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No Airbus for Ryanair

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No Airbus for Ryanair

Old 13th May 2020, 18:06
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No Airbus for Ryanair

But on Tuesday, O’Leary said he currently viewed talking with Airbus as a waste of his time.

“We would not initiate talks with Airbus until such time as Airbus wants to initiate talks with us,” he said in an interview.

“Until they need an order from the Ryanair Group, frankly we are wasting our time talking to Airbus,” he added, without elaborating.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-h...-idUSKBN22O1IZ
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Old 13th May 2020, 18:41
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One up for the Boeing negotiator...
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Old 13th May 2020, 18:57
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Can't wait to see how many 737 MAX 10's they're getting.
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Old 13th May 2020, 19:49
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And I thought it had been something personal between JL and MOL.
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Old 13th May 2020, 23:22
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Ryanair take most of the MAXs at a give away price for a complete fleet replacement with brand new aircraft. They operate them for 10 years and then get a big discount on Boeing’s B737 replacement when it becomes available.

Ryanair get a new fuel efficient fleet which will require little maintenance and have high dispatch reliability.

Boeing get rid of the backlog of aircraft taking up the employees car park, get some cash flow and retain a major customer whose vote of confidence in the aircraft will encourage others to buy it.

A win for both sides.
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Old 13th May 2020, 23:47
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Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
Ryanair take most of the MAXs at a give away price for a complete fleet replacement with brand new aircraft. They operate them for 10 years and then get a big discount on Boeing’s B737 replacement when it becomes available.
Ryanair get a new fuel efficient fleet which will require little maintenance and have high dispatch reliability.
Boeing get rid of the backlog of aircraft taking up the employees car park, get some cash flow and retain a major customer whose vote of confidence in the aircraft will encourage others to buy it.
A win for both sides.
Are there not 3 different versions of the Max (8, 9 and the Ryanair 10) with different cabin lengths and differences in the undercarriage, painted in different colours and with different seat configurations, seat types, loo placements and air stairs. A bit of a job making them all into Ryanair planes. And with the addition of the NG Ryanair would operate planes with 4 different seat capacities messing up their all planes can fly all routes and all loads because they are all the same and we only assign tail numbers the night before strategy.
There are other airlines commited to Boeing that will still need new planes in a couple of years. Planes don't stop ageing just because they don't fly, rather the opposite. And what would Boeing make in the meantime until they can come up with a new bread and butter plane. They can't live on the very low number of widebodies there is a market for. And after a couple of years all the skilled furloughed staff will have found other jobs, or retired, and the factories gone into disarray.
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Old 14th May 2020, 00:27
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Compared to getting the MAX back into the air, changing seats and repainting are minor details. Having differing seating capacities isn’t insurmountable, especially if the lower capacity aircraft are based at a major hub and assigned to appropriate flights, other airlines cope.

Depending on the price, anti dumping laws might be a problem if the aircraft are sold below production cost, which may happen as Boeing might have to aim to minimise their losses instead of making a profit.
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Old 14th May 2020, 05:18
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Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
Ryanair take most of the MAXs at a give away price for a complete fleet replacement with brand new aircraft. They operate them for 10 years and then get a big discount on Boeing’s B737 replacement when it becomes available.

Ryanair get a new fuel efficient fleet which will require little maintenance and have high dispatch reliability.

Boeing get rid of the backlog of aircraft taking up the employees car park, get some cash flow and retain a major customer whose vote of confidence in the aircraft will encourage others to buy it.

A win for both sides.
Except many punters aren't going to want to be passengers on the Max, bit like the 70's and the DC-10
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Old 14th May 2020, 05:47
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Originally Posted by Anti Skid On View Post
Except many punters aren't going to want to be passengers on the Max, bit like the 70's and the DC-10
Except by the time the Max is flying again, it could well be ticketed as the 737-8 or 737-9. LCC customers mainly look at prices before aircraft type.
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Old 14th May 2020, 05:47
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Originally Posted by Anti Skid On View Post
Except many punters aren't going to want to be passengers on the Max, bit like the 70's and the DC-10
I disagree. Most people will just look up the cheapest flight option without paying attention to those details.
If they would Ryanair wouldn’t be so successful to begin with
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Old 14th May 2020, 05:48
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Whilst being interviewed in the queue waiting to board a Ryanair flight to Alicante, Tracy 19 a shop assistant from Croydon stated that she had been following the news regarding the return to service of the MAX very carefully and was satisfied that Boeing had addressed all the issues put forward by the FAA and EASA. She felt that the additional training required for pilots transitioning onto the MAX from previous generations of the B737 was adequate, and modifications made to the flight control system and software would prevent a trim runaway. She described her main interests as fashion, boy bands, having her hair done and certification requirements for passenger aircraft.

She was looking forward to going out and getting legless with her mates that night and praised Ryanair for their cheap tickets.
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Old 14th May 2020, 05:48
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Except many punters aren't going to want to be passengers on the Max, bit like the 70's and the DC-10
Noone will ever know. They will retrofit the new winglets on every NG so over time noone can tell the difference.
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Old 14th May 2020, 06:13
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Bravo

Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
She described her main interests as fashion, boy bands, having her hair done and certification requirements for passenger aircraft.
You made me chuckle.

BV
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Old 14th May 2020, 11:55
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Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
Having differing seating capacities isn’t insurmountable, especially if the lower capacity aircraft are based at a major hub and assigned to appropriate flights, other airlines cope.
Other airlines may cope, but at a price. It is part of what gives Ryanair the cost advantage to not only be a Low Fares airline but a Low Cost airline.
Let things slide with a bit extra work for sales, a bit more work for ops, a few more parts in stores, a few more types of pilots and you are on the slippery slope.
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Old 14th May 2020, 12:19
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Ryanair is long past having exhausted any creditability with Airbus. They grew tired of offering very competitive terms and conditions, only to find MoL using that to put pressure on Boeing; there was never any intention of ordering from Airbus.

Thus, whenever Ryanair submits a RFQ to Airbus, they reply by sending the list price with little to no discounts and a clear message of "take it or leave it".

Airbus have no intention of wasting their time on Ryanair.

That Ryanair are spinning to make it sound as if it's a decision they've taken is hardly a surprise. What they will find, however, is that Boeing are also tuned in to the realities of their relationship with Airbus, and are therefore less inclined to find their sharpest pencil. Reap what you sow, in other words.

If and when the Max hits an unsurmountable roadblock, preventing RTS, Ryanair will find that they've dug themselves into the deepest of holes when it comes to fleet renewal. But, of course, there's always China and the C919; good luck with that!
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Old 14th May 2020, 12:53
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Originally Posted by Anti Skid On View Post
Except many punters aren't going to want to be passengers on the Max, bit like the 70's and the DC-10

The average passenger couldnt tell a Dash 8 to a Boeing 747. Most people, don't care about airplanes, merely a means from A to B.
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Old 14th May 2020, 13:18
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Originally Posted by Saulman View Post
The average passenger couldnt tell a Dash 8 to a Boeing 747. Most people, don't care about airplanes, merely a means from A to B.
….not to mention that nowhere in the reservations system will it specify that you are travelling on a Max, it will say 737-800 and only someone with aviation knowledge will know.

My guess is the Max word will never appear on the aircraft or in any literature BUT those who know will talk.

IG

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Old 14th May 2020, 13:21
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MOL will no doubt, be watching the A320 at Lauda to gauge a comparison (albeit as RYR will measure it) of its operational and through life costs to the 737-800. How Id love to see that analysis.
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Old 14th May 2020, 14:42
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Except by the time the Max is flying again, it could well be ticketed as the 737-8 or 737-9. LCC customers mainly look at prices before aircraft type
Thought the current 737-800 series - Ryanair's current star - was already labelled as 737-8 on aircraft type websites ...
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Old 14th May 2020, 14:51
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If they do not offer you travel insurance, it is probably a Max.
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