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Helicopter commander in court for allegedly breaking rules

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Helicopter commander in court for allegedly breaking rules

Old 31st Dec 2010, 08:35
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Helicopter commander in court for allegedly breaking rules

From the Maidenhead Advertiser here


A helicopter commander is due in court accused of breaking flying regulations.

Vincent Campion, of Rogers Platt, Waltham St Lawrence, is charged with being the commander of a chopper which flew closer than 500ft to a person, structure, vehicle or vessel without the permission in writing of the Civil Aviation Authority.

The incident on April 14 involved a Robinson R44 helicopter which had earlier taken off from Sherburnin-Elmet, near Leeds. Evidence relating to the case is due to be presented at Maidenhead Magistratesí Court on January 7.
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Old 31st Dec 2010, 10:19
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Maybe he was on a long approach to land?
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Old 31st Dec 2010, 10:20
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Here's a relevant link:

http://www.caa.co.uk/docs/503/Prosec...rch%202010.pdf

(See page 2).

The CAA do not remove a pilot's licence for breaking the rules.
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Old 31st Dec 2010, 11:55
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Lightbulb

If convicted of an offence, a pilot can be punished by the Court - and only by the Court.
The punishments available do not include any orders in relaton to the pilot's licence.

The CAA cannot and should not take licensing action in order to punish the licence holder. (Punishment is for the court to decide.) However, the CAA may take licensing action (revocation, suspension etc) if the conduct of the pilot is such that he/she does not meet the criteria for holding such a licence.

The CAA does not normally take licensing action - for the good and sensible reason that the fact that a pilot has broken an aviation law/regulation does not of itself mean that he/she is unfit to hold a licence.

FL
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Old 31st Dec 2010, 13:32
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Prosecutions for low flying are extremely rare. It goes on all the time and you're very very unluckly if someone has accurate measuring equipment, or you do it over a large group of people, then phone up the CAA and confess!

http://www.pprune.org/rotorheads/272...sy-uk-caa.html
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Old 31st Dec 2010, 15:14
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The CAA does not normally take licensing action - for the good and sensible reason that the fact that a pilot has broken an aviation law/regulation does not of itself mean that he/she is unfit to hold a licence.
And by removing the "offender"s licence, they would be removing the right to work and the means to pay the fine!
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Old 31st Dec 2010, 15:43
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I note that the sub-heading in the thread adds the word "allegedly".



So does the main heading now.
Thanks for pointing out the error.
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Old 31st Dec 2010, 17:29
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The headline and content in the news report that started this thread is even more specific but nothing illegal I guess, something to do with freedom of the press - but do we really need to know all the detail this side of a trial? Still stops the speculation about who it is on PPRuNe I guess!

Certainly nothing as iffy as the recent news headlines and finger pointing content relating to the landlord who is the latest 'Christmas Day murder' suspect in Bristol.




Thread title changed.
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Old 31st Dec 2010, 17:56
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The thread title has now been changed.
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Old 1st Jan 2011, 19:55
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Anyone know what he is alleged to have done (in more detail....)

Joel



Even if you do, do not post allegations while there is a court case pending.
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Old 1st Jan 2011, 20:34
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It is very interesting that the main thrust of opinion about this is that the pilot in question should under no circumstances lose the privileges of his license.

The CAA cannot and should not take licensing action in order to punish the licence holder. (Punishment is for the court to decide.)
I suppose you should not take licensing action against a driver who drinks and drives or causes death through careless or dangerous driving. Perhaps the courts should have powers to remove the privileges of a licence granted by the CAA. They are after all privileges not rights.

What a strange attitude some pilots have toward the actions of their own kind, no matter what the misdemeanour.
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Old 1st Jan 2011, 20:58
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I would not have thought that low-flying is in the same league as causing death by dangerous driving; probably more akin to speeding for which drivers do not lose their licence unless it's habitual or excessive.

Cheers

Whirls
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Old 1st Jan 2011, 20:59
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FFF
you are liking a drunk driver that kills to a pilot who flew closer than 500 feet with out permission. That's [email protected]@cks. Would it make you happier if the pilot had permission? Would it make it any safer if the pilot paid his fee, got permission then didn't hurt anyone anyway?
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Old 1st Jan 2011, 21:11
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That low level weather abort recce for pylons and hazards must be acceptable surely???
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Old 1st Jan 2011, 22:58
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What a strange attitude some pilots have toward the actions of their own kind, no matter what the misdemeanour.
I don't see much strange attitude here, only knowledge of the facts from previous cases taken to court.
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Old 1st Jan 2011, 23:09
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I kind of agree with FFF. When we are granted a license we all agree to abide by the rules and regs, are we now saying that we can do what we like and still keep that license.
Maybe some sort of points system like driving licenses is called for.
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Old 1st Jan 2011, 23:14
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are we now saying that we can do what we like and still keep that license.
I don't think anyone here has said that, have they?
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Old 2nd Jan 2011, 00:23
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That is the implication.
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Old 2nd Jan 2011, 09:32
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No, that is not the implication just what you have chosen to infer. It can't be beyond the comprehension of any reasonably intelligent person to understand that there are degrees of offence and that a pure low-flying allegation is less severe than flying under the influence for example.

The main point being made here is that it is down to the court to decide punishment, not the CAA.

Cheers

Whirls
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Old 2nd Jan 2011, 09:45
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Many of you miss my point. I am not judging the case at hand but giving my views on a mind set that appears to be prevalent amongst fellow aviators, and more so the non professional/commercial ones at that.
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