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Leonardo TH-73 US Navy

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Leonardo TH-73 US Navy

Old 13th Jan 2020, 23:15
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Leonardo TH-73A US Navy Advance Helicopter Training

Congratulations to Leonardo as Us Navy selects the AW119Ke as the new US Navy Advance Helicopter Training System replacing the legacy Bell TH-57C Sea Ranger.

https://www.navair.navy.mil/news/Nav...-01132020-1723From Program Executive Office Tactical Aircraft Programs Public Affairs

NAVAL AIR SYSTEMS COMMAND, PATUXENT RIVER, Md. (NNS) -- The U.S. Navy announced on Jan. 13, 2020 that AgustaWestland Philadelphia Corporation (Leonardo) was awarded a contract for $176.5M for the production of 32 TH-73A helicopters in support of the Advanced Helicopter Training System (AHTS) program.

“Today marks a great team effort to procure and deliver a helicopter trainer for the next generation of helicopter and tilt-rotor pilots for the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard,” said James F. Geurts, assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition. “I’m proud of the aggressive work the team did to leverage the commercial industrial base to get this capability to the warfighters, and our nation, at the best value to the taxpayer. This effort is key to ensure the readiness of our Naval Aviators for decades to come.”

Five proposals were submitted for the contract. The new firm fixed price TH-73A contract was awarded on a best-value tradeoff basis with a base and three one-year options. The base year contract is for $176.5M for 32 aircraft. The total contract value is $648.1M for the procurement of 130 aircraft. Helicopter deliveries are scheduled to begin in calendar year 2020 and continue through calendar year 2024.

The new helicopter will meet advanced rotary wing and intermediate tilt-rotor training requirements for the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard through 2050. The TH-73A will be manufactured in United States with assembly taking place, through FAA Airworthiness certification, in the contractor’s FAA Part 21 facility in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Last edited by chopper2004; 14th Jan 2020 at 01:28.
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 11:41
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A wonder what they will name it? Koala may be un-bearable...
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 14:01
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The new helicopter will meet advanced rotary wing and intermediate tilt-rotor training requirements for the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard through 2050.
How does that work?
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 14:57
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Is the ‘intermediate section’ of tilt-rotor training teaching fixed-wing pilots how to hover?
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 14:58
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Originally Posted by Lurching View Post
How does that work?
The DoD NAVY buys 130 helicopters, trains the instructors and the instructors train the students.
The whole package is turnkey and includes FSTDs.
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 15:00
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Originally Posted by Bravo73 View Post
Is the ‘intermediate section’ of tilt-rotor training teaching fixed-wing pilots how to hover?
Have to start somewhere, however it's easier to make a hybrid pilot out of a helicopter pilot rather than from a fixed wing one.
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Old 14th Jan 2020, 18:39
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Originally Posted by rrekn View Post
A wonder what they will name it? Koala may be un-bearable...
Marsupial?
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Old 15th Jan 2020, 00:50
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Originally Posted by Self loading bear View Post
Marsupial?
Yes it is.
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Old 15th Jan 2020, 04:08
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Drop-bear perhaps?


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Old 15th Jan 2020, 13:25
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Originally Posted by tottigol View Post
The DoD NAVY buys 130 helicopters, trains the instructors and the instructors train the students.
The whole package is turnkey and includes FSTDs.
The FSTDs are actually part of a separate bid. The provider for the training services has yet to be determined.
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Old 15th Jan 2020, 18:29
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Originally Posted by rrekn View Post
A wonder what they will name it? Koala may be un-bearable...
That would be a Sea Koala, then..
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Old 15th Jan 2020, 21:10
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Does anybody know what autopilot Leonardo stuffed into the 119 to get it IFR. Is it the old analog SHZ-109A or SP-711?
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Old 15th Jan 2020, 22:55
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Originally Posted by S76Heavy View Post
That would be a Sea Koala, then..
So a she-bear?

or (as it is no bear) a cloaca?
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Old 16th Jan 2020, 15:32
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Originally Posted by SimFlightTest View Post
Does anybody know what autopilot Leonardo stuffed into the 119 to get it IFR. Is it the old analog SHZ-109A or SP-711?
It's the Genesys avionics system. https://www.advancedhelicoptertraine...trum-training/
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Old 18th Jan 2020, 23:49
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Originally Posted by Self loading bear View Post
So a she-bear?

or (as it is no bear) a cloaca?
We prefer to use cloaca for all Airbus products.
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Old 20th Jan 2020, 02:40
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Autopilot

The avionics (displays) are from Genesys. The only autopilot they (Genesys) has that is certified for IFR is the one used for the EC145e IFR certification with Metro Aviation using Genyses displays. I believe the autopilot used (and I could be wrong) for the Navy contract is the same one used for the 109 Trekker (don't have the model number) ...which also uses the same Genesys displays.
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Old 25th Jan 2020, 20:59
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the helicopter may be un-kaola-fied for the program after all.
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Old 25th Jan 2020, 21:02
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I was wondering what about the AW119 made it the choice? in what regards did it outduel the H135 and the bell 407? I suspect the open cabin forward-facing bench seat arrangement had something to do with it, as the 407 has the first pair of passanger seats facing rear. What else may have come into play in favor of the AW119?
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Old 26th Jan 2020, 03:45
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Originally Posted by Copter Appreciator00 View Post
I was wondering what about the AW119 made it the choice? in what regards did it outduel the H135 and the bell 407? I suspect the open cabin forward-facing bench seat arrangement had something to do with it, as the 407 has the first pair of passanger seats facing rear. What else may have come into play in favor of the AW119?
SPIFR single engine with a PT6, decent cabin, good performance, cost effective.

Personal opinion, I think it was a wise choice.
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Old 27th Jan 2020, 00:23
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Originally Posted by Copter Appreciator00 View Post
I was wondering what about the AW119 made it the choice? in what regards did it outduel the H135 and the bell 407? I suspect the open cabin forward-facing bench seat arrangement had something to do with it, as the 407 has the first pair of passanger seats facing rear. What else may have come into play in favor of the AW119?
The EC135 has won many similar training contracts (UK, Germany, Australia) due to the fact it's a twin, but that also brings increased costs (and complexities for a student pilot), I think the combination of IFR capability combined with the low running costs of a single won the day.

Like all US Defense contracts, I'm sure there was a senator or congressman from Philadelphia that had something to do with it too...
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