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One down in the Alps

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One down in the Alps

Old 8th Dec 2020, 22:51
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One down in the Alps

Not my usual forum, but this has just been reported.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...-b1768328.html

one pilot ok from this report, no word on the other 5
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Old 8th Dec 2020, 23:18
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5 dead, 1 survivor

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Old 9th Dec 2020, 02:56
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three helicopters that were deployed could not get close to the crash site because of thick fog
Hope it's not a pointer
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Old 9th Dec 2020, 08:19
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ATN
 
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It was a training flight. The survivor is the chief instructor of the company. Loss of visual references, collision with the ground/obstacles.

Last edited by ATN; 9th Dec 2020 at 08:23. Reason: Adding the cause
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Old 9th Dec 2020, 22:52
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Not familiar with the exact numbers, but 6 POB in a presumably a SAR equipped EC135 with say even 30 mins of usable fuel sounds (a) close to MTOM and (b) not leave much power reserve for 1750m training ops. Be interested to know why necessary or even wise to have so many POB from anyone that knows about those sort of ops.
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Old 10th Dec 2020, 13:56
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I agree, not trying to blame anyone, especially because the cause seems to point to bad weather/ CFIT so unrelated. But in addition to the performance elements you point out, this seems to have been an early EC135 T1 with a winch accessory. Certainly not much of a power reserve on this flight.
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Old 10th Dec 2020, 17:51
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Thanks Frenchrotorhead. It may or may not apply here, but actually being heavy with reduced power reserves certainly increases the risks of operating in poor vis conditions, particularly at low speed - one simply cannot pull out of rapidly developing IMC conditions as quickly. Or gain airspeed as quickly for stable IMC flight, should that be a safe option. Very sad though however it occurred.
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Old 11th Dec 2020, 07:20
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Sorry to hear.

Thoughts are with family and friends.

RIP
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Old 12th Dec 2020, 13:16
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EEW 1700 kg, Useable Fuel 150 Kg, Reserve 70 kg, 6 PAX 480 kg (most of them skinny frech rescuers are more likely at 70 kg) - TOM 2400kg

2400 kg @ 1750 m shouldn't be an issue for T1/P1



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Old 12th Dec 2020, 16:50
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Too heavy to escape .

I agree 100% with you rotorspeed .This kind of training should be done with only minimum crew onboard ,Night time with fog around , no chance to escape any emergency , including engine failure at this altitude.
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Old 12th Dec 2020, 17:16
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Rumors again

Originally Posted by ATN View Post
It was a training flight. The survivor is the chief instructor of the company. Loss of visual references, collision with the ground/obstacles.
ATN :how did you manged to obtain this information regarding this loss of visual references . Is it your own speculation or are you just trying to start a rumor.
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Old 13th Dec 2020, 15:10
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ATN
 
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@aeropierre

The time of the accident, the weather, the local press report, the rescue helicopters returning to base because of thick fog and the fact that I have flown in this area and know that the weather can change very rapidly, all this leads me to conclude that low visibility is the root case. Call it speculation if you like but I am certainly not trying to start a rumor. The survivor, to whom I wish a swift recovery, and maybe a cockpit camera will tell us.
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