Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Rotorheads
Reload this Page >

Wessex lovers?

Rotorheads A haven for helicopter professionals to discuss the things that affect them

Wessex lovers?

Old 9th Oct 2020, 18:31
  #41 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: West Sussex
Age: 80
Posts: 133
Sycamore
My only worry was that someone not using the right gear, and not being familiar with the job, may get hurt. As an ex Wessex chief engineer, I must have done many gearboxes, but the potential for losing fingers is always there.
The 3deg mast tilt means you cannot get a straight lift on the mast, you have to tilt the aircraft at an extreme angle. The S76 is the same, but with a 5deg tilt.
Dave B is offline  
Old 9th Oct 2020, 21:39
  #42 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Hanging off the end of a thread
Posts: 17,940
When you take the gearbox off wasn’t there a couple of cables you had to add to prevent the canopy sagging fwd.
NutLoose is offline  
Old 10th Oct 2020, 15:31
  #43 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: West Sussex
Age: 80
Posts: 133
Not to my knowledge NutLoose, but I never worked on any of the Navy versions, perhaps they had extra gear. Anyone who has read Richard Pikes book helicopter boys, will have read about the Bristow crash in Indonesia. This was an ex Brunei army Mk. 50, and it was jinxed. We spent Two years rebuilding it at Redhill, after which it went to Port Harcourt in Nigeria, after a year or so of good service it turned over due to ground resonance. It was repaired again on site, only to be finally lost after I left due to a tail servo malfunction. As for as I know its still there in he swamp.
Barney Swinton-Bland was flying a Whirlwind in PH, when he had a blade pocket lift, we rescued him as he floated merrily down the river on his pontoons. We dumped the blade, and the next time we flew over we saw that the locals had retrieve it, mounted it no tressles and were using it to cut up fish on. Who say Shell dont care for the environment.
Dave B is offline  
Old 10th Oct 2020, 16:03
  #44 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: east ESSEX
Posts: 3,699
Black `bodge-tape`(long before`speed-tape) was the answer to lifted pockets on WW.....until you flew thru` the next tropical rain shower.....or until the `Glovers` sorted the problem...eventually...
sycamore is online now  
Old 10th Oct 2020, 16:42
  #45 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Location: England
Posts: 104
Do you remember the silver metallic tape that was stuck along the leading edges of Wessex V blades in the Far East to reduce erosion from heavy rain? All that happened was that the rain split the tape and your leading edge had all the aerodynamics of a house brick! And with all the attendant vibration................Happy days
Georg1na is offline  
Old 10th Oct 2020, 16:57
  #46 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 4,983
I'm with sycamore. We always used black tape on our Whirlwinds in Borneo.
Fareastdriver is offline  
Old 11th Oct 2020, 07:47
  #47 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: EGDC
Posts: 8,137
We had clear blade tape in NI in the 80's which often lifted in heavy rain causing the classic 'Wop, Wop' sound.

The tape usually removed itself if you kept flying but on one occasion it didn't and we landed and shut down to discover that one of the blade pockets had removed itself instead!
crab@SAAvn.co.uk is offline  
Old 11th Oct 2020, 09:18
  #48 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 4,983
In Borneo we found that the standard Smith & Wesson .38 and 12 rounds we were issued with was useless. Shooting against a headwind you could see the bullet and if it got more than twenty yards the bullet was so far off target that you victim was fireproof.

You could tear the old black blade tape into very thin strips. One would then wrap them into the groove on the 9 mm cartridge. The enabled you to place them in the chamber of a .38 Smith & Wesson and the tape would act like the rim on the pistol's cartridge.

The difference was fantastic and with the bigger charge six shots into a fuel drum at 50 yards was easy. The only problem was that you had to poke the empty shells out with a screwdriver as the extractor would not grip the tape..

!2 rounds of II WW ammunition or unlimited 9 mm from the Ghurkas? No contest.

Last edited by Fareastdriver; 11th Oct 2020 at 17:49.
Fareastdriver is offline  
Old 12th Oct 2020, 14:11
  #49 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Just over the road from Bicester airfield
Age: 77
Posts: 383
Couple of Wessex with head sling in place, although shouldn't really lift the head with blades attached if I remember correctly ?.
zetec2 is offline  
Old 12th Oct 2020, 14:34
  #50 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 4,983
Looks as if it has just been put on a cradle for transport.
Fareastdriver is offline  
Old 12th Oct 2020, 15:25
  #51 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: east ESSEX
Posts: 3,699
z2, think that might have been a `staff` navigators `landing`...!
sycamore is online now  
Old 12th Oct 2020, 16:05
  #52 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Just over the road from Bicester airfield
Age: 77
Posts: 383
slight bend in rear fuselage through the serial, on a transporter back at Finningley about September 82.
zetec2 is offline  
Old 12th Oct 2020, 16:11
  #53 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: east ESSEX
Posts: 3,699
Z2, think it was at Coltishall it happened.....
sycamore is online now  
Old 14th Oct 2020, 16:20
  #54 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Wallingford
Posts: 22
The sling" shown in the photo is not strictly a head sling but a sling capable of lifting the head and gearbox as a complete unit. It is of all metal construction (probably mild steel) and can be used to lift not only the head and gearbox unit but the compete aircraft! The head (only) sling is a four legged wire rope sling affair of altogether more flimsy construction.

With regard to the query about cockpit wire rope cables, they should be fitted to support the cockpit rear bulkhead when the longerons either side of the main gearbox are to be removed prior to lifting the gearbox. They fit between the lower forward corner of the sliding window rail and the top rear corner of the sloping bulkhead.

Incidentally the aircraft does not have to be tilted to remove/refit a main gearbox. A couple of strong guys pulling rearwards on the gearbox A frames as the gearbox is lifted/lowered will allow the front A frame legs to "clear" the base of the cockpit bulkhead.
racingrigger is offline  
Old 21st Oct 2020, 12:19
  #55 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: West Sussex
Age: 80
Posts: 133

Hill top Jambo 1965
Far East Driver, does this bring back any memories.

Dave B is offline  
Old 21st Oct 2020, 13:36
  #56 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: east ESSEX
Posts: 3,699
Gotta date Dave...? 225 Sdn `D`,until Nov`65 then 103 Sdn....
sycamore is online now  
Old 21st Oct 2020, 15:42
  #57 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: West Sussex
Age: 80
Posts: 133
Sorry Sycamore I was never very good at keeping diaries, but this would have been Summer 1965, after the New Zealand Regiment took over the area, from the Gurkhas, I was in charge of maintenance at Simanggang. Your right about it being 225, and shortly before Sam Smiths accident, operating from Kuching.
Dave B is offline  
Old 21st Oct 2020, 18:51
  #58 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: east ESSEX
Posts: 3,699
Don`t know if you were on this ..? Your Eng.O is 2nd left ,seated...possibly Oct`65
Attached Files
File Type: pdf
225 Sqdn ,Kuching[1642].pdf (404.7 KB, 23 views)
sycamore is online now  
Old 21st Oct 2020, 20:53
  #59 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Hanging off the end of a thread
Posts: 17,940
Originally Posted by racingrigger View Post
With regard to the query about cockpit wire rope cables, they should be fitted to support the cockpit rear bulkhead when the longerons either side of the main gearbox are to be removed prior to lifting the gearbox. They fit between the lower forward corner of the sliding window rail and the top rear corner of the sloping bulkhead.
Thanks, glad I’m not going mad and remember them even as a sooty, I even remember on the HC2 you need to put the v strut back in before removing the second engine, I saw one that they didn’t and the nose sagged, it was fixed by putting an aircraft jack on the angled eng bay decking and jacking it back up to slot one back in.
NutLoose is offline  
Old 22nd Oct 2020, 09:46
  #60 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 4,983
Far East Driver, does this bring back any memories.
Not really. I was up north in Sabah, well away from the fleshpots of Kuching. XP330 was handed over to us when we left Labuan and it then served on 230 Sqn.
Fareastdriver is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.