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Best Takeoff and landing procedures from oilrigs

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Best Takeoff and landing procedures from oilrigs

Old 9th Aug 2015, 19:04
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Best Takeoff and landing procedures from oilrigs

I'd like to open a discussion on what in your opinion would be the best and preferred procedures for taking off and landing to/from oilrig decks (including moveable decks) considering the various type of environment and possible weather conditions.

It would be appreciated also what are the considerations taken into account for passenger comfort and safety issues, particularly regarding the presence of obstacles and various types os warm air sources.

Thanks
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Old 9th Aug 2015, 19:28
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I would recommend using the manufacturers profiles for this type of thing. In this world of litigation, if you do it like they say, you always have a claim when something goes wrong.
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Old 9th Aug 2015, 20:19
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I would recommend using the manufacturers profiles for this type of thing. In this world of litigation, if you do it like they say, you always have a claim when something goes wrong.
The manufacturers generally don't know anything about real world operations to offshore installations.

Do what you operator tells you. Follow your OMA/OMB in EASA land. The operator will have sanitised or improved on whatever OEM advice is out there.
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Old 9th Aug 2015, 20:29
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VL that's a tadge harsh, at least one manufacturer I know has a number of flying staff with a bit of offshore experience! We are trying to keep up!

DB
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Old 9th Aug 2015, 20:34
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I did say "generally". Out of the 1000s employed, there are a 'few' in each OEM that have some offshore experience. However those that develop RFM procedures are test pilots that come straight out of the military.
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Old 9th Aug 2015, 21:08
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Representing SLF in a professional capacity I usually.....
Get in the back, strap in tight and pray to whatever God you believe in that the guys up front know what their doing !
35 years experience shows a large variable range in competency apart from their ability to induce severe pucker factor amongst the troops.
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Old 9th Aug 2015, 22:15
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Landing - Make sure it is the right deck and don't hit anything. Try and get vaguely in the yellow circle.

Takeoff - Point the sharp end in a clear direction, pull power, count to two and if nothing goes "bang" (unless it's a Makila in which case you can ignore the bangs) nose down 10 degrees and hold it until the ASI starts moving, nose up slightly and relax.

That's about it
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Old 10th Aug 2015, 02:47
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hilarious response there roundwego I see this going to at least 5 pages of opinions.
The present approach into the wind SOP at all times vs the old deck orientation, accept the xwind and land debate drives me bonkers.
I have seen guys approaching "into the wind" when you would have to fly through the derrick when the wind was 1 gusting 3.
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Old 10th Aug 2015, 04:14
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I like where you're going with this, Roundwego.

But could you dumb it down a bit more for us antipodeans, please?
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Old 10th Aug 2015, 06:03
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Wink Take off procedure

Try this take off procedure if you dare .... 1986 offshore Brazil crew change flight departing drillship helideck.
10 pax mount up and doors closed
Pilot pulls lever up until torque gauge needle moves right round into the red
Pilot lowers lever and by sign language asks 1 pax to leave
Pilot pulls lever up again and torque gauge needle sits firmly in the red
Pilot "beeps" up engine RPM and helicopter still remains stuck to the deck
Pilot lowers lever and asks another pax to leave ( by now there is no need to ask for volunteers!)

Pilot raises lever and hey presto we are off the deck (just) and shuddering into translational lift.

Did wonder if he had read the book on weight & balance & required power etc ?
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Old 10th Aug 2015, 08:32
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It must have been an S76A(+?). Simple technique at 30 degrees plus. Beep up to 105%, throw the lever at the roof; when airborne throw it over the side of the deck and use the 150 ft. or so before the sea to get some airspeed.
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Old 10th Aug 2015, 10:47
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S76A nope it was a 2 bladed Bell probably a 212 or 214 as I remember it but it was a long time ago and I'm sure nobody would behave like that nowadays ?

Anyway obviously a top driver because we all survived.
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Old 10th Aug 2015, 12:04
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Just to put meat on my earlier post, of course you use your operators methods. I thought he WAS something to do with an operator asking for advice on what to tell his pilots. Manufacturers are pretty good on handling advice these days........ Lawyers have forced that
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Old 10th Aug 2015, 14:47
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You seem to be taking a lot of flak here.

Offshore take-off and landing criteria in twins is fairly specific and documented.

The procedure is a one-of-a-kind and is considered standard in the industry.

It pains me to see here the replies you have been given to your request and from one of the most professional forums on the net.

PM me for more specific and legit info on the procedures. I'll be glad to help you out.
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Old 11th Aug 2015, 06:41
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@ roundwego;

That pretty much sums up the recommendation.
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Old 11th Aug 2015, 07:11
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Manufacturers are pretty good on handling advice these days........ Lawyers have forced that
Really? Here's the elevated helipad landing profile recommended by Sikorsky. Thankfully I'm not aware of any operator that follows it!

The approach is flown at an airspeed of 40 KIAS
with a descent rate of no more than 600 feet per minute. At
an altitude of 50 feet above the landing surface, the aircraft
is flared to reduce airspeed and descent rate. During this
flare, the pilot should maneuver the aircraft over the landing
pad.

Pilots should follow their operator's procedures - end of!
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Old 11th Aug 2015, 07:23
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Question

Hey Bladegrabber....& what is wrong with that technique to prove You have escape power? Do it all the time up here, works perfect. Besides the RFM performance graph is just a guide

Cheers
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Old 11th Aug 2015, 08:10
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VF - Honoured indeed, keep the photo's coming as it brightens everyone's day.

Didn't say the guy was wrong my post was illustrating how offshore take off techniques can vary - we all survived after all but times have changed and your average offshore SLF expects procedures and check lists although who's to say its any safer ?

Happy landings and mind that tail !

B.G
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Old 11th Aug 2015, 11:16
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VL, I have read that over a few times, it is simplistic but doesn't cause me any great shock. I agree, use the operators techniques, if you don't, you won't last long in the company. The problem with deviation from manufacturers advice comes after an accident/incident. If your company is using different profiles, that is their get out of jail free card.
Have you considered actually feeding back data to the makers? You never know, they might change the advice given
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Old 11th Aug 2015, 14:25
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Wink

G'day bladegrabber ~ Yaar a guess procedurally You guys are inundated & fly the numbers ticked off for that mission (makes for an easier, safer workload) Landing at 23,000' You gotta make it up along the way & use a short final power check to be sure.....to be sure given the chance I'd be doing what Your doing......just gimme that chance

Last edited by Vertical Freedom; 11th Aug 2015 at 14:56.
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