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A Day in the life of a "Lo-Co" Pilot ...

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A Day in the life of a "Lo-Co" Pilot ...

Old 31st May 2006, 03:01
  #21 (permalink)  
Paxing All Over The World
 
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Thank you Pete, by the end of it, my jaw was hanging open. What must be important for outsiders (including managers and wannabees) is not that this happens every day but that you have to be ready for it on any day.

Sorry to trouble you with a question: Following the lack of tx on 121.5, you wrote, "We do so and I log the time, sector frequencies and circumstances to fill in an ASR due to PLOC." I gather there was an equipment failure? Please expand a little (when you are not boxing the ears of sundry airport personnel!)
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Old 31st May 2006, 17:33
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Fantastic insight.
Any other Pilots care to add a little something?
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Old 31st May 2006, 22:31
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Pilot Pete to write a book? Not a bad idea, if I remember correctly he posted stories about his training and the road to flying a jet, was very interesting.

Looking forward to more
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Old 31st May 2006, 23:22
  #24 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
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Originally Posted by Gunman returns
Bug-2 ,Bug -5 and the capt takes control.mmmm.
Perhaps you have misunderstood. I mentioned the differences on a windy day, this was not. We were on a non-precision approach, not lined up with the centreline and the speed 'trend' was decreasing and not being corrected. No response to a second challenge and I exercised my right to redeem the situation that I have signed my name against. It was either that or a go-around. Ultimately my call, thank you.
Just wait till you start flying the NG Pete.
That'll be the -NG that I flew the last three days then? You have misinterpreted and not been privvy to the full picture so I wouldn't expect you to be able to make a correct assessment of what was right/ wrong/ warranted or not. Good luck to you too sir.

PAXboy
I gather there was an equipment failure?
Not a failure as such. There are occurences of 'sleeping receivers' which seem to be happening more and more regularly these days and the CAA are trying to track them and pinpoint causes, hence the report. In order to be of use that report needs to be as full of detail as possible, so taking a note at the time makes it easier to remember exactly where you were, what level, which frequency you were on, how long it had been quiet etc etc etc. One we changed frequency we continued with normal communications using the same radio equipment. As for no comms on 121.5, I meant that no station was trying to contact us on this frequency as we had been listening out on that frequency (as is standard).

PP
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Old 1st Jun 2006, 08:52
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
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Hello Pilot Pete,

Very informative, very knowledgeable, excellent reading for those of us on our initial stages of training and initial stages of career, I know time is of essence and not always on your side but if you can keep this going once in awhile please do so, I for one would be very grateful and I'm sure others will too, maybe the moderator should make this a sticky for awhile if he sees fit for such action? I believe this should be essential reading for those just of us starting out to have an idea of what is really going on further up the ladder.

Once again, thanks.

Draven
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Old 1st Jun 2006, 14:55
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2006
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I'd like to add my thanks too PP. Great posts, well up to your usual standard.

Cheers!
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Old 1st Jun 2006, 16:19
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
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Great post PP. Showing my ignorance here - what is Bug?
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Old 1st Jun 2006, 23:51
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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many thanks Pilot Pete. a great read...twice! Would any cargo pilots or long haul pilots like to share their story?
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 00:25
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by A38lephant
Great post PP. Showing my ignorance here - what is Bug?
'Bug' is the target speed you're aiming to fly. The bug itself a little orange pointer on a Boeing with a conventional (clockwork) airspeed indicator or a magenta line with electronic instruments.

On final approach you're typically allowed a -5 or +10 knot margin, although in reality -0 or +5 is much more agreeable and Pilot Pete would probably get somewhat nervous with anything less that -1 or -2 near to the ground. If the speed is low, a hard landing is more likely because of a lack of elevator authority when the pilot flares by pulling back on the control column to cushion the touchdown. If the speed is high, the aircraft tends to 'float' along the runway during the landing manoeuvre before the landing gear touches down, using up valuable runway length in the process.
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 11:48
  #30 (permalink)  
 
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Longhaul

Inspired I have just written a long haul version. However on re reading, it will bore the pants off you and the style of writing is no way near the original.

Well done Pete.
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 12:10
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Dave Spart
If the speed is low, a hard landing is more likely because of a lack of elevator authority when the pilot flares by pulling back on the control column to cushion the touchdown.
I am not so sure on the 'lack of elevator authority', I thought it was more to do with the lack of lift being generated by the wings to support the weight (very simply put as the vector diagram would have a small component of lift coming from the engine thrust with the nose up). The elevator is still effective, it's just that you are going too slow and in order to balance it out; at a very slow speed you would need too much elevator (leading to the tail being too low and tailstrike) and lots more thrust.....I'm sure one of our techie friends will explain in Mr Boeing's language for those really interested.

PP
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 12:17
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by mr ripley
Inspired I have just written a long haul version. However on re reading, it will bore the pants off you and the style of writing is no way near the original.
Well done Pete.
Lets have a look
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 12:19
  #33 (permalink)  
 
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Go on mr ripley,
whip it out for the boys!
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 12:35
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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A Day in the life of a Long-ish Haul Pilot Part 1

As requested?

Day1
0915L report. Decide to stay in a hotel local to LHR as this is an early report for me and I am paranoid about being late for report whilst wanting to maximise rest. Happen to meet the Captain whilst waiting for the bus from the car park to our reporting centre. Drop off hold luggage then swipe in. One computer fails me but then I am able to print off the schedule and crew list, 2 pilots and 12 cabin crew. Captain rejoins me for a bit of brekky and a nice latte in the canteen before we assemble for briefing. I am going to operate, so I check the paperwork that is waiting for us in ops. We have 2 x computer flight plans, the filed flight plan, sig weather charts, TAFs and METARs combined in a brief with NOTAMS and notes on specific aircraft acceptable deficiencies (there are none). I then decide upon a fuel figure in consultation with the Captain. As there are no foreseen weather or ATC or other operational problems, I decide to take the computer calculated fuel.

Go through security to our transport and meet with the rest of the crew. However today there is no bus for our crew at the scheduled time and we have to wait 10-15 minutes for it to arrive. However it does give us a good opportunity to mix and chat with the cabin crew. Therefore get to the aircraft late, which is parked on a non jetty stand. I, as operating pilot, check the tech log and brief on any thing of note (there is nothing of note), send for the flight plan by datalink and do the walk round. Today we have a very good dispatcher who seems to have a handle on things. Meeting up again on the flight deck, we work through the checks from the Electronic Check List and obtain a clearance. Unfortunately approaching boarding time we are short of one passenger. Despite several calls they have not appeared. However as they have no hold baggage, we can go without delay. Everything comes together and despite the transport delays we are able to push on time for a short taxi to depart RW 27L. The departure runway is surprisingly quiet at this time in the morning; I suppose it is after the first wave of SH departures. However we are delayed with another company aircraft waiting for final loadsheet figures to be datalinked to the aircraft and then join a short queue of departing aircraft that all seem to require a DVR SID. While waiting we have a little chuckle as ATC keep mixing up Kuwait and Qatar call signs. We do take note that one is Airbus 340 as is probably going to be a slow climber ahead of us on a similar route to the Middle East.
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 12:36
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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A Day in the life of a Long-ish Haul Pilot Part 2

I hand fly the first part of the DVR 4G and decide to limit the acceleration to Flap 5 speed and Flaps to 5 to ensure we make the first turn without straying from the SIDs track. We level off at 6000 ft just above a cloud layer and enjoy the view. The SID and climb works out satisfactorily for us as we out climb then eventually overtake the noted aircraft. Routing takes us east across Europe before approaching Bahrain from the north. We take part in the CPDLC (datalink) trial with Maastricht ATC whilst in the relevant airspace before settling down to a routine of monitoring, communicating and planning climbs. I discover that the Captain has been on the aircraft for less time than me and I only started flying it Oct last year. A nice lunch is taken somewhere over Turkey and we are treated to great views of the Black Sea and Turkey itself. The weather remains CAVOK throughout the rest of the flight down to the Persian Gulf.

Handily we are able to check the D-ATIS (datalink ATIS) for arrival and plan on an ILS approach to RW30R at BAH. I brief the Captain and then he takes control to fly the descent and approach. We seem to be vectored behind a few locally based aircraft before being cleared for the approach. I take control at 1000ft agl and managed to squeeze a satisfactory and pleasing landing out of the Captain’s approach, deserving of a refreshing drink (don’t assume its alcohol). After a short taxi I park the aircraft on stand using a clever guidance system that gives precise information and instructions and wish that we had these at LHR. At the stand we say good bye to the cabin crew who are continuing to DOH, handover to a fresh team of pilots and make our way to the hotel. Just under 6hrs flying in nice weather, with a good crew and well looked after by the team in the front galley. It is now 1700 BST and 1900L in BAH. At this moment we have just over 24 hrs before we are due to fly again, our next task is BAH-DOH-BAH, no more than 20-30 mins each way.
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 13:03
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Nice job!!
Excuse my ignorance, but on the next leg BAH-DOH do you use the same aircraft for a 20-30 minute hop?
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 13:23
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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Oooo a 30 minute hop in a 777, does it still have a rocketship departure in the 40degree heat?

Out of interest, why doesn't the same fd crew take it on to DOH?
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 13:48
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Well I know which lifestyle I would prefer.

Kestrel - suspect it is due to flight duty period limitations.
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 14:25
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by The Greaser
Kestrel - suspect it is due to flight duty period limitations.
A locally agreed limitation rather than CAP371 I suspect!

PP
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Old 2nd Jun 2006, 14:35
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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I see, on a simlar note, does the same crew do Heathrow - Cairo - Heathrow in one day on the 777?
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