Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Rotorheads
Reload this Page >

New Cabri G2 helicopter crash - 2 persons injured

Rotorheads A haven for helicopter professionals to discuss the things that affect them

New Cabri G2 helicopter crash - 2 persons injured

Old 31st Jan 2019, 23:03
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: Approximately here
Posts: 7
New Cabri G2 helicopter crash - 2 persons injured

A French newspaper reported a crash in the south part of the French alps, more precisely in Luberon.

It's mentioned that 2 people were in the helicopter. It has been reported that the aircraft was slightly spinning, and the 60 years old pilot was experienced and relatively injured while his wife was slightly injured.

Cabri G2 - SN 1170 - F-HRCR
Source: Helis.com

Last edited by BDS29; 1st Feb 2019 at 08:47.
BDS29 is offline  
Old 2nd Feb 2019, 17:50
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Africa
Posts: 318
Angel Cabri G2

This little aircraft certainly does a good job in keeping its pax alive


From the BEA Twitter account

Hot and Hi is offline  
Old 3rd Feb 2019, 04:14
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 297
It looks similar to a previous Cabri G2 accident, where the helicopter fuselage has slid off the skid landing gear. Maybe it's just my view, by looking at the pictures.
Kulwin Park is offline  
Old 3rd Feb 2019, 06:14
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Africa
Posts: 318
Previous Cabri accident

Originally Posted by Kulwin Park View Post
It looks similar to a previous Cabri G2 accident, where the helicopter fuselage has slid off the skid landing gear. Maybe it's just my view, by looking at the pictures.
Which accident exactly? Has it been discussed here on PPRuNe? (Can you provide a link to that post?)

Would you see this as a fault, or safety feature?
Hot and Hi is offline  
Old 3rd Feb 2019, 06:34
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Great South East, tired and retired
Posts: 2,436
It does look like a single attachment point on each crosstube, wonder why they did that?
Ascend Charlie is offline  
Old 3rd Feb 2019, 07:06
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Africa
Posts: 318
Guimbal Cabri G2 thread

Maybe the OP can request this thread to be merged with the land-standing Guimbal Cabri G2 discussion here?
Hot and Hi is offline  
Old 3rd Feb 2019, 08:18
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: UK
Posts: 564
I think Kulwin Park is referring to this one:

Cabri crash at John Wayne Airport Sept 2018
GS-Alpha is offline  
Old 3rd Feb 2019, 12:16
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Australia
Posts: 297
Originally Posted by GS-Alpha View Post
I think Kulwin Park is referring to this one:

Cabri crash at John Wayne Airport Sept 2018
THAT'S THE ONE - THANKS.
Kulwin Park is offline  
Old 3rd Feb 2019, 16:22
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: California
Posts: 187
Originally Posted by Hot and Hi View Post
This little aircraft certainly does a good job in keeping its pax alive


From the BEA Twitter account

Good thing 'cause they don't seem to be doing a great job at staying in the air!
Robbiee is offline  
Old 3rd Feb 2019, 17:49
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: In the air with luck
Posts: 993
Pot Kettle black
500e is offline  
Old 4th Feb 2019, 12:39
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: UK
Posts: 455
There do seem to have been rather a lot of G2 accidents in its ralatively short life. I appreciate that it is a purpose-built trainer so the risk factor is high, however to me, without having done any sort of in depth study, it seems a bit accident prone. This is a shame, as it is my machine of choice when I retire from full time 'paid' flying.

Does anyone have any accident stats in terms of accidents per 100,000 flying hours? Have there yet been any fatal accidents? It would be interesting to know.

JJ
jellycopter is offline  
Old 4th Feb 2019, 13:50
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Africa
Posts: 318
Only 1 fatal accident - the midair collision that happened last year in the U.K.

Last edited by Hot and Hi; 4th Feb 2019 at 14:17. Reason: corrected country of accident.
Hot and Hi is offline  
Old 4th Feb 2019, 14:00
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: N52.7 W2.04
Posts: 59
Originally Posted by Hot and Hi View Post
Only 1 fatal accident - the midair collision that happened last year in the U.S.
Are you sure you are not recalling the fatal mid-air that happened here in the UK? Or has there been two mid-air collisions with the G2?
tqmatch is offline  
Old 4th Feb 2019, 14:15
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Africa
Posts: 318
Originally Posted by tqmatch View Post
Are you sure you are not recalling the fatal mid-air that happened here in the UK? Or has there been two mid-air collisions with the G2?
Sorry yes, it was U.K. on 17.11.18. A Cessna 152 (G-WACG) and a Guimbal Cabri G-2 (G-JAMM) crashed following a mid-air collision near Aylesbury, England. Both occupants of the Cessna and both occupants of the Cabri helicopter, pilot and student, suffered fatal injuries.

I shall correct my post above. The basic message was that there were no GUIMBAL fatalities that could be linked in any way to the way it flies.
Hot and Hi is offline  
Old 4th Feb 2019, 16:30
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: N52.7 W2.04
Posts: 59
Does anyone know how the BC Helicopters G2 which crashed during auto's training last November got on in relation to staying on top of its skids? From the write ups I have read, directional control was lost due to low NR and therefore low TR Speed making the fenestron ineffective, so if there were going to be forces to present to topple off of the skid cross tubes surely this would have been a "good" accident example to look at?
tqmatch is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2019, 02:06
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Montreal
Posts: 575
Look here, another picture a few posts down. G2 thread

Nothing magic about the G2, as it fills in more of the R22 role, you’ll see proportionally more accidents. From the report:
Date Entered:
2019-01-25
Narrative:
Update TSB Report #A18P0169: C-GELP, a Helicopteres Guimbal Cabri G2 aircraft operated by British Columbia Helicopters, was conducting an autorotation training flight within the infield at Abbotsford (CYXX), BC with 1 instructor and 1 student on board. During the descent into the wind, the main rotor RPM decreased lower than anticipated. The Fenestron tail rotor became inefficient, and directional control was lost. As directional control was re-established in close proximity to the ground, the wind direction shifted, the helicopter skid tube contacted the ground and the helicopter rolled over. The instructor and the student exited the helicopter with minor injuries. The helicopter sustained substantial damage. The wind velocity at the time of the accident was 18 knots, gusting to 28 knots. There was no post impact fire.

Last edited by malabo; 5th Feb 2019 at 02:35.
malabo is offline  
Old 5th Feb 2019, 20:02
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: UK
Posts: 88
Originally Posted by Kulwin Park View Post
It looks similar to a previous Cabri G2 accident, where the helicopter fuselage has slid off the skid landing gear. Maybe it's just my view, by looking at the pictures.
That's their design.
They all do that when there's a lateral impact.

https://resources.stuff.co.nz/conten...3560179344.jpg
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune....be0a4d9f21.jpg


Originally Posted by Ascend Charlie View Post
It does look like a single attachment point on each crosstube, wonder why they did that?
There's multiple points.
To allow it to slide in a lateral impact.
In all cases where it's happened, the side of the cabin is on the floor. The cabin is usually always parallel to the floor.
Easier egress? Stabilises the wreck after a crash to prevent further flipping or spinning? I don't know.

Best guess is absorbing the energy of the crash.
The rate of left rotation is unknown, but markings on the ground indicate that there was a single impact and that the helicopter struck and rolled in place, with the rear portion of the landing gear embedded in the ground. The linear and angular momentum was absorbed by the landing gear, spreading the skids, with additional energy absorbed by the fuselage sliding across the skid tubes.
https://www.caa.govt.nz/assets/legac...rts/ZK-IMZ.pdf
WillyPete is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2019, 14:30
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: EGDC
Posts: 7,437
Surely it would be better to just design the skids to splay progressively on impact keeping the fuselage upright and preventing the rotors impacting the ground which is always going to be expensive to repair.
crab@SAAvn.co.uk is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2019, 15:25
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: UK
Posts: 455
Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
Surely it would be better to just design the skids to splay progressively on impact keeping the fuselage upright and preventing the rotors impacting the ground which is always going to be expensive to repair.
Unless you're in the market for selling spare parts of course!
jellycopter is offline  
Old 6th Feb 2019, 16:09
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: shropshire
Age: 69
Posts: 18
very droll!!!
helirobin is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.