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Atlas Air 767 down/Texas

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Atlas Air 767 down/Texas

Old 13th May 2019, 19:19
  #901 (permalink)  
 
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This accident was almost 3 months ago and nothing from the NTSB since the initial press reports. I know, they may take years, but as stated previously here, they usually have something out in 30 days.

Anyone know anyone on the "inside" for info?
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Old 13th May 2019, 22:25
  #902 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Old Boeing Driver View Post
This accident was almost 3 months ago and nothing from the NTSB since the initial press reports. I know, they may take years, but as stated previously here, they usually have something out in 30 days.

Anyone know anyone on the "inside" for info?
all gone silent....
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Old 13th May 2019, 22:42
  #903 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Old Boeing Driver View Post
This accident was almost 3 months ago and nothing from the NTSB since the initial press reports. I know, they may take years, but as stated previously here, they usually have something out in 30 days.

Anyone know anyone on the "inside" for info?
There is an interim or preliminary report on the NTSB website but it doesn’t say anything really.
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Old 15th May 2019, 22:05
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Scroll to 3:00 to get to the Atlas Air info

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Old 17th May 2019, 03:28
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Amazon's 1-Day Shipping Has an Alarming Downside That No One Is Talking About (Including Jeff Bezos)

Jeff Bezos made a surprise appearance this week at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky airport to break ground on a new Amazon Air hub, a three million-square-foot facility that will help the company make good on its recent promise of free one-day package delivery for its Prime members.

The Amazon chief showed a video of what the facility will look like, ceremoniously moved dirt himself (displaying skills as a heavy equipment operator), and proudly chirped that the Hub would soon be populated with "Prime Air" emblazoned airplanes.

What's not to like? More jobs, faster package delivery, advancement, and growth.

But there's another side to the coin, hinted at by the fact that the pomp and circumstance took place in a closed ceremony with carefully controlled messaging, blocking out representation of one important group in particular and one particularly important issue: pilot safety.

Pilots were not a part of the fanfare, and were literally being interviewed off to the side of the sideshow. Robert Kirchner, a 42-year pilot and chair of the executive council of Atlas Air (a cargo-shipping airline), pointed out in an onsite interview that the fact that the ceremony is a closed one is telling.

His fear is that safety is being compromised as exhausted pilots ferry an increasing amount of packages increasingly fast, while attrition of burned-out pilots is thinning the ranks of people qualified to fly the planes that enable one-day shipping in the first place.

"There's a large uptick in fatigue calls, sick calls. Pilots are just being worn out," noted Kirchner in an interview with local Cincinnati TV station WLWT. "There are a lot of canceled flights, a lot of delayed flights, due to the pilot shortage and the staffing stressed operation, and that doesn't bode well for the future of this enterprise that Amazon is breaking ground on today."

Also this week, Amazon addressed head-on how to find people to drive vehicles to deliver more packages, faster. The company offered current employees three-months' salary and $10,000 in startup funding to quit their current Amazon post and start a ground delivery business. Obviously, they can't offer the same program for employees to quit and fly cargo planes.

So how will they address the needs of getting enough pilots and giving the current cargo flight operators a reasonable schedule that won't compromise their health and safety?

The increased workload generated by shuttling packages around one day after being ordered adds on to the issue of an already well-documented pilot shortage (not to mention the intense trucking shortage). And it adds to the mounting problem of industrywide pilot fatigue.

It's the dark downside of the home shopping boom. Ever more packages delivered ever faster to our homes means more ground and air congestion, and more opportunities for safety disasters if not carefully thought through and planned for. I like getting my loofahs the next day as much as the next person, but at what cost?

I'm not saying one-day shipping can't be a boon for everyone, and I certainly hope it is. But let's have open conversations and open planning to safely enable it, not hide the warts under the shadowed tents of shiny, closed ceremonies.


PUBLISHED ON: MAY 16, 2019
Amazon's 1-Day Shipping Has an Alarming Downside That No One Is Talking About (Including Jeff Bezos)
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Old 17th May 2019, 03:36
  #906 (permalink)  
 
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Sadly, this is America now. As long as Wall Street is happy with the stock performance, everything else is immaterial.

Planes full of loofahs crashing? Who cares. Earnings dividends are being paid.
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Old 17th May 2019, 13:54
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Originally Posted by 413X3 View Post
Things are only bad these days says a country that used to enslave others as property and employ children to help profit ratios
Perhaps you mean England, the pilot flying's ancestors were owned by British masters in the Caribbean sugar trade.

Robert Kirchner, a 42-year pilot and chair of the executive council of Atlas Air (a cargo-shipping airline), pointed out in an onsite interview that the fact that the ceremony is a closed one is telling.
I've mentioned previously the Teamsters' long tradition of felony convictions of its leadership. Captain Kirchner certainly has street cred in this department.
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Old 17th May 2019, 17:43
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Originally Posted by FIRESYSOK View Post
Planes full of loofahs crashing? Who cares. Earnings dividends are being paid.
Exactly! If UPS6 crashed into the middle of Dubai, instead of into the desert outside the city, there would be no "cargo carveout" on crew rest rules.

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Old 17th May 2019, 20:00
  #909 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by FIRESYSOK View Post
Sadly, this is America now. As long as Wall Street is happy with the stock performance, everything else is immaterial.

Planes full of loofahs crashing? Who cares. Earnings dividends are being paid.
Isn't that the big flaw in capitalism? Everything done for the stockholders and owners. Fire people, close plants, cheat salaries of rank and file, skirt safety as long as they can, etc., etc.,
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Old 17th May 2019, 20:07
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Funny you should mention that, they have a long thread discussing that exact topic at CCRUNE.ORG (closet communist rumor network) and I'm sure they'd love to hear your input.
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Old 17th May 2019, 20:25
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Isn't that the big flaw in capitalism?
Apologies for the thread drift but strangely enough the topic was being discussed in our household today! Is capitalism failing? The conclusion was a resounding "YES"!
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Old 17th May 2019, 20:42
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If UPS6 crashed into the middle of Dubai, instead of into the desert outside the city, there would be no "cargo carveout" on crew rest rules.
I was on the Bahrain frq when the UPS 6 emergency unfolded and read the accident report with interest. I don’t recall duty hours being an issue.

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Old 17th May 2019, 21:03
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Originally Posted by Intruder View Post
Exactly! If UPS6 crashed into the middle of Dubai, instead of into the desert outside the city, there would be no "cargo carveout" on crew rest rules.
What the does UPS6 have to do with crew rest?
(edit - I see Small Cog beat me to it).
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Old 18th May 2019, 02:21
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Originally Posted by Old Boeing Driver View Post
Anyone know anyone on the "inside" for info?
If anyone is on the "inside", they're definitely not in a position to talk. But let's do a thought experiment here. If, as has been suggested, the PF responded to an inadvertent TOGA paddle press by pushing the nose down as hard as he could and then locking up, what safety bulletins would follow? "Hey, don't freak out and crash the plane"?
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Old 18th May 2019, 07:07
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Originally Posted by TRF4EVR View Post
.........what safety bulletins would follow? "Hey, don't freak out and crash the plane"?
Probably. A similar thing happened after the Turkish crash in Amsterdam. Conclusion: “if you fly an airplane, monitor your airspeed carefully when flying an ils approach.”
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Old 18th May 2019, 09:31
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I don’t understand the reference to ‘cargo carve out on crew rest’ ??
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Old 18th May 2019, 09:59
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Originally Posted by SquintyMagoo View Post
Isn't that the big flaw in capitalism? Everything done for the stockholders and owners. Fire people, close plants, cheat salaries of rank and file, skirt safety as long as they can, etc., etc.,
Yes it is.
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Old 18th May 2019, 13:55
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It's bigger than that

Originally Posted by porkflyer View Post
Yes it is.
It is not merely capitalism, it is much deeper than that: human nature itself, which is prone to corruption and greed. And elites in all economic and political systems (including the "socialist paradise") look after themselves instead of common folk.
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Old 18th May 2019, 13:59
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Originally Posted by tdracer View Post
What the does UPS6 have to do with crew rest?
It has to do with the quoted reference I cited:
Planes full of loofahs crashing? Who cares. Earnings dividends are being paid.
The tendency is that nobody pays attention to an airplane crash where nobody is hurt except the pilots. Hence, a large segment of the industry is saddled with a lesser level of safety and regulatory scrutiny than the passenger carriers.

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Old 18th May 2019, 16:19
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Originally Posted by Intruder View Post
The tendency is that nobody pays attention to an airplane crash where nobody is hurt except the pilots. Hence, a large segment of the industry is saddled with a lesser level of safety and regulatory scrutiny than the passenger carriers.
Excepting the NTSB.

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