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SpaceX Falcon 9 Live Landing Attempt

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SpaceX Falcon 9 Live Landing Attempt

Old 4th Mar 2021, 16:50
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https://spacenews.com/engine-shutdow...oster-landing/

Engine shutdown led to failed Falcon 9 booster landing

WASHINGTON — A Falcon 9 first stage failed to land after a launch last month because one of its engines shut down during flight after hot gas breached a worn-out cover.

During a NASA press conference March 1 about the upcoming Crew-2 commercial crew flight, Benji Reed, senior director for human spaceflight programs at SpaceX, said that while the booster used on that Feb. 15 launch was making its sixth flight, some components on it were “life leaders” that had flown more often than any other in the Falcon 9 fleet.

That included “boots,” or covers around parts of the Merlin engines in the first stage. “This was the highest count number of flights that this particular boot design had seen,” he said.

However, one of those boots had a “little bit of a hole” that allowed hot gas to get into parts of the engine during flight, he said. “A little bit of hot gas got to where it’s not supposed to be, and it caused that engine to shut down,” he said.

Reed didn’t mention at what point in the launch the engine shut down, but he suggested it took place during ascent. “A great thing about Falcon 9 is that we have engine-out capability,” he said, meaning that one of the first stage’s nine engines can shut down without jeopardizing the mission. “The vehicle got to orbit and put the satellites exactly where they want to be. The primary mission was accomplished.”

The shutdown of the engine, though, kept the first stage from landing. “When that booster came to return home, because of the problem with that particular engine, we didn’t have enough thrust to get back to where we needed to be, and didn’t land where we wanted to be,” he said......
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Old 4th Mar 2021, 16:59
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https://www.space.com/spacex-starlin...ss-8th-landing

SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches and lands for 8th time, delivering 60 Starlink satellites to orbit


CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched a new batch of 60 Starlink internet satellites into orbit Thursday morning (March 4), and nailed its landing on a floating platform at sea to top off the long-awaited mission.....

A two-stage Falcon 9 booster, topped with the 60 broadband spacecraft, lifted off from Pad 39A here at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 3:24 a.m. EST (0824 GMT). Approximately nine minutes later, the reusable rocket's first stage returned to Earth to attempt its eighth landing on SpaceX's drone ship "Of Course I Still Love You" about 400 miles (630 kilometers) downrange, out in the Atlantic Ocean.

"And we have confirmation of our successful stage one landing," Youmei Zhou, a Dragon propulsion engineer at SpaceX, said during a live webcast of the launch. "This will mark our 75th successful recovery of an orbital class rocket and the eighth recovery of this particular booster."...

This latest mission marked the company's 20th Starlink mission and it's sixth mission overall for 2021 for SpaceX....





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Old 9th Mar 2021, 15:18
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The Octagrabber.....

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2021...y-octagrabber/

SpaceX evolving fairing recovery plans, taking advantage of Octagrabber in pursuit of rapid reusability

.....On several missions, the “Octagrabber” system on board both drone ships has made the difference between a successful recovery and losing a booster at sea.

On the morning of November 19, 2020, SpaceX’s Falcon 9 core B1061 returned to Port Canaveral aboard the deck of drone ship Just Read the Instructions. Just days before, B1061 and its second stage blasted the company’s first operational crewed mission, Crew-1, to orbit.

As B1061 appeared over the horizon, it was immediately noticeable that something was wrong. As the drone ship neared port, it became apparent that the booster was secure on the deck but leaning almost 10 degrees.

Around one month later, core B1051, which had just supported the SXM-7 mission, arrived in port with a similarly dire lean. This time, the lean was so bad that one of the booster’s four landing legs was not even resting on the drone ship’s deck.

Often battered by high seas, howling winds, and raging storms, the drone ships and their recovery crews face a difficult task during the several day journey to and from recovery zones at sea. Landed boosters are kept secure thanks to a massive white robot dubbed “Octagrabber.”....

When not needed to secure a booster, Octagrabber rests safely in its garage, hidden behind the drone ship’s blast wall.....


After a landing, Octagrabber rolls on its two massive treads from its garage and stops directly underneath the booster. Four arms then connect to Falcon 9’s base, called the octaweb. These arms connect to the same hold-down points used to secure the rocket to its launch pad before liftoff.

While Octagrabber is quite small compared to a Falcon 9 booster, it still provides a strong enough grip that prevents the booster from sliding or falling off the deck because a Falcon 9 is quite light after landing; now empty of fuel, most of the booster’s mass is at the bottom where the nine Merlin engines are located.

Octagrabber itself is very large and flat, providing a stable base for the rocket to be secured to versus resting solely on its landing legs.......
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Old 11th Mar 2021, 22:18
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Another success today. The 6th time this booster has landed.


Last edited by TURIN; 11th Mar 2021 at 22:54.
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Old 13th Mar 2021, 21:36
  #365 (permalink)  
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Definitely getting their monies worth out of it.....

https://www.space.com/spacex-starlin...launch-webcast

SpaceX to attempt record 9th flight of a Falcon 9 rocket with Starlink launch on Sunday

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — SpaceX is gearing up to launch a third batch of Starlink satellites in as many weeks on Sunday (March 14) and you can watch the action live online.

The Hawthorne, California-based company is planning to fly one of its veteran Falcon 9 rockets for a record nine times with the mission, which comes just days after SpaceX's last launch. The two-stage launcher will blast off from the historic Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center here in Florida at 6:01 a.m. EDT (1101 GMT). .....

The booster, B1051, is one of two fleet leaders in SpaceX's stable of reusable rockets. It first flew in March of 2019, lofting an uncrewed Crew Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of a demonstration mission.

Following that successful debut, B1051 trekked across the country to launch a trio of Earth-observing satellites for Canada from SpaceX's facilities at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. The booster then flew a total of five times from Florida in 2020, carrying five different Starlink missions and a broadband satellite for Sirius XM.

Sunday's mission marks the second flight for B1051 this year, and its second Starlink mission so far in 2021.

After its last flight took off on Jan. 20, SpaceX engineers were able to turn around the booster and get it ready for its historic ninth flight in just 53 days — the second quickest turnaround time for this particular booster. (The fastest was between flights 7 and 8, which took off just 38 days apart.)......

This particular flight, Starlink 21, is the 22nd set of internet-beaming satellites that SpaceX has delivered to space, including a set of initial prototypes in 2019.

The company planned for its initial constellation to be 1,440 strong, and while SpaceX is well on its way to achieving that milestone, the company has already been granted approval for as many as 30,000 with the option for evenmore at a later time.

The latest stack of 60 satellites will join the fleet already in orbit, bringing the total number launched over 1,300.......
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Old 24th Mar 2021, 15:33
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https://www.space.com/spacex-starlin...anding-success

SpaceX launches 60 new Starlink internet satellites, nails latest rocket landing at sea

There are now more than 1,300 Starlink satellites in orbit.
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Old 27th Mar 2021, 07:48
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Listening to the commentators on the NASA site whilst waiting for the, scrubbed, SN11 launch, they discussed plans for future Starlink launches.

Spacex has now launched 1300 satellites out if a planned 1500, at their current launch rate that should be finished in 6-8 weeks (which is mind blowing in itself).

At which point they will reportedly switch to regular polar launches out of Vandenberg - which should provide good views in the higher latitudes.

The first 10 were launched on 24th January Transporter-1 mission which launched 133 satellites for various customers. The 10 were launched to an altitude of approximately 500-kilometers above Earth to operate in Sun-Synchronous Orbit (SSO).

The polar satellites transfer data between them using [email protected] so no ground stations are needed in the polar regions.


https://spacenews.com/spacex-adds-la...nk-satellites/

https://www.theverge.com/2021/3/26/2...rctic-military

OneWeb and SpaceX are racing to beam internet to the Arctic

Last edited by ORAC; 27th Mar 2021 at 08:07.
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Old 7th Apr 2021, 21:56
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Another successful launch and recovery of the stage 1 Falcon 9.
Some good images of the landing on this one.

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Old 12th Apr 2021, 20:23
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Rocket Report: SpaceX abandons catching fairings

Over the last couple of years, SpaceX has experimented with two ships with large nets, Ms. Chief and Ms. Tree, to catch Falcon 9 payload fairings returning from space beneath a parafoil. However, as the SpaceXfleet.com website notes, these efforts have not proven to be as reliable as SpaceX engineers likely imagined. "Catching" also proved dangerous to the recovery ships themselves.

As a result, SpaceX has transitioned to "wet recovery" of the fairings, in which the Dragon recovery ships
GO Searcher and GO Navigator quickly pluck the two halves from the ocean after splashdown. But those vehicles are increasingly needed for Dragon missions, so as a result the SpaceX fleet is changing.

Both
Ms. Chief and Ms. Tree have undergone a decommissioning process, and SpaceX has charted a much larger ship, the Shelia Bordelon, to begin pulling fairing halves from the ocean with its 50-ton crane. This, too, seems to be something of a stopgap measure.
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