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Kamchatka crash: Both pilots drunk

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Kamchatka crash: Both pilots drunk

Old 16th Oct 2012, 21:39
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The mere fact they feel the need to test all crews before flight is enough of a worry for me. . . I did two Summer seasons with airBaltic (not so long ago part of the Soviet Union & still VERY much under the influence . . . Hic! of the Motherland ) & random alcohol tests were very much a normal day to day occurence there. . .the first company I have ever experienced this. . .why ? well, draw your own conclusions.
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Old 16th Oct 2012, 22:05
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six years fying in/out russia every week, I can tell you how much these guys can drink. I still remember my first night in Moscow.

F/A I have had flying with me came from different companies and toasting with Vodka for a save flight was item 1 before starting engines on the QRH and last item before leaving the aircraft. "Russian Standard" SOPīs.

BTW, all ex USSR countries share the same way of thinking and I still canīt get it.
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Old 16th Oct 2012, 22:12
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Icelanta.......

Russian aviation is NOT unsafe in general
So why do they have so many crashes?
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Old 16th Oct 2012, 22:31
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Biggest country in the world, some of the most difficult flying in the world, some of the worst equipment in the world. But they still get the job done, and mostly in a very professional way. we are still keeping these cold war opinions, they are nowadays absolutely incorrect and we should look more into our own plates, because not all of it is tasty.
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Old 17th Oct 2012, 01:12
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Yeah, but...

When I was fortunate enough to fly to Riga on vacations several yrs ago, I would go out of my way to fly DL to Moscow and catch the nightly TU-154 to Riga...

Never a problem...excellent service and the old 154 is built like the proverbial S.H...a great sense of security...

But to each their own...sorry Aeroflot retired the old bird...
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Old 17th Oct 2012, 01:37
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Quote: Russian aviation is NOT unsafe in general

So why do they have so many crashes?
Reminds me of what a FedEx pilot said about the MD-11: 'It's a great plane, it just crashes a lot!'
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Old 17th Oct 2012, 05:49
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A TV documentary shown in Aus in the late 90's on the ABC, possibly a BBC or Granada production, called Aeroplanski, had numerous references to pre & inflight imbibing.
I remember seeing that, or a similar, documentary, it was shown on SATV. There was one scene which sticks in my memory, of a group of middle-aged pilots sitting at a table before flying, knocking back vodka. One said : "No vorry for drink. Look for age of pilot, old pilot good pilot, young pilot maybe not so good. Nazhdarovya!"
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Old 17th Oct 2012, 09:17
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Crashing in Russia

I was in a helicopter crash on the Kola peninsular some years ago, eventually got back to flying after 7 months off sick.

It seemed to me, with a grand total of 2 hours flying helos, that we had a vortex ring encounter at about 100 ft on the approach in a MN2

The Russian investigator said ring vortex was not a Russian problem and the official account published in Flight Int had no similarity to our crash

On the pluss side the helo was very solidly built and survived cartwheeling down the strip intact which saved us all

Last edited by Tinribs; 17th Oct 2012 at 09:19.
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Old 17th Oct 2012, 20:55
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Biggest country in the world, some of the most difficult flying in the world, some of the worst equipment in the world. But they still get the job done, and mostly in a very professional way. we are still keeping these cold war opinions, they are nowadays absolutely incorrect and we should look more into our own plates, because not all of it is tasty.
The most sensible post on this thread, thanks Icelanta.

And I reiterate, as a (former) 737 guy operating out of Russia, KZ, UZ and GE for 2 years (2004-2006) I think I have better experience than most.

Take it from me you don't want to know what the consequences would have been.

Edited as I made a mistake with dates (old age..)

Last edited by flash8; 17th Oct 2012 at 20:58.
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Old 18th Oct 2012, 15:33
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Imagine what Eastern European sailors are like....
At 0546 (UTC+1) on 15 February 2011, the feeder container vessel K-Wave (7170 gross tons) ran aground 13 miles east of Malaga on the south Spanish coast, while on passage from Algeciras to Valencia. At the time of the grounding she was proceeding at full speed, and the bridge was unmanned.

http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources...Web_Report.pdf

An extract from the report :
K-Wave steamed almost 50 miles, at full speed and with no one on the bridge, before grounding. While it was unlikely that this was the intended outcome when the party on the bridge started.....
I have just once got drunk with Russians. Four pints of Guinness and a bottle of vodka each. I had a two-day hangover. The Russian "lady" could barely walk the next day as she was still drunk but she drove to work. Next morning the Russian guy appeared to be stone-cold sober and had no hangover - I later found out he drank a bottle of vodka three or four times a week.

Last edited by Wile E. Coyote; 18th Oct 2012 at 16:33.
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Old 18th Oct 2012, 16:31
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At the time of the grounding she was proceeding at full speed, and the bridge was unmanned.
Are you sure of this ?
Usually they put a ( sober ) dog on watch to bark in case of danger

Last edited by jcjeant; 18th Oct 2012 at 16:33.
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Old 18th Oct 2012, 21:13
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I have some nice sentences, to resume, if you have not been in Russia you have not seen anything:

"Welcome to former Soviet Union"
"-25šC OAT, fuel guy, I was former Pilot hunting submarines in Siberia, this is summer, itīs cold when below -40šC, you drink vodka then itīs hot"
"Itīs not my problem"
"itīs not my job"
"Itīs russian standard operation"
"Nasdarovia"
"You my friend, you drunk with me a lot last night"

On the other hand Iīm really impressed on how they designed aircrafts for their country, these guys were really smart, p.e: On the Tu-154 the APU exhaust hits both mail wheels boggies for defrozing
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Old 20th Oct 2012, 13:13
  #33 (permalink)  
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nazdorovie

The easiest way to tell that a person has no idea what he's talking about when he's talking about Russians is the mention of "nazdorovie" (any way you spell it) as a toast. Here's a news flash for you guys: Russians don't use "nazdorovie" ("на здоровье") as a toast. No matter what you've been told in cheap-ass spy novels, movies or TV series.
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Old 20th Oct 2012, 18:10
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The easiest way to tell that a person has no idea what he's talking about when he's talking about Russians is the mention of "nazdorovie" (any way you spell it) as a toast. Here's a news flash for you guys: Russians don't use "nazdorovie" ("на здоровье") as a toast. No matter what you've been told in cheap-ass spy novels, movies or TV series.
Oh, now I get it, you can not get toasts down there in KIAD... sorry mate, next time in ULLI or UUWW.
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Old 20th Oct 2012, 18:16
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In a small African town, a Russian/Ukrainian crew toasted with "for good weathers" or "for safe trip!" before dressing up and heading to their an-26...

Last edited by keitaidenwa; 20th Oct 2012 at 18:17.
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Old 21st Oct 2012, 02:43
  #36 (permalink)  
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Oh, now I get it, you can not get toasts down there in KIAD... sorry mate, next time in ULLI or UUWW.
Huh? What do you think I did just 30 minutes ago — a bit outside the pattern, but still inside the core of the KIAD upside down wedding cake?
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Old 21st Oct 2012, 02:45
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keitaidenwa, was it the same guys who later died from methanol poisoning?
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Old 23rd Oct 2012, 07:42
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Russians don't use "nazdorovie" ("на здоровье") as a toast.

No, they use za zdorovie. nazdorovie (phonetic spelling) is Polish.
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Old 23rd Oct 2012, 13:30
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Not sure why mod deleted my previous post since the thread touches upon culture of Russian/former soviet airlines. This link may also be deleted by mod since it has some offensive scenes in some cultures.

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Old 23rd Oct 2012, 16:14
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Actually it's "na zdrowie" in Polish. There is no "a" or "o" after "d".
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