Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Non-Airline Forums > Space Flight and Operations
Reload this Page >

SpaceX Falcon 9 Live Landing Attempt

Space Flight and Operations News and Issues Following Space Flight, Testing, Operations and Professional Development

SpaceX Falcon 9 Live Landing Attempt

Old 13th Jun 2021, 18:37
  #381 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
ORAC is offline  
Old 19th Jun 2021, 06:04
  #382 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
Another successful launch and booster recovery.

https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/06/1...ercial-rocket/


SpaceX launches first national security mission on reused commercial rocket

ORAC is offline  
Old 23rd Jun 2021, 19:30
  #383 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
Miss a week and you miss a launch….

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-tra...e-static-fire/

SpaceX rocket ready for second rideshare launch with 100+ small satellites

For the second time in six months, a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is ready to launch around 100+ small satellites into low orbit as part of a rideshare mission for dozens of companies and institutions.

Known as Transporter-2, the mission is SpaceX’s second dedicated launch under the Smallsat Rideshare Program it established in 2019. In 2020,

SpaceX began its first launches under the program and delivered eight Earth observation satellites to orbit for Planet and Blacksky as co-passengers on three Starlink missions. A fourth Starlink rideshare was later completed with payloads from Capella Space and Tyvak in May 2021.

In January 2021, Falcon 9 successfully launched 143 small satellites into orbit on a mission known as Transport-1, setting an all-time record for the number of spacecraft flown on a single rocket and emphasizing just how serious and competitive SpaceX’s Smallsat Program really is……

It remains to be seen what exactly Transporter-2 will be carrying to orbit. Transporter-1 carried 133 customer spacecraft and 10 of SpaceX’s own Starlink satellites with a collective liftoff mass of around five metric tons (~11,000 lb). The true mass is unknown but the Falcon 9 booster supporting the mission had to land on a drone ship ~550 km (~340 mi) downrange.

Transporter-2, however, will reportedly involve an increasingly rare return-to-launch-site (RTLS) landing for Falcon 9 booster B1060, implying that its payloads may be substantially lighter than its predecessor’s.


Based on a rough accounting of known Transporter-2 payloads from rideshare managers Spaceflight, Exolaunch, and others, the mission could feasibly launch with 100+ small satellites onboard.

Relative to Transporter-1, the most obvious weight-saving solution would be to exclude Starlink satellites, which likely represented more than a third of missions payload mass at liftoff.

Given that SpaceX also appears to be preparing for a flurry of dedicated polar Starlink launches from its West and East Coast pads that could begin as early as July, it’s fairly safe to assume that Transporter-2 will be Starlink-free.

Ultimately, Transporter-2 appears to be on track for a 2:56 pm EDT (18:56 UTC) launch on Friday, June 25th.

ORAC is offline  
Old 26th Jun 2021, 10:52
  #384 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
SpaceX is targeting no earlier than next week for its upcoming Falcon 9 launch from Florida, a rare polar mission that will see the rocket pivot south and hug the state's east coast.

The company on Friday confirmed teams were targeting no earlier than 2:56 p.m. Tuesday, June 29, for the 230-foot rocket's flight from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

The mission named Transporter-2 was originally slated to fly from Launch Complex 40 on Friday, June 25.
ORAC is offline  
Old 30th Jun 2021, 15:05
  #385 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Somewhere flat
Posts: 135
SpaceX is targeting Wednesday, June 30 for launch of Transporter-2, SpaceX’s second dedicated SmallSat Rideshare Program mission, from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. The 58-minute launch window opens at 2:56 p.m. EDT, or 18:56 UTC. This mission also marks SpaceX’s second launch to a polar orbit from Florida. On its way to space, Falcon 9 will fly on a southern trajectory along Florida’s eastern coast over the Atlantic ocean and may be visible from the ground.
https://www.spacex.com/launches/
goofer3 is offline  
Old 30th Jun 2021, 22:05
  #386 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: UK
Age: 56
Posts: 3,206

Nailed it again. Great views of the re entry and descent.
TURIN is offline  
Old 6th Jul 2021, 19:15
  #387 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-elo...se-goals-2021/

SpaceX sets new goals for Falcon booster reuse goals after ten-flight milestone

Speaking virtually at Barcelona’s 2021 Mobile World Congress (MWC), CEO Elon Musk says that SpaceX has already set its sights on even more ambitious reusability goals for Falcon rocket boosters.

Less than two months prior, booster B1051 sent 60 satellites and an upper stage on their way to orbit, simultaneously becoming the first Falcon 9 first stage to ace ten orbital-class launches and landings, crossing a mostly symbolic – but still significant – milestone years in the making.

SpaceX competitors – most notably the United Launch Alliance – have often held the ten-flight mark over its head as the latest in a long line of moving goalposts used to discredit, demean, and look down upon reusable rockets and SpaceX’s efforts to realize them.

Not long before it was clear that SpaceX would hit that 10-flight target with at least one Falcon booster, competitors working overtime to rationalize a lack of substantial investment into reusable rockets shifted their goalposts again, expanding rationales to require a fleetwide average of ten flights.

Instead of explaining why SpaceX’s reusability plans could never work, as many dozens of aerospace executives have assuredly done over the last 5-10 years, the new attitude du jour is to claim that SpaceX’s ability to achieve its reuse goals was never actually in doubt and that the economics of full booster reuse simply can’t make economic sense!

Now, five and half years after Falcon 9’s first successful booster landing, four years after SpaceX’s first successful booster reuse, and seven weeks after a Falcon 9 first stage’s first ten-flight milestone, Elon Musk says that some of the company’s fleet of boosters are already “slated to fly 20 or possibly 30 times.”

Never one to personally rest or allow his companies to rest on their laurels, SpaceX now has a new target to strive for as teams work to ramp and sustain Falcon 9’s launch cadence at
record-breaking levels……

Back in Musk’s 2018 conference call, he also noted that beyond plans for up to ten flights without refurbishment, Falcon boosters could feasibly be made to fly dozens or even 100+ times with occasional in-depth maintenance – not unlike modern aircraft.

Three years later, Musk is now talking about launching certain Falcon boosters 20 or 30 times, while something approximating the recurring maintenance he once described has yet to crop up.

It’s possible, in other words, that SpaceX has found that Falcon 9 Block 5 boosters – which do need some small amount of refurbishment and inspection after each launch – can actually be flown 20 or 30 times without major rework.

Ultimately, only time will tell, but Falcon 9 B1051’s 11th flight is expected – this time from the West Coast – as early as late July or August 2021, carrying SpaceX’s first or second dedicated batch of polar Starlink satellites.

B1051 arrived at Vandenberg Air/Space Force Base (VAFB) in late June about a month after Falcon 9 B1049 – likely set to become the second booster to complete ten launches…….
ORAC is offline  
Old 10th Jul 2021, 16:49
  #388 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/07/1...ulf-of-mexico/

SpaceX cargo capsule splashes down in Gulf of Mexico

Wrapping up a 36-day mission to the International Space Station, a SpaceX Cargo Dragon capsule splashed down in the Gulf of Mexico Friday night with biomedical experiments, spacewalk equipment, and other hardware returning from orbit.

The unpiloted spacecraft made a parachute-assisted splashdown in the Gulf of Mexico south of Tallahassee, Florida, at 11:29 p.m. EDT Friday (0329 GMT Saturday).

SpaceX confirmed the capsule’s splashdown in a tweet as recovery teams converged on the Dragon spacecraft in the Gulf of Mexico. SpaceX’s “Go Navigator” recovery ship was on station near the splashdown zone to pull the capsule out of the sea.

Once the Dragon capsule is on the deck of the recovery ship, teams will open the hatch and retrieve time-sensitive research specimens for delivery by helicopter to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where scientists will begin analyzing the experiments.

The recovery ship will bring the capsule back to Cape Canaveral for refurbishment and reuse on a future cargo mission......

This mission was SpaceX’s second resupply flight to use the company’s upgraded Cargo Dragon spacecraft, which is based on the design of the human-rated crew Dragon spaceship.

The new version of the Dragon spacecraft is designed to be flown at least five times, up from three missions on the earlier configuration......
ORAC is offline  
Old 26th Jul 2021, 09:12
  #389 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
And, of course, the same technology which will provide coverage of the Starship flight to Hawaii - but with the Starlink terminals on the Syarship, not a drone ship….

ORAC is offline  
Old 28th Jul 2021, 20:18
  #390 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
https://spaceflightnow.com/2021/07/2...es-next-month/

SpaceX to begin launching the next series of Starlink satellites

After going through the month of July with no launches, SpaceX is scheduled to resume missions in August with Falcon 9 rocket flights from California and Florida to begin deploying Starlink internet satellites into new orbits.

SpaceX is gearing up for at least two Starlink launches next month, beginning with a Falcon 9 mission departing from Vandenberg Space Force Base, California, no earlier than Aug. 10, multiple sources said. Another Falcon 9 launch is scheduled to carry a batch of Starlink satellites into orbit in mid-August…..

SpaceX has launched 1,740 Starlink satellites to date, including prototypes already retired, more than all other commercial satellite fleets combined. Most of the satellites have launched into a 53-degree inclination orbit, the first of five orbital “shells” the company plans to complete full deployment of the Starlink network.…

SpaceX’s other Starlink layers will include 1,584 satellites at 335 miles (540 kilometers) and an inclination of 53.2 degrees, 720 satellites at 354 miles (570 kilometers) and an inclination of 70 degrees, and 520 satellites spread into two shells at 348 miles (560 kilometers) and an inclination of 97.6 degrees.

The Starlink mission set for liftoff from Vandenberg next month, designated “Starlink 2-1,” will begin populating a new orbital shell.…

A SpaceX application with the FCC associated with launch vehicle telemetry links for the Starlink launch from Vandenberg suggests the company’s booster landing platform, or drone ship, will be positioned in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California. The drone ship position indicates the launch will target an orbit with an inclination of 70 degrees.

A similar FCC application for a Starlink launch next month from Cape Canaveral shows a SpaceX drone ship will be parked in the Atlantic Ocean in line with a rocket trajectory heading for an inclination of 53.2 degrees…..

More Starlink missions will follow the launches in mid-August. SpaceX is expected to launch an average of one Starlink mission per month from Vandenberg over the next year, and there will be a regular cadence of Starlink flights from Cape Canaveral, too.….

SpaceX launched 10 Starlink satellites into a 97.6-degree polar orbit on a rideshare mission in January. Another three Starlink payloads launched into a similar orbit last month on a subsequent rideshare flight.

Those satellites featured [email protected] intersatellite links, which allow spacecraft to pass data and internet traffic between each other without routing it through a ground station. The upgrade will allow SpaceX to provide internet connectivity near the poles and in other regions without ground stations…..

SpaceX has not disclosed what, if any, design changes it plans to introduce on the next series of Starlink satellites, which the company builds on an assembly line at a development facility in Redmond, Washington.….
ORAC is offline  
Old 18th Aug 2021, 11:56
  #391 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-fal...th-launch-gap/

SpaceX set to end longest gap between Falcon launches in two years

NASA has confirmed that SpaceX’s next Falcon 9 launch is now scheduled to occur no earlier than 3:37 am EDT (07:37 UTC) on Saturday, August 28th.

Known as CRS-23, the cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS) is noteworthy for two major reasons. Most importantly, CRS-23 will mark SpaceX’s first-ever reuse of an upgraded Cargo Dragon 2 spacecraft. Simultaneously, that reuse milestone will coincide with another when SpaceX smashes its internal record for orbital spacecraft turnaround later this month.

Second, much to the surprise of virtually everyone watching from the sidelines, SpaceX’s last launch occurred on June 30th – in the first half of 2021. One step removed from the mission’s technical specifics, CRS-23 will, in other words, also be SpaceX’s first launch in almost two months – a gap not seen in two years…..
ORAC is offline  
Old 29th Aug 2021, 10:18
  #392 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: UK
Age: 56
Posts: 3,206
Finally gets up after a couple of weather aborts.

TURIN is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2021, 09:30
  #393 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
Two Dragons at the ISS ,for the first time.

https://www.space.com/spacex-dragon-...station-crs-23

SpaceX's Dragon cargo ship docks at space station
ORAC is offline  
Old 31st Aug 2021, 14:19
  #394 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Poplar Grove, IL, USA
Posts: 884
Originally Posted by ORAC View Post
Two Dragons at the ISS ,for the first time.
Not counting the other first time, of course:
https://www.cnbc.com/2020/12/07/spac...irst-time.html

It is surprising how little real-time interest this generated in the forum. I suppose it is getting routine. Or maybe everybody is too amazed at the latest Blue Origin mission to notice a small thing like sending cargo to the ISS.
IFMU is offline  
Old 1st Sep 2021, 00:51
  #395 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: UK
Age: 56
Posts: 3,206
What Blue Origin mission?
TURIN is offline  
Old 1st Sep 2021, 13:09
  #396 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Poplar Grove, IL, USA
Posts: 884
Originally Posted by TURIN View Post
What Blue Origin mission?
Exactly! I found it painful to watch.
IFMU is offline  
Old 14th Sep 2021, 15:55
  #397 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
https://spacenews.com/spacex-launche...rlink-mission/

SpaceX launches first dedicated polar Starlink mission

WASHINGTON — SpaceX launched its first dedicated polar Starlink mission Sept. 13 as the company moves into the next phase of deployment of its broadband satellite constellation.

A Falcon 9 lifted off from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California at 11:55 p.m. Eastern. The rocket’s payload of 51 Starlink satellites deployed 15 and a half minutes after launch, although it took an additional 11 minutes to confirm the satellites separated as expected.

The rocket’s first stage, making its tenth flight, landed on a droneship in the Pacific Ocean nearly nine minutes after liftoff. The booster, the second to have reached the ten-flight milestone, had previously launched seven other Starlink missions as well as the Telstar 18 Vantage and Iridium-8 missions.

The launch was the first dedicated Starlink launch since May 26, although three Starlink satellites were included on the Transporter-2 rideshare mission that launched June 30. The launch was also the first dedicated launch of Starlink satellites to polar orbit.

SpaceX blamed the long gap in Starlink launches on delays in completing a new series of satellites that include [email protected] inter-satellite links. Those links will minimize the number of ground stations the network needs to provide service in the polar regions and over the oceans…..

ORAC is offline  
Old 1st Oct 2021, 08:06
  #398 (permalink)  
Ecce Homo! Loquitur...
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Peripatetic
Posts: 12,163
ORAC is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.