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Totals 2019

Old 30th Dec 2019, 16:45
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 116
Originally Posted by VinRouge View Post
UK flag carrier
Virgin Atlantic?
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Old 30th Dec 2019, 17:02
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Globe
Posts: 11
EU Regional airline, 1st year F/O
43,000 € gross
550 hours year
Based in Spain.
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Old 30th Dec 2019, 17:13
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Under the table
Posts: 189
Originally Posted by zero/zero View Post
Virgin Atlantic?
Huge Network?
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Old 30th Dec 2019, 17:14
  #44 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: London
Posts: 108
Literally should be :
Name of Airline
Aircraft Type
Position
Salary
Days Off
Trips per month
Anything else interesting

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Old 30th Dec 2019, 17:43
  #45 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: EU
Posts: 19
KLM,
777/787
relief fo
750h
75.000gross +42%pension ectra
14days off average
3,5 trip
LOL is really good

-hotels could be better


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Old 30th Dec 2019, 18:00
  #46 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: I wouldn't know.
Posts: 4,068
EU LCC right hand seat, year 2 (albeit on year 5 pay), 101k gross, 66k net, 540 hours per year on a full time contract. Plus pension contributions of course, 174 days off including vacation.
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Old 30th Dec 2019, 18:21
  #47 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: In a house
Posts: 110
A330
First officer / relief captain.
EUR 90,000 gross basic pay, +/- EUR 20,000 allowances, up to EUR 15,500 bonuses + 35% pension
No short haul, minimum 2 days off after medium haul, minimum 4 after long haul.
2 - 8 trips per month.
46 days annual leave.
Normally 450 - 650 hours a year.
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Old 30th Dec 2019, 22:55
  #48 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: California
Posts: 235
Southwest
B-737 Captain
490 hours block
98 days worked plus 4 paid recurrent training days
$235,000 plus $35,000 to pension fund
Expect an additional 10-12% ($23,000-$27000) profit sharing added to pension fund

Note: I gave away trips. Base pay for a Captain is higher than my earnings.


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Old 31st Dec 2019, 12:04
  #49 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Hundred Acre Wood
Posts: 260
Big UK Airline
A320 FO
Part-time contract (3/4 of normal)
240 days off (average 10 days on/20 days off per month)
520 hours
Gross £58k (usually 15-20% higher but I didn't feel like "helping out" this year).

Interesting to compare to Denti who did similar hours on a full time contract but he/she earned more but had fewer days off.
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Old 31st Dec 2019, 12:55
  #50 (permalink)  

Only half a speed-brake
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Commuting home
Age: 42
Posts: 2,836
For the US salaries, what would be the coefficient from GROSS to NET ? Once you retire over there, would the medical insurance cover still continue?

Last edited by FlightDetent; 31st Dec 2019 at 14:53.
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Old 31st Dec 2019, 15:48
  #51 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Fl410
Posts: 64
German LCC RHS A320
first year FO
56000 before tax and roughly +6000 flight pay/away from base pay. No overtime, 400hrs on a fulltime contract
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Old 31st Dec 2019, 16:54
  #52 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Gold Coast
Posts: 60
Originally Posted by FlightDetent View Post
For the US salaries, what would be the coefficient from GROSS to NET ? Once you retire over there, would the medical insurance cover still continue?
my net will be around $217k on $335k gross. I live in California. The state of California got about 30% of those taxes paid and the federal government got the other 70%. California is a high-tax state. The tax numbers are just an estimate at this point (will file my tax return in the spring), but should be pretty close.

The federal government provides health care for cheap after you turn 65. Somehow this doesn’t get everybody mad about “socialized medicine,” which is a good thing I guess.
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Old 31st Dec 2019, 17:19
  #53 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,611
Originally Posted by FlightDetent View Post
For the US salaries, what would be the coefficient from GROSS to NET ? Once you retire over there, would the medical insurance cover still continue?
It will vary quite a bit from person to person. As you make more, the percentage increases. If you’re single, most narrowbody FO’s will be in the ~25% tax bracket. You pay less if you’re married, and even less if you have children.

Some (not all) states impose a state tax as well. Likewise, some cities like NYC will also tax its residents.

Other things you do (or don’t do) will change your tax liability.
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Old 31st Dec 2019, 22:16
  #54 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: EU
Posts: 615
Originally Posted by jriv View Post


my net will be around $217k on $335k gross. I live in California. The state of California got about 30% of those taxes paid and the federal government got the other 70%. California is a high-tax state. The tax numbers are just an estimate at this point (will file my tax return in the spring), but should be pretty close.

The federal government provides health care for cheap after you turn 65. Somehow this doesn’t get everybody mad about “socialized medicine,” which is a good thing I guess.
What is the pension like and how does it work?
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Old 31st Dec 2019, 22:24
  #55 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Gold Coast
Posts: 60
US airlines used to have “defined benefit” pension plans where the company promised to put money away for you and you’d get a certain amount of money each month until both you and your spouse died. That was taken away in bankruptcy court after 9/11.

Currently the major airlines are putting 15-16 cents for every dollar you make into a retirement fund that is owned by you. There are rules that apply to how you can use that money, but essentially you can’t touch it until age 65 unless you want to take a big penalty and pay a bunch of taxes on the disbursement.

So if my gross pay for a month is $10,000, the company deposits another $1,000 in my retirement fund (created by section 401(k) of the tax code, so commonly called a 401(k) account).

The deposits are pre-tax, the money is managed by either you or a professional investment company, and the money is taxed as you withdraw it in retirement.
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Old 31st Dec 2019, 22:46
  #56 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: EU
Posts: 615
Originally Posted by jriv View Post
US airlines used to have “defined benefit” pension plans where the company promised to put money away for you and you’d get a certain amount of money each month until both you and your spouse died. That was taken away in bankruptcy court after 9/11.

Currently the major airlines are putting 15-16 cents for every dollar you make into a retirement fund that is owned by you. There are rules that apply to how you can use that money, but essentially you can’t touch it until age 65 unless you want to take a big penalty and pay a bunch of taxes on the disbursement.

So if my gross pay for a month is $10,000, the company deposits another $1,000 in my retirement fund (created by section 401(k) of the tax code, so commonly called a 401(k) account).

The deposits are pre-tax, the money is managed by either you or a professional investment company, and the money is taxed as you withdraw it in retirement.
Thanks. Some quick calculations show that the amount in a uk pilot pension isn’t that different to you guys (assuming major uk and major us). But your salaries are frustratingly, significantly higher and I always wonder how that became the case. And how your companies still make big profits with such pay for the workforce.
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Old 31st Dec 2019, 23:02
  #57 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Gold Coast
Posts: 60
Originally Posted by pudoc View Post


Thanks. Some quick calculations show that the amount in a uk pilot pension isn’t that different to you guys (assuming major uk and major us). But your salaries are frustratingly, significantly higher and I always wonder how that became the case. And how your companies still make big profits with such pay for the workforce.
Good questions. I suppose it comes down to supply and demand, but it sure seemed like there were enough applicants for the majors before the current big union contracts.

The real pressure was at the lower rungs of the industry where people just weren’t willing to work for the peanuts that were being offered. Around 2013 retirements kicked back in after the 5-year lull due to the mandatory retirement age going from 60-65, and at the same time the 1500 hour rule also kicked in (even first officers need to now have at least 1500 hours). The regionals had to increase pay to attract and keep pilots. I guess those increasing wages pushed wages up further up the career ladder.
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Old 1st Jan 2020, 00:03
  #58 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,611
Originally Posted by jriv View Post
US airlines used to have “defined benefit” pension plans where the company promised to put money away for you and you’d get a certain amount of money each month until both you and your spouse died. That was taken away in bankruptcy court after 9/11.

Currently the major airlines are putting 15-16 cents for every dollar you make into a retirement fund that is owned by you. There are rules that apply to how you can use that money, but essentially you can’t touch it until age 65 unless you want to take a big penalty and pay a bunch of taxes on the disbursement.

So if my gross pay for a month is $10,000, the company deposits another $1,000 in my retirement fund (created by section 401(k) of the tax code, so commonly called a 401(k) account).

The deposits are pre-tax, the money is managed by either you or a professional investment company, and the money is taxed as you withdraw it in retirement.
This is pretty accurate, except after earning $10,000, the company would put $1,500 into the retirement fund. The only airlines I’m aware of that still have a pension plan are Fedex and UPS. They’re at the top of our compensation ladder.
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Old 1st Jan 2020, 00:09
  #59 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 1,611
Originally Posted by pudoc View Post
And how your companies still make big profits with such pay for the workforce.
It does make you stop and think when you hear a manager say “you guys are our largest expense”, doesn’t it?
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Old 1st Jan 2020, 05:19
  #60 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Gold Coast
Posts: 60
Originally Posted by Check Airman View Post


This is pretty accurate, except after earning $10,000, the company would put $1,500 into the retirement fund. The only airlines I’m aware of that still have a pension plan are Fedex and UPS. They’re at the top of our compensation ladder.
Oops! Right.
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