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IATA concerned about increase in problem passengers

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IATA concerned about increase in problem passengers

Old 7th Oct 2016, 21:51
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Poor kid may not be keen to fly again. Plastic bottle or not, if I was the parents I'd take the culprits to court and sue their ar$eS off!
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Old 7th Oct 2016, 21:53
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yepp, but unfortunate not much will happen to those guys..
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 12:44
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If we want solutions we need to look at what happens to the pax long before they get to the aircraft. Start with an early wake up, stressed on the journey to the airport (M25, anyone?), remote parking, long cheque-in queues, queue for immigration, queue for security, clock's ticking...the security process itself (nuff said, if they weren't wound up before they are now), get bombarded though duty free (LGW and STN force you to and it's a horrible environment), not enough seating, confusing signage (I'm frequently asked to help lost and confused pax) and that's when its going smoothy! No wonder they want a drink. So they arrive at the aircraft stressed and tipsy, add to that 1 in 4 people are afraid of flying and it's not surprising it's an explosive mix. In my opinion, the airports and airlines need to be address their considerable contribution to passenger well-being before we can make headway in tackling this problem.
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 13:33
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I have been through similar experiences, dozens of times at numerous airports, and have never felt the need to get rat-arsed. The problem is caused by a sub-set of humanity who have no regard for others and lack the morals for self control. The only solution is to ensure they are kept separate from booze in the run up to departure and heavy penalties plus a long no-fly ban for anyone who cannot behave. A few examples with their passports stamped "not valid for air travel" would concentrate minds.
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 15:03
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The problem is caused by a sub-set of humanity who have no regard for others and lack the morals for self control.
That is exactly it!
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 15:11
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I don't know how much effect the "Duty Free" contributes but to be honest I have never understood why you have to buy DF on departure. This is just more weight to be carried both by individuals and aircraft. If you are gullible enough to buy DF, then make it available at the arrival airport.
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 16:11
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If you are gullible enough to buy DF, then make it available at the arrival airport.
Which is the case in some countries.
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 19:33
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Why do you consider purchasers of Duty-free goods as being gullible?
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 20:25
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Probably because, outside of booze, fume and smokes on non-EU flights, the prices are exorbitant. Ever been in want of a pair of socks, undies, a tie or a pair of trouser, and found the airport shops your only option? And don't even get me started on the food and drinks.

But it's no wonder the prices are so high; rent per square meter at a major airport, will usually exceed by a large margin, that of the high street in the city it serves.
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 20:30
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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In the 29 July 2016 edition of the Independent, their travel correspondent Simon Calder wrote about this subject. He informed readers that UK aviation minister Lord Ahmad had vowed to tackle drink - fuelled air rage.
Simon Calder`s comment was:
"My research on two years of Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) “reportable occurrences” of air rage show alcohol is the principle trigger of inflight disruption. In the two years to March 2016 an average of four people a week were arrested on suspicion of being drunk on a plane or at an airport. And worldwide, one aviation security expert estimates alcohol-fuelled air rage affects around 50 flights a day."

Simon raised a number of questions, an interesting one is what could happen in an emergency evacuation. Would a paraletic moron, totally sozzled out of its (cannot possibly refer to such loathsome creatures as his/her ) miniscule brain not present a fearful danger to itself and all others who chance the misfortune of sharing a cabin with it. And if there is a group of them, then surely any measure of risk is bound to go exponentially off the scale.

Here is the link to the news article.
Airport alcohol rule changes: What you need to know about the new rules on drinking as an airline passenger | The Independent

To all those who consider that there are "half measures", I`d say forget it, those imbeciles don`t go by half measures, they would quite happily drink a distillery dry and still ask for more.
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 20:41
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I'm sorry not to have had time to sift through all the above…

When I operate a typically problematic flight [ie: late night IBZ amongst others], I have the airport police at the gate with the dispatcher and am up there when able to say if I'm not going to accept a pax due to behaviour, that in my opinion, is lightly to cause a safety issue to the flight, or other passengers, due to the appearance of being intoxicated through drink or drugs, or for any reason I believe might may be detrimental to the safety flight.

I want people to have a safe flight, and yes, enjoy a drink, but I don't want passengers to have to sit next to a drunk who will be sick all over themselves, or the passengers next to them!

And, finally… When your aircraft is delayed from the previous sector [flight], it might just have been because your carrier had to recover/replace a row of seats due to projectile vomit.. So are you going to claim from the passenger? the airline? the duty free store? or litigate the passenger?

Answers on a post card please…

That is why I don't let clearly drunk people on my flight! I don't want to sit next to them, do you?

Last edited by fokker1000; 8th Oct 2016 at 20:44. Reason: typo
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 22:27
  #52 (permalink)  
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Bravo!
Pubs and clubs have the right to refuse entry to anyone. There doesn't have to be a legitimate reason (though refusal because of skin colour can be dodgy) - but anyone who is obviously drunk is a prime candidate for exclusion.
The same should apply to aircraft.
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Old 8th Oct 2016, 23:56
  #53 (permalink)  
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Sorry if this had been seen before but just thought this snippet might slot in here.




From Business Insider UK Susan Fiske, a professor at Princeton University, cited a study that was published in May 2016.

My Bold. If true, what an astonishing observation.


1. Simply walking through first class on a plane can make economy passengers really, really angry

Researchers found that fliers who were reminded of social inequality were more likely to get angry and start "air-rage" incidents, becoming abusive or unruly toward crew members and other passengers.

Specifically, air-rage incidents in the economy class were nearly four times more common in planes with a first-class cabin. And those incidents were more than twice as common in planes that required passengers to board from the front, meaning everyone had to walk through the first-class cabin.

Bottom line: No one likes being reminded that other people are getting better treatment than they are, especially after they've shelled out a hefty sum for a flight.
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Old 9th Oct 2016, 00:04
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LR...

Can't remember the last time I saw a first class cabin on Ryanair, Easyjet, Jet2.com, Monarch, etc...

It may be true, but the greater truism is that chavs, alcohol and aircraft don't - or shouldn't - mix.

And "hefty sum"? With flight's starting at 9.99 I'm not sure it's hefty.
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Old 9th Oct 2016, 15:02
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No one likes being reminded that other people are getting better treatment than they are, especially after they've shelled out a hefty sum for a flight.
What utter nonsense! You pay for what you can afford. If you want a better lifestyle you need a good income. If you want a good income you work hard for it. End of. As for shelling out a hefty sum, what do you think those in Business Class have shelled out then? Finally, as already mentioned, most of the operators who suffer above average disruption don't even have Business or First class. No, the truth is that the pond life of society can now afford to fly and behave on a/c just as they do in the street.
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Old 9th Oct 2016, 16:51
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IATA reports 11,000 incidents in a year. A big increase from the previous but still insignificant compared to the 18,000,000 yearly flights (back of the envelope guess).

Those airlines that suffer it need to look at their practices and the practices of their partners. For example telling an airport they will find an alternative if they don't control booze sales. Random breathalyser checks reported in the daily mail would have a significant effect, methinks.
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Old 9th Oct 2016, 17:40
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Major fail by whoever handles RYR at EDI.
Do they have handlers?

No, the truth is that the pond life of society can now afford to fly and behave on a/c just as they do in the street.
And there is the problem. I intimated it in an earlier post. However, slightly more complex. The airports, giving the low co operators minimum charge operation, look to recoup the money from the shopping mall sales approach. A Weatherspoons, or equivalent, is also conveniently provided, for the punters. A case in point was the Irish Bar, at Beauvais, France. I once boarded the last flight, RYR, on a Friday night, to GOW, with my family. I had missed my CDG flight. There were animals urinating in the aisle. It was astonishing.

Anyway, thats how they behave in the street, and they do not differentiate when in an aeroplane. You reap what you sow, as the saying goes...
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Old 9th Oct 2016, 19:56
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As for shelling out a hefty sum, what do you think those in Business Class have shelled out then?
In my case, absolutely nothing at all, every time I've been in Business Class - my employer has paid every single time.
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Old 9th Oct 2016, 20:28
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Folks, for those that do not believe there are any issues. On a certain loco, on certain flights, to a certain party island, lines of what resembles talcum powder, are being cut off the tables. Now, for the uninitiated, HepB is a danger. The way to combat that is cover the tables in Olive Oil, but not sure the CC have worked that out. Alcohol is frankly the tip of the iceberg..and the least, frankly, of the problems.
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Old 9th Oct 2016, 20:28
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Same here. I value my meagre cache of cash (thank you) to pay for business class. My employer doesn't share my scruples. I thought there was an inquiry or something about the availability of alcohol at airports proposed.
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