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2 kenya airways e190 collide

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2 kenya airways e190 collide

Old 10th Feb 2019, 16:18
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2 kenya airways e190 collide

Not sure why but my last thread seems to have been been removed. Here is a beter link than the one I posted last time

https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/vide...tenance-mishap

Think it will be more than a few days before back in service
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Old 10th Feb 2019, 19:16
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As smart as the Engineers think they are, they should NOT be at the controls of any aeroplane!!!!!!!!!

I don’t pretend that I can change gaskets or top the oil up on a GP7270E.........
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Old 10th Feb 2019, 20:05
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Originally Posted by White Knight View Post
As smart as the Engineers think they are, they should NOT be at the controls of any aeroplane!!!!!!!!!
I don’t pretend that I can change gaskets or top the oil up on a GP7270E.........
In my over 40 years of aircraft maintenance experience since 1969, including on wing engine testing (RB211), I have never had the pleasure of a 'Pilot' at the controls. The 1st aircraft I have seen jump chocks during power runs, was a BEA Comet 4 at Heathrow which embedded itself in a hangar door . Sadly Engineers seldom get the chance to experience power runs in a live simulator but then Pilots probable never carry out a full power run with wheels chocked and hand brake set on a live aircraft in the confines of a maintenance base. I have had aircraft move in the later condition but luckily controlled before striking any ground objects. Dry conditions with better designed chocks might have prevented this occurrence in a clear run up area also if the maintenance personnel were taking readings, head down, they might well have not sensed the aircraft movement and been able to pull back power and apply foot brakes in time.
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 16:07
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Originally Posted by White Knight View Post
As smart as the Engineers think they are, they should NOT be at the controls of any aeroplane!!!!!!!!!
Yeah! Who ever heared of a pilot breaking a plane??
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 16:46
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Originally Posted by White Knight View Post
As smart as the Engineers think they are, they should NOT be at the controls of any aeroplane!!!!!!!!!
what a ridiculously un-educated response. We're clever enough to keep them serviceable working ridiculously long shifts (No ftls for us minions) at all hours of the night, but not to do egr's. Get real.
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 17:19
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As smart as the Engineers think they are, they should NOT be at the controls of any aeroplane!!!!!!!!!

Hmm.....Please enlighten us who you currently fly for! I'm sure the Engineers there would be very keen to hear your views and give you the due respect you obviously deserve!

Last edited by boeing_eng; 11th Feb 2019 at 19:01.
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 17:24
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Originally Posted by White Knight View Post
As smart as the Engineers think they are, they should NOT be at the controls of any aeroplane!!!!!!!!!

I don’t pretend that I can change gaskets or top the oil up on a GP7270E.........
I think as long as they leave the flying part to us it is OK. You think the push-back should be done by a pilot as well?
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 17:29
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Ive only ever seen one aircraft jump a chock.
C130 on startup.
Airframe totalled.
Full crew at the controls.
Ground Engineer on long lead moved faster than the wind.
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Old 11th Feb 2019, 22:09
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Comet, C-130.....any pics of some of these or other engine runs incidents of the past. Have already seen the Etihad one.
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 20:12
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Originally Posted by punkalouver View Post
Comet, C-130.....any pics of some of these or other engine runs incidents of the past. Have already seen the Etihad one.

Engine-run, loss of control, aircraft ran over the truck.


Maintenance startup with power-levers firewalled.


Engine-run, lost control.

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Old 13th Feb 2019, 20:53
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I'd posted the below on a different thread without having seen this one..


KQ stated "Both planes were scheduled to return to service in the next few days hence no disruption to normal operations". To me, this seems like the most backwards, untrue statement there can be! More like.. "they were scheduled to return to service in the next few days, therefore we will likely have to reduce some flight operations, especially as there are other 190s in our fleet that are soon do for a C check".

Full KQ statement here

What would it entail and how long might it take to restore these aircraft to airworthy condition? I don't know really anything at all about this type of damage and situation, but would I be wrong in thinking something like the following?
  • New engine cowl, new nose, radar assembly, new pylon, and possibly engine flown to Nairobi and installed.
  • Rest of fuselage repaired in Nairobi to "ferry standard". Is this a thing?
  • Flown to OGMA in Portugal to be brought back to airworthy standard for commercial service. From what I can see, OGMA is owned by Embraer and one of two service centers in the world that can do this level of repair.







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Old 16th Feb 2019, 18:18
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Kenya Airways is staring at an operational headache after three of its aircraft were pulled out of service this week, following two separate incidents.

On Tuesday evening, a Boeing Dreamliner 787 enroute to Johannesburg had to make an emergency landing in Dar es Salaam after it developed mechanical problems in mid-air.

Engineers in Nairobi had detected an issue with the aircraft but it was cleared to fly after it was ruled out as a false alarm. In Dar es Salaam, the aircraft blew one of its GEnx engines, putting it out of service.

“The aircraft made an emergency landing in Dar and it was then decided that the flight be cancelled. Passengers were booked into a hotel and flown to Johannesburg the next day via South African Airways,” a source said.

https://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/bus...srw/index.html

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Old 17th Feb 2019, 10:22
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Knowing nothing about full power ground engine runs, (I only use full power to get airborne on days when flex power is not sufficient), I am surprised that aircraft being tested statically at full power are not chained or otherwise fixed to hard points in the engine run-up bay.

Relying on loose chocks and brakes and a human’s reactions to chop the power seems a bit dodgy to be honest.

I would have thought that at the very least, some sort of main wheel sized chocks that bolt to the ground would have been used.
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Old 17th Feb 2019, 12:29
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Ignore the troll tryin it on about engineers. I doubt he/ she is a “ professional pilot “ , as this place is riddled with spotters these days.

I used to do full power engine runs on 757 on the parking brake , shaking like hell they were.
I had to do it because company wouldn’t authorise or train the engineers to taxi them , which I thought was very short sighted
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Old 17th Feb 2019, 13:46
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Just 'cause I looked it up:

Sec. 25.735

Brakes.
.....
(d) Parking brake. The airplane must have a parking brake control that, when selected on, will, without further attention, prevent the airplane from rolling on a dry and level paved runway when the most adverse combination of maximum thrust on one engine and up to maximum ground idle thrust on any, or all, other engine(s) is applied. The control must be suitably located or be adequately protected to prevent inadvertent operation. There must be indication in the cockpit when the parking brake is not fully released.
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Old 17th Feb 2019, 15:24
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I once was asked to to some ground testing of a 737 that had some issues with the engine anti ice systems.
I’m not a test pilot in any way, so I agreed to taxi the aircraft into posistion and transferred controls to the tech guy who then did the engine run.
I was not going to take the blame for anything going wrong. This was a management by fear airline, so it was important to keep your back clear.
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Old 18th Feb 2019, 04:46
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I was not going to take the blame for anything going wrong.
Actually, you would have. The fact that you where on board would lay some blame squarely on your shoulders. I doubt you have the authority to “transfer controls” in such a way.

I don’t get involved in maintenance. I sign the tech log, and then I get off. Unless the engineer gives me an aircraft that is released for flight, I turn around and get right off.

As as you say, in today’s world of accountant and lawyer driven management, I have zero interest in putting my lisense on the line for those looking for scapegoats when it all goes pear shaped.

If maintenance needs a plane repo’ed, I can help. But all maintenance will take place after I sign the tech log and get off the aircraft.
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Old 18th Feb 2019, 06:38
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A couple more incidents here. I remember an A310 in Vancouver that was run into a hangar. Some CB's were pulled during the test run and may have affected the brakes. If anyone has further info, it would be appreciated.

Accident: Air Transat A313 at Rio de Janeiro on Dec 13th 2009, jumps chocks during engine tests and rolls "hunting"

https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-n...amages-learjet
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