Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Rotorheads
Reload this Page >

Royal Navy Rescue

Rotorheads A haven for helicopter professionals to discuss the things that affect them

Royal Navy Rescue

Old 22nd Sep 2017, 13:20
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Florida
Age: 50
Posts: 418
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Royal Navy Rescue

Not quite sure why they'd be sailing around in a hurricane, but there we go.

Dramatic rescue from capsized ship during Hurricane Maria | Daily Mail Online

Last edited by vaqueroaero; 22nd Sep 2017 at 14:35.
vaqueroaero is offline  
Old 22nd Sep 2017, 13:29
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 3,680
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Noticeably, when the camera panned out, the ship was resting 50yds offshore in shallow surf.
Bit of a publicity stunt if you ask me.
The locals accidentally pressed the 999 icon on their phones rather than the UBER one !!!
Atleast it's dinner conversation for the battle hardened crew to talk over.
Thomas coupling is offline  
Old 22nd Sep 2017, 14:14
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Somewhere nice
Age: 51
Posts: 210
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Read the article !

No publicity stunt I believe.

"It later emerged that the British man, who has not been named, had been unable to escape the shipwreck and died before emergency crews were able to stage the rescue, which was captured on camera on Thursday by Petty Officer 2nd Class Ashley Johnson.

The family, on board a 146ft former oceanographic research vessel called the Ferrel, had spent a terrifying 24 hours with the engine disabled and sent out an SOS call at 11.30am on Wednesday."

BZ Ma'am for a good rescue.
rugmuncher is offline  
Old 22nd Sep 2017, 14:41
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 3,680
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Rugmuncher - joke re the PR stunt.

BZ for good rescue???
The upturned vessel was rock steady. Max wind speed was 30kts as seen in the video. Sea state in those shallows was about 4. Text book pick up.
BZ for what?
Thomas coupling is offline  
Old 22nd Sep 2017, 21:19
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Yeovil, England
Posts: 22
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Agree with TC, looks like a relatively easy training serial, however, as we appear to be considering awarding medals to people in airconditioned offices dropping bombs from drones thosands of miles away, perhaps a BZ for actually being there is not out of place
goffered again is offline  
Old 22nd Sep 2017, 21:55
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: EGDC
Posts: 9,662
Received 108 Likes on 51 Posts
I'm sure someone in the RN will write them up for a medal.

Not sure why they bothered winching - much safer for all involved to land on next to them.

Cue some outcry about how SAR is RN secondary role etc etc etc
crab@SAAvn.co.uk is offline  
Old 22nd Sep 2017, 23:10
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Thaïland
Age: 65
Posts: 183
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
How the family was arrived on on the " top " of a big capsized boat close to the shore ? Their boat ?
BOBAKAT is offline  
Old 23rd Sep 2017, 21:24
  #8 (permalink)  
FD2
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Elsewhere
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Pavlov got his dogs to drool at the mere sound of a bell. Any mention of RN SAR now produces a similarly excited reaction from Crab. Still smarting from earlier encounters old chap? Still feel you have an axe to grind? Agree with TC about the 'risks' in this rescue though.
FD2 is offline  
Old 23rd Sep 2017, 22:25
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: SW
Posts: 208
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Safer to land on the hull of an upturned boat rather than a short winch with oodles of wind? Really crab? Slope/movement/c of g risk?


Was reported that it was their boat, with skipper/dad/husband dead trapped inside sadly.
switch_on_lofty is offline  
Old 24th Sep 2017, 10:56
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: EGDC
Posts: 9,662
Received 108 Likes on 51 Posts
The only Pavlovian response has been from the dark blue brigade inevitably

Lofty, you don't have to put the full weight of the aircraft on the hull - don't the RN practice light wheel contact hover/landing?

From my experiences with non-mainstream RN SAR, winching is the more risky of the two options.
crab@SAAvn.co.uk is offline  
Old 24th Sep 2017, 11:21
  #11 (permalink)  
FD2
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Elsewhere
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Ding! Ding! Fetch the mop Mrs Crab! One comment, possibly from 'dark blue', but constructive and the other highlighting your little obsession. Not quite the response you were hoping for with the deliberately goading 'medals' remark was it?

It wasn't a particularly risky rescue, I agree, but no doubt you would have handled it much more skilfully. There's really no need to argue the toss every time!
FD2 is offline  
Old 24th Sep 2017, 11:40
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: EGDC
Posts: 9,662
Received 108 Likes on 51 Posts
Perhaps you haven't noticed but RN SAR doesn't exist any more
crab@SAAvn.co.uk is offline  
Old 24th Sep 2017, 21:26
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 3,680
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
What happened here then? An RN cab searched for and rescued some people off a boat?
As long as the RN has helo's and a winch - it's SAR.. A secondary role it always was and always will be. It's always been run of the mill - nothing more and nothing less.

Only the RAF can make a mountain out of a mole hill. Squadrons, hundreds of people, dozens of senior officers and dedicated primary tasking. I never could work out how you slipped it past the accountants for so long!!
Thomas coupling is offline  
Old 24th Sep 2017, 22:41
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: EGDC
Posts: 9,662
Received 108 Likes on 51 Posts
That rather denies the many valiant efforts of 771 and Gannet - I'm pretty sure they recognised the difference between SAR being a primary role and secondary one.
crab@SAAvn.co.uk is offline  
Old 25th Sep 2017, 20:40
  #15 (permalink)  
FD2
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Elsewhere
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Crab

Woof! Woof! Just drop that bone, there's a good boy! Mop again Mrs Crab!

I think TC is referring to when the RN is at sea. None of us would deny the outstanding work done by 771, 772, 819/719 and station flights around the country until the 'peace dividend' wiped them all out. SAR was, of course, their primary role but you couldn't say that RN helos at sea have a primary SAR role apart from the ships' flights in the old fixed wing carriers. That's why RN helos are equipped with sonobuoys, torpedoes, missiles, depth charges etc.
FD2 is offline  
Old 25th Sep 2017, 22:06
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Among these dark Satanic mills
Posts: 1,195
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Only the RAF can make a mountain out of a mole hill. Squadrons, hundreds of people, dozens of senior officers and dedicated primary tasking. I never could work out how you slipped it past the accountants for so long!!
Funny then that Bristow appear to have dedicated aircraft and crews for SAR rather than just using guys and girls from the offshore roster
TorqueOfTheDevil is offline  
Old 25th Sep 2017, 22:07
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Wales
Posts: 464
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
That's why RN helos are equipped with sonobuoys, torpedoes, missiles, depth charges etc.
oh, they managed to kill a few survivors over the years without any of that stuff FD2!

coat,hat
Al-bert is offline  
Old 25th Sep 2017, 22:41
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: EGDC
Posts: 9,662
Received 108 Likes on 51 Posts
One only has to read a few DASORs to see how effective secondary role SAR is in the RN
crab@SAAvn.co.uk is offline  
Old 25th Sep 2017, 23:40
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: UK
Age: 78
Posts: 201
Likes: 0
Received 8 Likes on 1 Post
I set Crab's posts - along with those of Anfi and Krystal n Chips - to 'Ignore' not long after signing up here. However as my long time mate FD2 had posted I 'un-ignored' Crab today. Wish I hadn't bothered - same old puerile anti-RN stuff. Back to 'Ignore' with you, Crab old boy. Don't bother replying - won't see it.
Democritus is offline  
Old 26th Sep 2017, 03:42
  #20 (permalink)  
FD2
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Elsewhere
Posts: 56
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Albert

Your post is rather nasty and puerile. Perhaps you can supply some instances of the RN 'killing survivors', for our enlightenment?

I was pointing out that the helicopters are equipped with that sort of weaponry to fulfil their various roles at sea, for which the crews are adequately trained. Some of the helicopters are rather simple machines like those the RAF fly (apart from the late Sea King) because they are designed to carry troops from A to B and back but may have a big noisy gun mounted in the cabin door. The Chinook is very complicated as a machine but still fulfils that role.

If someone is in distress at sea then there is a legal obligation to go and help but those crews are not specifically trained in SAR techniques, which Crab and perhaps you are? There is not really a role for them to do that, it's just what they'll do if they are able to help. Of course there will be accidents from time to time but flying's never an entirely safe endeavour, no matter how many rules, regs and SOPs over-keen people can come up with, is it?


Crab

Get a life! You're like a dog, just waiting for that bell. Was your mother abandoned by a horrid, hairy matelot when you were a kid?

I dare say that if a frontline RAF crew (not a SAR crew of course, back in the day) was picked at random to go and do a complicated and difficult SAR task there might also be the occasional problem. Ah, but come to think of it they could no doubt refuse the task, couldn't they? Rules and regulations eh? At sea there is no one else who might be able to do it - it's all down to you personally. In the past some accidents have happened because it was and is very difficult to refuse your captain at sea, even when conditions were/are below minimums and some people have been over-eager and exceeded their capabilities but it's mainly because when people are dying in front of you it's difficult to do nothing, isn't it? My conscience wouldn't allow it.

Instead of continuing the childish inter-service sniping, you might acknowledge that there are many people alive today (with grateful families) who have been plucked off sinking ships, oil rigs etc all around the World by Royal Navy crews (e.g. Steel Vendor), just as there are many likewise who were rescued by the Royal Air Force (e.g. Finneagle) around our coasts. Some good friends of mine were in the RAF and we used to enjoy the odd bit of inter-service banter but yours has just become boring and tedious and your 'arguments' evasive and circuitous. Having the last word isn't always so clever, even if you think that defending 'your' service is the right thing to do, come hell or high water.

Out.

Last edited by FD2; 26th Sep 2017 at 04:20. Reason: speling corecshun and gramma
FD2 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.