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Passenger offloaded from Air NZ flight for ignoring safety briefing

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Passenger offloaded from Air NZ flight for ignoring safety briefing

Old 8th May 2019, 09:36
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Passenger offloaded from Air NZ flight for ignoring safety briefing

This ...

www.theguardian.com/world/2019/may/08/passenger-thrown-off-air-new-zealand-plane-for-refusing-to-read-safety-instructions-card

A woman who refused to watch the regulation air safety video or read the safety instructions card handed to her by flight attendants has reportedly been removed from an Air New Zealand flight in Wellington.

The woman, described by other passengers as “wealthy-looking”, was sitting in the exit row but ignored attendants’ attempts to get her to listen to the safety instructions for flight NZ424 to Auckland on Tuesday.
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Old 8th May 2019, 09:44
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Apart from obviously being obnoxiously rude, they were sitting in an exit row so its bye-bye for them.
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Old 8th May 2019, 11:56
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Yes lady, the law applies to you. Did the man have to get off as well?

Perhaps she can pawn her bag and charter a private flight.

(One of the regular items taken into that TV program's pawn shop are bags that cost a bazillion quid. Utterly vacuous people in my not so humble opinion.)
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Old 8th May 2019, 13:47
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Airlines should actually position a cabin crew member in the exit row next to the emergency escape window/hatch.

But, aviation regulators let airlines get away with it by placing someone with half a brain to listen to what needs to be done in an emergency.

And stupidly, airlines then charge a premium to sell such seats to pax which tends to attract many of those "I am entitled" crowd that even don't have half a brain.
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Old 8th May 2019, 14:15
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As a frequent pax, I wish that more airlines would behave in a way that supports safety.

Instead we get overlong videos (I'm looking at you, BA) that seem to be designed to entertain and chug and crew who stand by placidly as people overtalk the briefings.

The best airline that I fly, in this respect, is Ryanair. Very short and to the point briefing and crew often prepared to ask pax to be quiet.
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Old 8th May 2019, 14:24
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The URL:
https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...tructions-card

The passenger has probably heard airline safety instructions dozens of time before. Is there that much difference between them? Frankly it surprised me that the crew made a big deal about this situation.
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Old 8th May 2019, 14:32
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Airlines should actually position a cabin crew member in the exit row next to the emergency escape window/hatch.
Why. would you care to explain why? Why shouldn't this passenger simply do what is required when she accepts an exit row.
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Old 8th May 2019, 14:33
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Whatever happened to the 21 year olds wearing suspenders and mini skirts who made flying fun?
We have to listen to this blah blah blah in case the drivers get it badly wrong and then we are supposed to fight our way out over mountains of baggage which should be in the hold.
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Old 8th May 2019, 14:34
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The passenger has probably heard airline safety instructions dozens of time before. Is there that much difference between them? Frankly it surprised me that the crew made a big deal about this situation.
I fly on average 50-80 times per year. Many of my flights are on the same type. However, I always give the cabin crew my full attention. Furthermore, if I am in the emergency exit row I always familiarize myself with the opening procedure so that I am mentally prepared. Same when not in an emergency exit row. I check my surroundings and count the rows to the nearest emergency exits in the event I have to navigate there in total darkness. How many people staying in hotels familiarize themselves with the quickest route and location to the emergency exits?

Sorry PastTense, there is NO excuse whatsover for the attitude of these passengers. I hope Air NZ will ban them for life!
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Old 8th May 2019, 14:40
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Originally Posted by PastTense
The passenger has probably heard airline safety instructions dozens of time before. Is there that much difference between them?
The point of rebriefing something is to ensure that you actually do remember it. The fact that you heard it once, years ago, does NOT mean that you will actually recall it now.

Or are you suggesting that doing a takeoff brief once a year should be sufficient for pilots, because "it doesn't change that much"? /sarcasm

(I don't fly anything like as much as HT, but I still do what they describe)
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Old 8th May 2019, 14:52
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In the US, exit row passengers are asked if they can help during an evacuation. If the passenger is unable or unwilling to help, they are simply moved to another seat. Just wondering why that wasn't done here?
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Old 8th May 2019, 15:13
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Half the passengers don't listen to safety briefings in the first place, of those that do half don't understand them. Of those that understand them, half won't remember them. That generally leaves a small number of people who would probably be able to work it out on their own anyway.
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Old 8th May 2019, 15:27
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Originally Posted by Final 3 Greens
As a frequent pax, I wish that more airlines would behave in a way that supports safety.

Instead we get overlong videos (I'm looking at you, BA) that seem to be designed to entertain and chug and crew who stand by placidly as people overtalk the briefings.

The best airline that I fly, in this respect, is Ryanair. Very short and to the point briefing and crew often prepared to ask pax to be quiet.
They're not overly long if they're entertaining. I found BA's recent star-studded safety video (the one hosted by Chabuddy G) quite good actually.

The videos are made like that in order to get passengers to watch them - you want the instructions to be followed or not?
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Old 8th May 2019, 15:31
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Originally Posted by Final 3 Greens
- - - crew often prepared to ask pax to be quiet.
Jet2 CC also. Full marks.
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Old 8th May 2019, 15:40
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Originally Posted by AndoniP
They're not overly long if they're entertaining. I found BA's recent star-studded safety video (the one hosted by Chabuddy G) quite good actually.

The videos are made like that in order to get passengers to watch them - you want the instructions to be followed or not?
But you're assuming that people watch them for the message; basic observation and listening skills will inform that people are watching the celebs, not the briefing. High attention, but potentially low recall when it is most needed.

You might like the Chabuddy G video, it's your perrogative, but having watched the original and the newer version well into three figures, it grates and feels like 60 minutes, not 6. Ryanair get the message across in about 90 seconds with an audio only track.

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Old 8th May 2019, 15:41
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Originally Posted by sixchannel
Jet2 CC also. Full marks.
Good to hear.
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Old 8th May 2019, 15:59
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Originally Posted by AndoniP
They're not overly long if they're entertaining. I found BA's recent star-studded safety video (the one hosted by Chabuddy G) quite good actually.

The videos are made like that in order to get passengers to watch them - you want the instructions to be followed or not?
I agree it was amusing the first few times. But if you are a frequent flier, it is far too long due to all the humour added. A safety briefing should be as short and as brief, covering only the essentials. Otherwise the important stuff is diluted.

As for the NZ couple. They ignored a flight crew instruction, which is illegal. Bye bye...
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Old 8th May 2019, 16:08
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Originally Posted by Glassos
In the US, exit row passengers are asked if they can help during an evacuation. If the passenger is unable or unwilling to help, they are simply moved to another seat. Just wondering why that wasn't done here?
Because the woman put her fingers in her ears!

That's the level of maturity the poor cabin crew have to deal with.
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Old 8th May 2019, 16:22
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In the early 80's, I was flying frequently as a then ex-RAF bod in U.K. defence industry , married to a retired B.A (707/Concorde) stewardess, We often discussed cabin evacuation and "other" cabin situations.. I wrote to B.A. suggesting a scheme whereas fit and able guys in similar positions to me could be put through the relevant cabin crew training ,paid for by industry . This initiative was triggered by a situation on a BA TriStar coming back from India where the cabin crew had asked for my assistance. I had been seated by an emergency exit incidentally and not by coincidence, since this apparently was a de facto common practice at the time..My company supported the initiative. Our status would be annotated on booking, emergency exit seats allocated on check in and cabin crew alerted on crew brief. i.e. " a friend in the cabin",
At the suggestion of friends in BALPA such individuals would not partake of alcohol during the flight.
I eventually got a patronizing letter back, apparently signed by Colin Marshall, thanking me for my interest, but assuring me that all of BA's established cabin procedures were perfectly adequate.
Yes , sure.
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Old 8th May 2019, 16:31
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I think one advantage of the LoCo quick turnaround model is a push for a more efficient safety briefing, which probably is easier to understand. Iíve seen EZ/FR crew tell pax to listen several times before. Well done!
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