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Plane in a tree, Germany

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Plane in a tree, Germany

Old 16th Aug 2016, 12:15
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Plane in a tree, Germany

Crashed microlight pilot spends night in tree in Germany - BBC News

Despite the description of it being a microlight..
I'm interested as to what the thing that looks like a parachute is? Someone fitted a Cirrus-esque chute to a classic? Or did the guy try to parachute from the tree?
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Old 16th Aug 2016, 12:52
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It's actually Cirrus who took the idea from the microlight community.
BRS (Ballistic Recovery System) has been producing rocket launched parachutes for hang gliders and microlights since the mid 80'.
Aside of that, if you crash in the trees (and survive it) and are trapped onto the canopy without a proper rope, your dorsal (or seat) parachute is the best mean to go down from your ship : not base jumping, but unfolding it to use the lines...
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Old 16th Aug 2016, 13:13
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Sure, i'm well aware of that. But it's not a microlight, its a biplane which i cant quite identify
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Old 16th Aug 2016, 13:19
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It's called a Platzer Motte, legally a microlight.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platzer_Motte
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Old 16th Aug 2016, 13:45
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Was it a Plane tree?

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Old 16th Aug 2016, 14:07
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Ah ok my apologies to the BBC then. So it does have a ballistic parachute, i see references to previous accidents on that type using them.
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Old 16th Aug 2016, 18:39
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Better than my friend's brother in a microlight in Saskatchewan: R.I.P.
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Old 16th Aug 2016, 19:51
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Microlights, or Ultralights as they are called in germany (up to 472,5kg MTOW), have to have a BRS fitted, it is a basic airworthiness requirement for them. Well, at least it is in germany, might be different in different countries as it is a class of aircraft that is not regulated by the EASA, it still is regulated by each country on its own.
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Old 16th Aug 2016, 20:26
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Basil, that is a flex-wing 'weightshift' control microlight. 3 axis control microlights are available. They are just very lightweight aircraft.

EG. CFM Shadow

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Old 16th Aug 2016, 22:46
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And horribly uncomfortable on a hot summer day.
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Old 17th Aug 2016, 02:58
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Was it a Plane tree?

Even as we speak, my minions are seeking you out for that....
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Old 17th Aug 2016, 05:42
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I was surprised when a neighbor started flying a atec 122 zephyr, learning that it was an ultralight. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATEC_122_Zephyr_2000

Apparently also fitted with a BRS! Impressive what they can do even with such a low weight...
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Old 17th Aug 2016, 06:36
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Not the first time. Who can forget Captain Biggles..
http://www.pprune.org/private-flying...wn-dundee.html
BBC NEWS | UK | Scotland | Pilot: Biggles tale saved me
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Old 17th Aug 2016, 07:55
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The aircraft was lodged in the tree about 30m (98ft) above ground near Degenfeld and the rescuers had to abandon initial attempts to bring him down as night fell.
Does no one teach cadet journalists not to use inappropriate precision? If it's 'about' 30m it's about 100 feet, unless it's been roughly measured.
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Old 17th Aug 2016, 09:04
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Originally Posted by Hydromet View Post
Does no one teach cadet journalists not to use inappropriate precision? If it's 'about' 30m it's about 100 feet, unless it's been roughly measured.
I encountered the same when we 'decimalised'.
Imperial fractional dimensions on drawings were converted to 4 decimal places of millimetres.
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