative and catering functions, providing new opportunities to drive economic activity in regional Australia from 2019.
Aiming to train 100 pilots in the first year (2019-2020) when only a 'formal process' for regional cities and states to apply, is being announced today.

They will need more than 40 staff.

Tell 'em they're dreaming!

Last edited by DynamicStall; 11th May 2018 at 06:28.
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Old 11th May 2018, 04:13
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One would be well versed reading the very small print. 'Return of Service Obligations', 'located at company priority' and 'release subject to operational requirements' likely to feature in the fine print. Caveat Emptor! Should this yet to be located, built, staffed and equipped school operate, the focus for Qantas 'group' will be the lack of suitable applicants in both regional and 'subsidiary' airlines. A Jetconnect base and flying in Australia is a nice circumvention of the existing agreements we would postulate.A sturdy stream lead will have their hand firmly on..the tiller

Qantas has been 'terminal', 'transformed', needing AUD $3 billion government assistance, starting JQ HK, having 400 JQ aircraft by 2020 and even Red Q (which never was settled as to whether it would be in Malaysia or Singapore) all in the tenure of one little Napoleon.

With anything Mr Joyce says Give weight to actions, but heavily discount his words.
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Old 11th May 2018, 04:18
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Im curious as to the cost to the cadet and how it compares to the VA cadetship program.
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Old 11th May 2018, 05:37
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Originally Posted by Rated De View Post
One would be well versed reading the very small print. 'Return of Service Obligations', 'located at company priority' and 'release subject to operational requirements' likely to feature in the fine print.
Isnít a bonding obligation only for those whoíve had their company foot the bill for their training? I canít see any airline requiring the students to pay for their own training but then having to enter an obligation with financial penalties if they donít remain with the airline?

British Airways will pay back the entire cost of training their cadets (£84k) if they remain with the airline for 7 years. Aer Lingus and Air France sponsor their student pilot training completely. If imagine thereíd be a minimum employment obligation but when youíve had the bill for your flying training covered I donít think too many students would be complaining.

If I was a recent high school grad or uni student I donít think Iíd be too concerned with being ďforcedĒ to fly a Q400 for a number of years with training paid for either.
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Old 11th May 2018, 07:48
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Originally Posted by Duck Pilot View Post
Maybe a few other airports in Tasmania with Western Junction being the hub. Certainly no congestion problems in Tasmania and itís close enough to Victoria for advanced navigation excercises.

I thought Qantas built and still owns the hangar that Sharp Airlines currently use. Iím pretty sure that facility has lots of office and workshop space. Plenty of room for expansion down there and pretty good flying conditions for flight training around Launceston.
Workshop space is ok (just) but very short on office space. It would need considerable expansion to serve as a training establishment. Sharps currently leasing the facility and using it as there primary maintenance base as well as supporting operations out of there to Flinders and King Island.
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Old 11th May 2018, 09:09
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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When it was proposed to bulid the Ansett training college at Launceston, the Federal Airports Corporation planned to build a parallel runway complete with an ILS, remove the three grass runways and build the training/hangar complex on the eastern side of the airport.

Let the pork barrelling begin!
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Old 12th May 2018, 12:34
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Sandgropers are in on it... YCUN??!!

The West, 12 May 2018
WA Push To Land Qantas Pilot School
By Geoffrey Thomas, Aviation Editor
The State Government will set up a task force to try to lure the proposed Qantas Group Pilot Academy to WA. Qantas has issued a formal request for proposals from States and airports for the location of its new pilot training school, which the airline plans to open next year with an initial intake of 100 trainees. Eventually it plans to train 500 pilots a year for its own operations and those of other airlines.

Competition for the academy is expected to be intense from around the nation. But the WA Government believes that the State’s weather and more open airspace will be big advantages. Qantas requires 300 days of “flying weather” a year, the airline’s proposal says. It also requires an asphalt runway and taxiways with minimum runway length of 1300m, capability of full lighting for night and reduced-visibility operations and fuel tanker refuelling. Also on the list are hangars and covered facilities to accommodate maintenance and parking space for up to 30 planes, with the ability to expand to more than 50 planes. The Government’s task force will bring together tourism, transport and regional development to formalise WA’s comparative advantages for the facility. The task force will consider potential locations around the State as part of its investigation, including Busselton-Margaret River, Jandakot, Geraldton, Cunderdin and Albany.

The Government said that it would also continue to work closely with China Southern to support the existing China Southern WA Flying College in Merredin, as well as Singapore Airlines’ training operation at Jandakot.
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Old 12th May 2018, 23:52
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For a training school of any size you can rule out any airport that already has an airline training academy. After being at ymmb for a bit I have found that since the RA schools started up that an academy for 500 pilots really need their own runway access so the school isn't battling for circuit space. YMMB is basically at capacity now that it has 4 large schools.
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