Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Flight Deck Forums > Tech Log
Reload this Page >

737NG Landing Gear Changes?

Tech Log The very best in practical technical discussion on the web

737NG Landing Gear Changes?

Old 8th Jun 2016, 16:47
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Wherever LNAV Goes...
Posts: 44
737NG Landing Gear Changes?

I've noticed that our new 737Ng's delivered over the last 6 months or so are much smoother to land than the older aircraft. It feels like the main gear oleos have a bit more give than before and there is definitely less of an impact when we land, even when I'm expecting a controlled crash

Does anyone know if changes have already incorporated in preparation for the MAX, just like the landing lights, start levers etc.
JT8D-17 is offline  
Old 8th Jun 2016, 20:24
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: In Space
Posts: 634
I would guess that there is more Nitrogen in the oleo, and possibly needs topping up on your older fleet.
B737900er is offline  
Old 8th Jun 2016, 20:39
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Glasgow
Age: 32
Posts: 87
Agreement with -900.

No change as for as I know.
Dougie_diesel is offline  
Old 8th Jun 2016, 22:08
  #4 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Wherever LNAV Goes...
Posts: 44
It's possible but when the older aircraft were brand new we didn't notice any difference, it's definitely only on the aircraft delivered in the last 6 months or so.
JT8D-17 is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2016, 09:27
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: last time I looked I was still here.
Posts: 4,510
This is a new one. Workmen usually blame their tools for screwing up, but here you are praising them rather than taking credit. Hm? There's nowt so queer as folk.
RAT 5 is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2016, 09:45
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: north of barlu
Posts: 6,175
B737900er

Low nitrogen pressure is likely to result in less resistance to movement and a softer ride ( untill you hit the stops ) as is low fluid quantity.

Both correct nitrogen pressure and fluid quantity are critical to maintaining tail skid clearance.
A and C is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2016, 10:01
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: EU
Posts: 1,218
I'd say you're either getting better or treating your new birds with more care! ;-)
Mikehotel152 is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2016, 13:28
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Nearer home than before!
Posts: 443
SFP? it's standard now isn't it (well free so everyone takes it as an option?)

Otherwise Dunno? Oleo is oil/Air (Nitrogen) so the air is the spring and the oil is both the damping and quantity determines rising rate to the spring. During line servicing, they can't really account for oil level as this is a shop thing, so will measure extension and pressurize accordingly.

Thus as the legs "age" (or get towards shop overhaul point) the oil level lowers. Thus at any given extension, the correct pressure "adjusted" by line crew will give less of a rising rate than a new leg. Thus it will sink in a bit softer and feel better. Most types I have flown show a tendency to land smoother as the legs get towards the end of their time... my last type must have been a 5,000hr limit, as anything just over a 5,000hr total landed like a brick..

Not noticed as much on a 737 except for the new ones are screwed together a bit tighter so rattle less on impact.
RVF750 is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2016, 15:27
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: last time I looked I was still here.
Posts: 4,510
Perhaps they have installed a water spray above the wheels to give you a little cushion on touchdown.
RAT 5 is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2016, 19:46
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Seattle, WA
Age: 52
Posts: 83
During line servicing, they can't really account for oil level as this is a shop thing, so will measure extension and pressurize accordingly.
It isn't a shop thing. A full strut fluid servicing or level check can easily be performed during a overnight RON. Heck, a full strut repack can be done on an overnight visit.

I checked the IPC for two 900ER's, one two weeks old, the other four years old. Both have the same strut assy. part numbers.
Yeelep is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2016, 20:02
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Betwixt and between
Posts: 666
No difference at all between new and old elements of our fleet.
Sciolistes is offline  
Old 9th Jun 2016, 20:18
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: north of barlu
Posts: 6,175
RVF750

There is a procedure that Boeing published for the B737-200 for line maintenance to check the PX/EX of the landing gear and then put a measured weight of fuel on the aircraft then re-check the PX/EX.

The result would tell you if the oil level in the leg was correct, I assume they publish the same sort of procedure for the -800.
A and C is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.