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The Biggest Jet Engines in History Are Finally Ready to Power Boeing's Biggest Plane

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The Biggest Jet Engines in History Are Finally Ready to Power Boeing's Biggest Plane

Old 7th Jan 2019, 13:58
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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That's just some sort of crazy science fiction.
From 1938 actually....


And although the engine is the biggest, it is not the most powerful one.
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 15:14
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Buster15 View Post
Less than sonic you can be sure of that.
If you put money on that, you'd lose your bet.
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Old 7th Jan 2019, 16:03
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Buster15 View Post
Less than sonic you can be sure of that.

More like a bull whip where just the tip goes sonic but the innards are moving more slowly

I was in a western act once as the dummy where the cowboy snapped the whip several times for effect and then lashed out at me and wrapped it around my body before the sonic tip finished up the wrap now much slower
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 07:13
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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This article popped up on my newsfeed. Seems the GE9X engines are not quite ready yet. The logistics of moving them back to the factory are a story in itself: https://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...r-issu-460379/
GE Aviation is recalling four GE9X powerplants from Boeing to address a previously disclosed engine compressor issue that already forced Boeing to delay the 777X's first flight.

News of the recall surfaced in a 19 August regulatory filing with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) by Russia's Volga-Dnepr Airlines, which has applied for rights to fly the engines from Washington state to Ohio.
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 07:31
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Interesting that in this day and age they contracted the job with the "Russian" Antonov (vs Ukrainian).
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 09:08
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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I fully appreciate the complexities of modern aviation manufacturing and production, but phrases like 'more haste, less speed' and 'it looks like carelessness' keep popping into my head. GE has already told investors that having already faced a US$600 million cashflow hit so far, it could face a further US$800 million hit if the MAX remains grounded and faces further exposure through its aircraft leasing unit.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/31/ge-w...g-737-max.html

The GE9X problems pushing the first 777X flight into 2020 and deliveries perhaps into 2021 is not helpful to Boeing or GE cashflow, given the other problems. With 150 777Xs on order Emirates won't be pleased either.

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...o-2020-459877/

I don't know why people are wary of folding wing tips. After all we have seen how Boeing takes as long as necessary to thoroughly test all aspects of new models and ensures crews are fully aware of and trained in all aspects of the monitoring, dynamics and control systems are thoroughly documented in every detail (including simulator training for all) with sensors that are multiply redundant, ensuring no unexpected malfunctions or system faults could arise to confuse crews or cause accidents, because safety comes first. I have every confidence that the folding wing tips will have been developed, tested and documented with training to be provided to the same high standards.

https://www.airlineratings.com/wp-co...85075200_n.jpg
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 12:26
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by atakacs View Post
Interesting that in this day and age they contracted the job with the "Russian" Antonov (vs Ukrainian).
Perhaps their (Volga-Dnepr's) bid was cheaper than Antonov Airlines'.

Last edited by DaveReidUK; 21st Aug 2019 at 15:16. Reason: Edited to clarify that we're only talking about An-124 operators here
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 13:52
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
Perhaps their bid was cheaper.
US-based airlines are unable to transport the massive GE9Xs, which ship on a stand measuring roughly 8 x 4 x 4m (26 x 14 x 13ft) and weighing 36,000lb (16,300kg). GE had used Antonov aircraft before to transport GE90s to Boeing in the early stages of the GE90 powered 777 program.
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 14:21
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Turbine D View Post
US-based airlines are unable to transport the massive GE9Xs, which ship on a stand measuring roughly 8 x 4 x 4m (26 x 14 x 13ft) and weighing 36,000lb (16,300kg). GE had used Antonov aircraft before to transport GE90s to Boeing in the early stages of the GE90 powered 777 program.
What a good thing then the US in the Cold War had a longstanding political mutual-destruction standoff with the Soviets. The Antonov 124 heavy lifter was designed principally to move ICBMs around the country, to airfields where the comparably gargantuan Mil-12 helicopter would move individual ones to deployment sites in the forest. Incidentally, the An124 (first flight 1982) seems to have a wingspan actually greater than the 777X
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 14:23
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Original post by RTM Boy:
I fully appreciate the complexities of modern aviation manufacturing and production, but phrases like 'more haste, less speed' and 'it looks like carelessness' keep popping into my head. GE has already told investors that having already faced a US$600 million cashflow hit so far, it could face a further US$800 million hit if the MAX remains grounded and faces further exposure through its aircraft leasing unit.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/07/31/ge-w...g-737-max.html

The GE9X problems pushing the first 777X flight into 2020 and deliveries perhaps into 2021 is not helpful to Boeing or GE cashflow, given the other problems. With 150 777Xs on order Emirates won't be pleased either.
The testing of engines on a test stand doesn't necessarily find all the problems that might exist in engines in the air. So GE identified a durability problem with a compressor stator vane that could have been a problem in certification testing or airline service during flight testing on GE's 747 test aircraft prior to the start Boeing's aircraft certification process. I don't consider that "carelessness" at all. I am sure Emirates is disappointed with the introduction delay, but pleased the problem was found before receiving and flying engines with this defective compressor vane.

I bet you Rolls Royce wishes they would discovered the sulfidation/corrosion problem on the Trent 1000 engine in the early stages of certification before having so many engines in revenue service with various airlines.
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 14:40
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Turbine D View Post
US-based airlines are unable to transport the massive GE9Xs, which ship on a stand measuring roughly 8 x 4 x 4m (26 x 14 x 13ft) and weighing 36,000lb (16,300kg). GE had used Antonov aircraft before to transport GE90s to Boeing in the early stages of the GE90 powered 777 program.
May I suggest Boeing’s own B.744F derivative the ‘Boeing Dreamlifter’
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_Dreamlifter
In house, designed and built by highly reputable company, verified by globally trusted Authority!
Be lucky
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 17:49
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by The AvgasDinosaur View Post

May I suggest Boeing’s own B.744F derivative the ‘Boeing Dreamlifter’
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_Dreamlifter
In house, designed and built by highly reputable company, verified by globally trusted Authority!
Be lucky
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Yes, but according to the article you posted:
It is an extensively modified Boeing 747-400 that is used exclusively for transporting Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft components to Boeing's assembly plants from suppliers around the world.
No mention of the ability of transporting GE90 engines...
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 17:52
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Merika has been folding wingtips since before World War II.
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 20:00
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
Perhaps their (Volga-Dnepr's) bid was cheaper than Antonov Airlines'.
I guessed along those lines... But with the current feud going on between Ukraine and Russia and Antonov making their outmost to have the Volga Dnepr fleet grounded I am still surprised to see a US company contracting with them to fly within the US. Anyway a bit of a thread drift 🤔
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 20:04
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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Turbine, I don't know about the GE9X, but you can transport a GE90 (or GEnx) in a 747F - the catch being you need to remove the fan module and ship it as two pieces. That's actually fairly easy with a GEnx due to the modular design, somewhat more involved with a GE90.
Boeing looked at making the Large Cargo Freighter - aka the 'Dreamlifter' - available 'for hire' for transporting outsized cargo. Two things killed that - first off it would have complicated the certification and operation of the LCF relative to having it dedicated to moving 787 bits (read more time and money). However the real show stopper was that the four LCFs are already booked pretty solid simply supporting 787 production. In fact, if one gets pranged (or worse) and is out of service for any length of time, it'll affect the 787 production rate.
I was in a meeting many moons ago where it was proposed that they contract to build a fifth LCF while the tooling and expertise was still available - where it was pointed out that only have four would be seriously limiting (especially if one got damaged). They got turned down because upper management didn't want to spend the money.
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Old 21st Aug 2019, 20:43
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by tdracer View Post

I was in a meeting many moons ago where it was proposed that they contract to build a fifth LCF while the tooling and expertise was still available - where it was pointed out that only have four would be seriously limiting (especially if one got damaged). They got turned down because upper management didn't want to spend the money.
Correct me if I’m wrong, but I heard somewhere that Airbus’s Beluga fleet is hired out when not shuttling between Hamburg, Broughton, Toulouse and Madrid and that this contract work pretty much pays for their own movements.

Speculate to accumulate.
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Old 23rd Aug 2019, 17:30
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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Shipping The GE9X Engine

Here is a video that depicts shipping a GE9X engine from Victorville to Peebles, GE's outdoor testing facility in Ohio:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4PMJ...ature=youtu.be
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Old 23rd Aug 2019, 18:23
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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Given that GE manufactures these engines (to my knowledge) in Ohio, can someone tell me how are GE is planning on shipping them to Washington State for installation in 777X's when production actually gets going? I doubt it will be via AN-124s.
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Old 23rd Aug 2019, 18:29
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by SeenItAll View Post
Given that GE manufactures these engines (to my knowledge) in Ohio, can someone tell me how are GE is planning on shipping them to Washington State for installation in 777X's when production actually gets going? I doubt it will be via AN-124s.
By road. At night.
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Old 23rd Aug 2019, 18:41
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by SeenItAll View Post
Given that GE manufactures these engines (to my knowledge) in Ohio, can someone tell me how are GE is planning on shipping them to Washington State for installation in 777X's when production actually gets going? I doubt it will be via AN-124s.
It will be mainly by truck using the interstate highway system or other roads where clearances have been thoroughly checked out, day or night. If need be, engines can be shipped by heavy lift aircraft, e.g., AN-124s. This was done in the early days of the GE90 production to support Boeing's 777 aircraft schedules at the time.
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