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Anyone got some T-cut?

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Anyone got some T-cut?

Old 25th May 2018, 14:33
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Smile

Originally Posted by Cynical Sid
Wonder if they used a tub of Vaseline to ease it out.
Are you referring to something in the frame at the end of the above video?

mjb
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Old 25th May 2018, 15:25
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Wink

Originally Posted by DaveReidUK
The photos appear to show he was being towed on to G91, which is the innermost stand in the 45° angle between International Pier G and the parking garage/International train station.

GE suggests there is approximately 120 feet between the curved yellow stand lead-in and the station piers at the closest point - half an A333's wingspan is 99 feet ...
You're right, Dave, and as he was about 20 feet off the lead-in line, the math works out just about right.
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Old 25th May 2018, 18:21
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Originally Posted by A4
What about a temporary attachment? You (somehow!?) attach proximity transmitters to the wingtips / tail - simple strapon or clamp - and have the prox receiver in the tug. No need to retrofit at $xx,000,000, just a local kit to get used repeatedly on multiple aircraft.

You’re welcome........

A4
A4 Are you suggesting that the aircraft stop on the taxiway to have these clamped on sensor installed then taxi or tow to the terminal. Not a practical solution. Some one had the proper idea with a wing walker and eyes on task.
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Old 25th May 2018, 18:30
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Originally Posted by jetfour
My Ford has efficient proximity sensors! Ok, it will be more complex on an aircraft to tug situation - but surely not impossible. Commercial opportunity for someone!
Yes, because an aircraft is just like a car and at IKEA you can buy rubber thingies to put on the tip of things so you wont bump in to them.
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Old 25th May 2018, 20:15
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Originally Posted by roybert
A4 Are you suggesting that the aircraft stop on the taxiway to have these clamped on sensor installed then taxi or tow to the terminal. Not a practical solution. Some one had the proper idea with a wing walker and eyes on task.
Although I have to agree that this 'should not happen' if people are paying attention the fact that they still do suggests that additional tech might be useful.

I don't believe additional sensors are needed, just think "ground ops collision avoidance" with each aircraft transmitting it's current (GPS assisted) speed, location and orientation.
A central computer could then issue alerts for AC to AC or AC to fixed obstacle proximity using a static map of the facility.
For towing tugs would also need to transmit/receive warnings.
The tug can probably determine (powered down) aircraft orientation using angle sensors at both ends of tow bar, that would still leave open someone entering incorrect AC type.

Of course unless every baggage cart and boarding ramp was active things could (and would) still go wrong.
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Old 25th May 2018, 22:11
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Originally Posted by MurphyWasRight
I don't believe additional sensors are needed, just think "ground ops collision avoidance" with each aircraft transmitting it's current (GPS assisted) speed, location and orientation.
Ironically, the aircraft in question would in fact have been doing exactly that.
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Old 25th May 2018, 22:21
  #27 (permalink)  
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bnt
Should the tow driver follow the pair of white lines painted on the ground in front of the airplane?!?

Maybe they're there for a reason...
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Old 26th May 2018, 07:44
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Looking at the image from the car park, which shows the alignment of the towing vehicle pretty clearly, I'm wondering whether the driver / wing walkers understood the phenomenon of 'swept wing growth'?

When the VC10 entered RAF service, there were a lot of educational posters showing the hazards associated with towing swept wing aircraft....

Training?
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Old 26th May 2018, 08:12
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Originally Posted by BEagle
...

Training?
How much training do these subcontractors of subcontractors get?
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Old 26th May 2018, 09:09
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Originally Posted by visibility3miles
Should the tow driver follow the pair of white lines painted on the ground in front of the airplane?!?

Maybe they're there for a reason...
Yes, the white lines are there for a reason - they delineate the airside roadway that runs along the back of the Golf stands. Following those when towing an aircraft would have had an even worse outcome.

As a general rule, white lines are for landlubbers, yellow ones are for aircraft.

Here's G91, courtesy of GE:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
KSFO G91.jpg (123.2 KB, 394 views)
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Old 27th May 2018, 03:55
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Crikey! Going to need no. 1 man ( oops, or woman or in-between ) driving the tug to get a wide-body out of there unscathed.
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Old 27th May 2018, 06:08
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Or maybe someone who wasn't flipping burgers last week.
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Old 28th May 2018, 03:38
  #33 (permalink)  
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DavidReidUK

Thank you for the explanation.

I stand corrected.
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Old 28th May 2018, 08:36
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Originally Posted by roybert
A4 Are you suggesting that the aircraft stop on the taxiway to have these clamped on sensor installed then taxi or tow to the terminal. Not a practical solution. Some one had the proper idea with a wing walker and eyes on task.

I thought possibly a semi autonomous quadcopter. It hovers 100 feet above the aircraft and acts as a remote camera platform for manoevours in tight spaces.
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Old 28th May 2018, 08:54
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Originally Posted by c_coder
I thought possibly a semi autonomous quadcopter. It hovers 100 feet above the aircraft and acts as a remote camera platform for manoevours in tight spaces.
Best perhaps to mount sensors or cameras directly to the buildings in question. No need to operate a drone or modify / add sensors to aircraft.
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Old 28th May 2018, 12:56
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK

Here's G91, courtesy of GE:

That centreline track for the stand has to be the daftest one i have seen - not surprised that they have accidents. If you want to put in zigzag lines like that then best you restrict the stand to narrowbodies.
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Old 28th May 2018, 16:33
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I assume it has been moved?

If so, how did they do it?
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Old 28th May 2018, 18:09
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Originally Posted by Chris2303
I assume it has been moved?

If so, how did they do it?
Carefully ?

Aircraft returned to Dublin on the day following the incident.
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Old 28th May 2018, 23:12
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Maybe winglets are a MEL Item
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Old 29th May 2018, 14:27
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Originally Posted by Pugilistic Animus
Maybe winglets are a MEL Item
It's a CDL item - you can have one removed and just tape up the holes.
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