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What's the definition of "PIC under supervision"?

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What's the definition of "PIC under supervision"?

Old 25th Jun 2019, 04:56
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Join Date: Oct 2013
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What's the definition of "PIC under supervision"?

Hi,
I fly 737 as a first officer.
In my company's logbook, there's a column named "PIC under supervision" but do not know what exactly it stands for.
If I fly as a co-pilot, and I takeoff and land the airplane, can I log this entry? What if the captain takeoff and I land the plane?
Please help me clarifying this entry.
joshuahsong is offline  
Old 25th Jun 2019, 07:17
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Join Date: Jun 2011
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More than one thread already discusses this - try this one

P1/P1S/PICUS/PUT etc


Or this one -

Time logging p1, p1s, PUT etc etc

Ant T is offline  
Old 2nd Jul 2019, 21:24
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Or, you know, check Part-fcl rather than other threads.

(b) Logging of time:

(1) PIC flight time:
(i) the holder of a licence may log as PIC time all of the flight time during which he or she is the PIC;
(ii) the applicant for or the holder of a pilot licence may log as PIC time all solo flight time, flight time as SPIC and flight time under supervision provided that such SPIC time and flight time under supervision are countersigned by the instructor;
(iii) the holder of an instructor certificate may log as PIC all flight time during which he or she acts as an instructor in an aircraft;
(iv) the holder of an examiner’s certificate may log as PIC all flight time during which he or she occupies a pilot’s seat and acts as an examiner in an aircraft;
(v) a co-pilot acting as PICUS on an aircraft on which more than one pilot is required under the type certification of the aircraft or as required by operational requirements provided that such PICUS time is countersigned by the PIC;
(vi) if the holder of a licence carries out a number of flights upon the same day returning on each occasion to the same place of departure and the interval between successive flights does not exceed 30 minutes, such series of flights may be recorded as a single entry.

(2) co-pilot flight time: the holder of a pilot licence occupying a pilot seat as co-pilot may log all flight time as co-pilot flight time on an aircraft on which more than one pilot is required under the type certification of the aircraft, or the regulations under which the flight is conducted;

(3) cruise relief co-pilot flight time: a cruise relief co-pilot may log all flight time as co-pilot when occupying a pilot’s seat;

(4) instruction time: a summary of all time logged by an applicant for a licence or rating as flight instruction, instrument flight instruction, instrument ground time, etc., may be logged if certified by the appropriately rated or authorised instructor from whom it was received;

(5) PICUS flight time: provided that the method of supervision is acceptable to the competent authority, a co-pilot may log as PIC flight time flown as PICUS when all the duties and functions of PIC on that flight were carried out in such a way that the intervention of the PIC in the interest of safety was not required.
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Old 2nd Jul 2019, 22:37
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The reason for PICUS is to allow an FO with less than 250 hours PIC to get an ATPL: A CPL requires 100 hours as PIC, whereas an ATPL requires 250 hours (ignoring the MPL route for the purposes of this explanation) which can be made up of a combination of PIC and PICUS.
The most PICUS you're likely to need is therefore 150 hours, logging any more than that is pointless and could even count against you if for example at interview an airline thought you were trying to pad your logbook with Jet "command" time, despite never having passed a command course or flown LHS.
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Old 5th Jul 2019, 09:18
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To add another question to this My company are now saying after guidance from the authority that PF and PM duties can be classed as PICUS for hours allocation for ATPL. The reason they say this is that there is nowhere in legislation that PIC time is defined as actually flying the airplane. I don't agree with this but I need evidence and cannot find anywhere the actual definition in EASA of Pilot in Command and that the duties require flying the airplane. Can anyone piont me to guidance within EASA?
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Old 5th Jul 2019, 12:16
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Originally Posted by bohpilot View Post
I don't agree with this but I need evidence
You won't find any. The PIC or PIC/us is agreed before the flight and has nothing to do with PF or PM
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Old 27th Jul 2019, 13:37
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Originally Posted by bohpilot View Post
... definition in EASA of Pilot in Command and that the duties require flying the airplane.
So you were thinking that a Captain stops being the Captain if they are not physically flying the aeroplane?!?
Forget about PF vs PM, what about visits to the restroom
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Old 27th Jul 2019, 14:36
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Explanation in EASA FCL about how to fill out the EASA standard logbook:

When an aircraft carries two or more pilots as members of the operating crew, one of them shall, before the flight commences, be designated by the operator as the aircraft PIC, according to operational requirements, who may delegate the conduct of the flight to another suitably qualified pilot.
Which quite clearly implies that the operator (airline) designates the PIC before the flight commences, and the PIC can delegate the actual flying to a suitable qualified pilot. That means that during a flight the PIC will remain PIC, even if he is sleeping in the bunk and two other pilots are flying the aircraft. (see FCL.050).

The definition of PIC in FCL.010 it says quite clearly as well that the PIC is designated:

"Pilot-in-command" (PIC) means the pilot designated as being in command and charged with the safe conduct of the flight.
So in our business, we as pilots do not decide who is PIC, except if we are a management pilot for the operator. Crewing in the name of the operator usually does.
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