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How would a new student fare in a helicopter if the instructor is kaput?

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How would a new student fare in a helicopter if the instructor is kaput?

Old 4th Sep 2019, 07:39
  #21 (permalink)  

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The big difference is that EXDAC already admitted that he had a lot of flying experience in other types. If he had none he would have found it a lot more difficult to fly a helicopter.

Having flown gliders, on his second trip he could have been carrying out long range search and rescue missions...
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 09:42
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ShyTorque View Post
The big difference is that EXDAC already admitted that he had a lot of flying experience in other types. If he had none he would have found it a lot more difficult to fly a helicopter.

Having flown gliders, on his second trip he could have been carrying out long range search and rescue missions...
Nah, that's child's play - I think he could have joined the 160th SOAR
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 11:25
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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When I was a kid and not yet growed up, I saw an Elvis movie where he explained to a little girl how to fly helicopters.
"If you can rub your tummy, tap your head, and poke your tongue out at the same time then you can fly a helicopter"

So I tried it and found out I was pretty good at it.

Anyone who has flown a C152 on a calm day would know that the less you interfere with the controls the smoother it flies. With a helicopter if you stop rubbing your tummy or stop tapping your head or stop poking your tongue out then it all quickly goes to pooh.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 14:04
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by cattletruck View Post
When I was a kid and not yet growed up, I saw an Elvis movie where he explained to a little girl how to fly helicopters.
"If you can rub your tummy, tap your head, and poke your tongue out at the same time then you can fly a helicopter"
We were always told that if you can wipe your backside and shave at the same time you will be ace
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 15:30
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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And similarly, if you mix things up it can get very messy.
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 15:46
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Originally Posted by Robbo Jock View Post
And similarly, if you mix things up it can get very messy.
plank drivers just wouldn’t get the metaphor.
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 23:39
  #27 (permalink)  
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A similar thing happened to me on my first rotary familiarization flight, and although I made a bit of a hash of the IMC partial panel NDB approach, I did nail the quickstop.
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Old 6th Sep 2019, 04:52
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Experienced R/C helicopter pilots can fly a real one straight up.

Seen it a few times. Piece of cake.
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Old 6th Sep 2019, 06:02
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Experienced R/C helicopter pilots can fly a real one straight up.
I landed a Learjet on the Enterprise first time I tried it.
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Old 6th Sep 2019, 06:53
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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As an experienced professional fw pilot I had an Aviation mid life crisis and finally gained a ppl/h after 7 years albeit very part time. My first flight with a bit of hovering thrown in was a humiliating exposure to my lack of inate ability. The whole of Yorkshire would barely have contained the wild gyrations that were my initial attempts at hovering. I call bs on any immodest declarations of not having any issues with seat of the pants heli flying. I realised after awhile that an understanding of rotary physics was important which one probably does not have at the beginning. A lack of self deprecation in pilot world is also and generally an invitation to that fickle mistress, karma.
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Old 6th Sep 2019, 12:04
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Even funnier AC it was a Bell 206 that you had flown for quite a bit!

He was warned that he wasn’t allowed to try and hover it upside down like his R/C version.
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 05:09
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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40 years ago, as a fixed wing pilot, I had the opportunity to fly a Bell 204 - Very stable and with a bit of coaching was able to land it OK. Take-offs were not all that hard.

A couple of weeks later, I had the chance to fly a Bell 206 Jet Ranger. I had no chance. I just don't think it's possible to successfully fly something that sensitive without some training.

I could not believe how different the 2 helicopters were.
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 16:24
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by tartare View Post
Even understanding the theory of how the damn things fly, as a fixed wing driver I found my first hands on flight in an R-22 a real handful.
Straight and level forward flight fine.
Turning - amazing how just an imperceptible of the cyclic started the movement.
But hovering - jaysus.
Within 10 seconds I was in PIO, too high and outside the box on the ground.
Very humbling...
I had exactly the same experience. Then, after we landed the instructor said the it would take about 10 hours before I could hover. I thought he was talking rubbish, I mean I had flown an Auater so I could use my feet. In fact it took me just about 10 hours before I could hover.
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Old 8th Sep 2019, 19:22
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Possible

Got bored during a paragliding course in Auckland so turned up for an hours lesson in a jet ranger and my first chopper flight. Briefing..have mates who are fast jet pilots..you won't be able to hover it on your first flight and if you've heard something different it's horlicks.
Given it in cruise..felt really wierd with its oscillation and slow speed ..got bored so flew back to airfield..descended then into low hover and to mess me up got me to fly backwards..novel ..he then got really p!ssed so took it back to the pad. Think he thought it was a set up but I was very current on glider aerobatics and had briefly flown model helicopters with just a tail gyro which was far more difficult than full size.
hover helped by a 10 knot wind down the runway.
Remember a story by my VC10 instructor jumping into the seat on a Trident 1 at prestwick and flying several circuits using his own throttles including manual thrust which wasn't allowed in 70s BEA..didnt believe him at the time as wet behind the ears.
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 06:33
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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I can feel myself rising again....

Maybe we'll be treated to a talent show-down between EXDAC and blind pew, a p1$$1ng contest of the best of the best!

We are all humbled by your tales of your unbelievable skills!
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 11:46
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Skills

Actually there are many many extremely skilled pilots out there. My most demanding wasn't doing split ar$e cloud break 14 visual left hand circuit 28 with final turn completed at 400ft and landing config by 300ft in foehn turbulence MD80 but tugging in a Raylle previously flown by Bleriot at a French mountain site. Observing harmonic limitations on a lycoming. Drop cable below 50ft..left 35 degree turn..pull up to 200ft..roll right..slats ..flaps..side slipping right turn....bank off..throttle closed ..kick off drift..flare..keep nose wheel airborne due nose wheel shimmy..neutralise trims ( to keep straight).. and there were several amateurs who could do it with more grace and less sweat than moi.
don't criticise it till you try it
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Old 9th Sep 2019, 11:59
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by pilotmike View Post
We are all humbled by your tales of your unbelievable skills!
I am always reassured by the comment my instructor made right at the start, 'some people seem to be naturals and pick it up very quickly - but that can lead to problems later on'. It made me feel better when it quickly became apparent that I was not a natural!
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Old 12th Sep 2019, 17:14
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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It has been done, but not by your average Joe in an R22.

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=...page&q&f=false
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