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Drones - the future

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Drones - the future

Old 2nd Dec 2013, 19:33
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Drones - the future

With developments in autonomous flight, and one eye on the tragic events in Glasgow, are drones likely to be the future direction of aerial surveillance in the domestic environment?

Current FAA/CAA controls heavily restrict usage to the point of irrelevance. I recently had a demo of a large electric six motor drone, which got airborne in a 30kt wind, and downlinked infra red as well as HD TV. However, when I would really want to use it, at night, possibly beyond visual range, to carry out an area search for a high risk missing person - I can't.

There is development to take place, but look at the Camcopter S100 System - Schiebel £ 300k, and an all up weight of 250lbs. Running a reliable turbine, these things can be up for six hours. Although it would still leave a dent, it wouldn't be quite as catastrophic in the event of a failure.

discuss?
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Old 2nd Dec 2013, 19:54
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I believe drones will be a part of our future.

Their capabilities will, like most technologies, constantly advance and as this occurs their proliferation will be ensured by that most influential of considerations, cost!

Don't be surprised if 20 years from now someone sitting in a police control room clicks on a specific map location then selects "Deploy Drone". The device will be able to self-navigate using built-in GPS, conduct preset as well as customised aerial patterns and will have the ability to record and relay (in real time) sound and video (both infrared and thermal) and no doubt much much more.

In terms of device malfunction, when something is sensed which might result in a catastrophic breakdown, the drone will simply deploy a parachute which, although unable to guarantee nil damage, will certainly lessen the blow.
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Old 3rd Dec 2013, 11:22
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The Schiebel system killed its operator in South Korea two years ago.
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Old 3rd Dec 2013, 11:35
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Amazon evaluates drones for delivery of small parcels

Drones are on the inmarch into everyday life ... until public (and specially urban) airspace becomes jammed up with all kinds of utility drones - what then ? GPS doesn't equate to collision-avoidance, am I wrong ? :

Des mini-drones pour acheminer les commandes chez les clients d'Amazon - high-tech - Actualités sur orange.fr
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Old 3rd Dec 2013, 15:32
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Amazon said (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-25180906): "from a technology point of view, we'll be ready to enter commercial operations as soon as the necessary regulations are in place."

Yeah, maybe if the regulations come into place in 20 years from now. I really
don't believe this system could work autonomously. Collision of the drones
with each other could be easily avoided by some technical system but what about
picking a landing site, landing there without hitting thin wires or people and then ringing the door bell? Or will the drone drop the payload on the pavement so anybody can pick it up? It could maybe work if the customer would pick a safe landing site in his garden or so, but that would require customers to stay under a certain stupidity threshold in order to prevent drone loss
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Old 3rd Dec 2013, 15:52
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Hmm, not convinced...

Nice marketing stunt by Amazon. Maybe fun for the comnpany execs to thorw money at, but not convinced it will become reality anytime soon. For UAVs safety is everything; if any possible failure mode results in human injury or death then it is not acceptable. GPS is not a panacea; if it is used for safety critical flightpath control then it needs to be redundant, i.e. more than one receiver and it also needs receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM).

Imagine multitudes of these things flying down a street near you; it would be a disaster waiting to happen. What if one fails and then collides with another one, or several? Could it be absolutely guaranteed that they would stay away from airports and avoid people? I doubt it. Therefore, although the technology is fun and exciting, I would suspect the relevant regulatory bodies will make it almost impossible for such UAVs to operate in public airspace anytime soon.
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Old 4th Dec 2013, 06:31
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Time for Drones

Hi
As I read in a previous post it looks that Drones will do patrol, filming and observation flights over cities, and helicopters only when pax are needed onboard, Hems, Offshore and SAR.
Police surveillance Helicopters over cities are closer to an end.


We need drone aircraft, says police chief - Telegraph
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Old 4th Dec 2013, 10:03
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You read my mind Sir.
Police helicopters cost to much to run and the bean counters are always looking for savings, plus with SMS I am sure that it will end soon too.
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Old 4th Dec 2013, 11:20
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Wink

Hey GF, that exact mission profile you outlined can be done by hobby-grade equipment right now. The only tricky bit would be the 'one-click on a map' thing I reckon - and all that would take is some software whizz to make a program to convert map clicks into lat/long data for the flight controller.
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Old 4th Dec 2013, 11:44
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and all that would take is some software whizz to make a program to convert map clicks into lat/long data for the flight controller
That's already commercially available.
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Old 4th Dec 2013, 12:00
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Sikorsky did that with their Cypher UAV in the mid 90's.
Bryan
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Old 4th Dec 2013, 14:22
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UAV / UAS / Drones and the Future

Guys and Gals,

Drones are here today and here to stay, all we have to wait for is the technology to catch up with the need and the regulation to catch up with the technology.

The Amazon announcement was nothing more than a way of them getting millions of $ free advertising the days before Black Friday and Cyber Monday, especially when people like Google have been looking at this for months.

Before any of this can happen there will need to be the development of a UAV style active avoidance system that will have to be maintained by the NATs of each country and be based on an agreed standard ala IFF but more like AIS in the marine world, otherwise the sky would chaos with Googles drones taking our Amazons drones and the military drones taking them all out......

Secondly todays GPS, even the military version is no where near accurate enough to guarantee the Amazon book gets delivered to house number 1 and not number2 so there will need to be some form of additional drone based ground / map recognition system to say "OK you are on top of the house co-ordinates, now use place recognition to land in the right spot.

Meanwhile we still need to evolve from the 15/20 min endurance that 90% of multi rotors have to at least 1 hour if not more, this is close as brushless motor tech is changing daily as is battery tech.

How do I know this, well I fly multi rotor UAV's commercially our main machines being Octocopters and Hexacopters and most of what you have alluded to on the thread I do daily and try (try being the operative word) to make money from it.
Gary
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Old 5th Dec 2013, 10:11
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ProxDynamics' Black Hornet

Hi Gary, welcome to the Party ! As a professional in the drone business (paparazzi ?), how do you evaluate the 'nanocopter' ?

Black Hornet PRS - et norsk teknisk vidunder ? - Flyprat
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Old 5th Dec 2013, 10:41
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Nano

I love the nano and would love to get my hands on one to play with.

The problem is that they are sooooolight that any breeze or wind and they are hard to keep in the air.

-G
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Old 5th Dec 2013, 11:16
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Gary,
Your comment about Military GPS is a tad incorrect, my boy was using that in the Sandpit 3 years ago to drop MLRS right into areas no bigger that a carport,

Peter R-B
Lancashire
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Old 5th Dec 2013, 12:54
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When I grow up I'm going be rich because I'm going to become a UAV Pilot... wait for it... Prosecutor.

The hacks (and to some extent even the professionals) are giving UAVs a bad rap by ignoring some of our fundamental existential imperatives.

Should your UAV, home built or otherwise, hit granny on her way to the market, or film sexy Linda sunbathing naked, or be caught stalking your ex-girlfirend, or just be a dangerous nuisance, then I should be able to make a nice little earner out of it.

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Old 6th Dec 2013, 09:30
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he Schiebel system killed its operator in South Korea two years ago.
Apparently it was a trainee or novice operator at the controls and the drone made a direct hit into the control van, resulting in a fire.
There have been numerous other injuries to the public by RC category aircraft.

Whereas remarkably, no member of the public has been seriously hurt or killed during the 150 or so media and news shoot accidents where comparably far larger craft come to grief.
Based on this evidence, having a pilot at the controls is a safer option for the public albeit at the cost of those onboard who perish or who are seriously injured.



Mickjoebill
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Old 6th Dec 2013, 16:23
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Amazon drones

Here is Waterstones response to Amazon drones....



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Old 7th Dec 2013, 12:49
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I like Waterstones organic approach, as has been noted the Amazon/Google stuff is a mix of advertising, promotion of "aren't we clever" form and companies willing to spend on R&D.

The drone thing is going to happen on a wider scale for delivering stuff/assassination/surveillance/surveying, it's more of a question of when and how society deals with the shift.
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Old 7th Dec 2013, 16:18
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Originally Posted by cattletruck
When I grow up I'm going be rich because I'm going to become a UAV Pilot... wait for it... Prosecutor.

The hacks (and to some extent even the professionals) are giving UAVs a bad rap by ignoring some of our fundamental existential imperatives.

Should your UAV, home built or otherwise, hit granny on her way to the market, or film sexy Linda sunbathing naked, or be caught stalking your ex-girlfirend, or just be a dangerous nuisance, then I should be able to make a nice little earner out of it.
Ah, imagine a World without lawyers.



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