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S.L.O.P. /offset in Africa

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S.L.O.P. /offset in Africa

Old 12th Feb 2011, 14:16
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S.L.O.P. /offset in Africa

I fly in Africa quite abit. Several years ago I saw a form, I believe it was published by the IATA. It simply recommended that anytime you were in certain areas that required Inflight Broadcast procedures on 126.90 that you offset 1 mile right of course.
Does anybody know where I can find this recommendation in printed form?
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Old 12th Feb 2011, 14:34
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Nothing to do with IATA. The ICAO document may be found at the link below:

http://www.icao.int/wacaf/APIRG/2009.../Docs/WP13.pdf

Regards,

Tom
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Old 12th Feb 2011, 17:05
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The decision to apply a strategic lateral offset is the responsibility of the flight crew.
Note not required, only recommended if the flight crew thinks it's necessary.
We generally do not offset, except under exceptional circumstances.

Those exceptional circumstances...the Commander decides to do so.
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Old 12th Feb 2011, 17:13
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You can actually fly on track and do SLOP at the same time, at least in NAT, since you are recommended to fly 0,1,2 or 3 miles right of track. Most of the flights I choose to SLOP 0 miles.
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Old 12th Feb 2011, 18:11
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You can actually fly on track and do SLOP at the same time, at least in NAT, since you are recommended to fly 0,1,2 or 3 miles right of track. Most of the flights I choose to SLOP 0 miles.
You might want to brush up on the procedure. The "O" in SLOP is when you are flying 1nm or 2 nm right of the assigned track. The assigned track is and always has been the primary route. SLOP allows for two additional strategic procedures that do not normally require any additional clearance.

3nm is a new one on me?
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Old 12th Feb 2011, 19:23
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@ Bealzebub:
I stand corrected.
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Old 14th Feb 2011, 16:11
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I encourage you to SLOP if not prohibited

GPS seems to be more common today, and the accuracy this adds to navigation is incredible (.04nm after a North Atlantic crossing). An eye-opening event seems to occur about once every couple of years for me. Flying on a published airway or NAT track, another flight passes us from below. Both of us are GPS-equippped, and my radio altimeter comes alive (sometimes GPWS speaks up also). This demonstrates the accuracy of GPS, and this accuracy causes me to believe that whenever it is not prohibited, I will always SLOP when my jet has GPS.

With that in mind, I will always SLOP on the North Atlantic and WATRS airspace. I will SLOP in remote areas of South America where SLOP is not prohibited. Likewise for Africa (I have not been there), especially when in areas of IFBP (most of Africa I am told).

I encourage all of you who operate with GPS-equipped jets to adopt SLOP.
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Old 14th Feb 2011, 16:45
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None

Absolutely agree.

Old dinosaurs like 411Z need serious re-education. Thankfully they don't fly much
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Old 14th Feb 2011, 17:00
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Having been born, bred, and learned to fly in Africa, I can say without hesitation that SLOP in the IFBP area is a damn good idea! Regardless of what 411C says .....
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Old 14th Feb 2011, 17:34
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Here's another thumbs up for SLOP in oceanic and African (and other) airspace.



Lights on (at night, obviously) is also some cheap insurance.

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Old 14th Feb 2011, 20:28
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Having been born, bred, and learned to fly in Africa, I can say without hesitation that SLOP in the IFBP area is a damn good idea!
Suggest you so inform LH, then...as the last few LH flights I encountered on the airways had zero offset....and they fly to Africa many times a day.
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Old 14th Feb 2011, 23:18
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Nothing against SLOP on the ocean, but what is the point where there are crossing airways. Unless "SLOPing" vertically.
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Old 14th Feb 2011, 23:38
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My own operating procedure is to add a SLOP if I'm doing IFBPs. Especially in Africa and especially during the Haj! It's free, easy and improves the safety margin by a huge factor. No one has to do it, unless it's in their SOPs (I'm aware of at least one company who has included it). It's an airmanship call and personal preference.

And with everyone maintaining the airway centreline within their own wingspan thes days, it makes a lot of sense.
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Old 16th Feb 2011, 19:40
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Does that mighty L1011 have the ability to do an offset with the currently installed LRN?
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Old 16th Feb 2011, 20:11
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Nothing against SLOP on the ocean, but what is the point where there are crossing airways. Unless "SLOPing" vertically.
Well, there was a case of the BizJet and 737 over South America that proves the point.If either had flown an offset they would have passed in the night, never knowing how close they came.
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Old 17th Feb 2011, 10:22
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... and that incident has what to do with SLOP?
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Old 17th Feb 2011, 17:30
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Does that mighty L1011 have the ability to do an offset with the currently installed LRN?
Certainly does.
Even possible with the original Hamilton Sundstrand FMC units, circa 1977.
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Old 17th Feb 2011, 17:48
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IFBP, 2nm slop and lights on...

if LH choose not to thats upto them but for me its a must in africa!!
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Old 17th Feb 2011, 20:29
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Tommy Tilt and others,

Nothing to do with IATA.
To be pedantic, I think that we are talking about two different procedures here:

1. The IATA In-Flight Broadcast Procedure (IFBP), part of which recommends broadcasting position reports at ETA -10mins on 126.9 and flying 1nm right of track; and

2. The ICAO SLOP as applied to the AFI region which allows for 1nm or 2nm right and allows the use of 126.9 to co-ordinate offsets amongst flight crew.

The IATA IFBP was implemented as a temporary(!) measure several years ago, due to the poor co-ordination between neighbouring ATS providers.

The ICAO SLOP as described in the WP13.pdf is part of the implementation of RVSM and is designed to "enhance safety by reducing the risk of collision in case of loss of vertical separation".

I think that the paper (WP13) contained only the recommendations of a committee meeting which have not yet been officially adopted?

In any case, both procedures have the aim of increasing flight safety by reducing the risk of collision and I for one always implement the IATA IFBP, including the 1nm offset. I must admit that I wasn't aware of the ICAO SLOP within AFI, with its 1nm or 2nm option, until reading this thread. I do apply SLOP in NAT and WATRS airspace.

Live and learn!
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