Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Wannabes Forums > Professional Pilot Training (includes ground studies)
Reload this Page >

Former US Airline Pilot No Longer Qualified - How to get back into it

Professional Pilot Training (includes ground studies) A forum for those on the steep path to that coveted professional licence. Whether studying for the written exams, training for the flight tests or building experience here's where you can hang out.

Former US Airline Pilot No Longer Qualified - How to get back into it

Old 13th Oct 2022, 12:02
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Berlin
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Former US Airline Pilot No Longer Qualified - How to get back into it

So back in the heydey (2006-2007), I was hired at a regional, as the high timer in my class, with about 550 hours. I moved to another regional that was on its way out, and long story short, I was furloughed in 2008 with 1300 TT.

Since then, I took the furlough as an opportunity to try my life in the office world. It worked out, I made good money, but I'm looking to recapture some quality of life now as my kids are starting to grow up.

But of course, the rules have now changed. Since I don't have 1500 hours, I'm back to being a "timebuilder" despite 750 hours or so of 121 time. Insult to injury, my university is on the reduced ATP minimums list, but I attended the program before they became 141 so I think I'm not eligible (would love to be told I'm wrong here)

So here I am soliciting ideas on my fastest but most reasonable path towards a major. Complicating things a bit, I'm presently living in Germany, though I intend to move back to the US sometime soon.

My thoughts are:
1) Pay out of pocket for 200 hours of flight time (yuck)
2) Go back to being a CFI for a while (double yuck)
3) Hope I can network myself into some corporate job (appealing but unlikely, and not likely to increase my TT very fast)
4) Convert to a EASA license and get a job at a carrier here? How plausible is this? Would I have to sit all the tests, would I be desired as a pilot with 1300 TT entirely in the US?
5) Any other ideas??

Thanks in advance everyone!
Nondescript is offline  
Old 13th Oct 2022, 13:11
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 3,074
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Nondescript,

You're very close to being regional bait. I'd hesitate to offer you specific advice about getting that needed 200 hours. But getting current in something and up to speed on the academic side of things (FAR's, AIM, Ops Specs, etc.) might be a first step.

Every regional has an email address where you can reach out to their recruiting/HR people. You might ask every one of them what they'd recommend for someone in your situation. You likely aren't the only person in that boat.

These days, they're sort of hurting for applicants and can't afford to blow off people who are "close" to being applicant material.

Good luck and keep the Peanut Gallery informed about how you make out.
bafanguy is offline  
Old 13th Oct 2022, 13:25
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 3,074
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
You might also try asking your questions on a more US-centric website like Jet Careers or Airline Pilot Central. Despite some of the uncivilized drivel found on these sites, you might get some specific advice.
bafanguy is offline  
Old 13th Oct 2022, 13:30
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Germany
Posts: 975
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
The good news is that the job market in the US is looking promising. I know a young lad who got on with a regional flying the CRJ only last year and has a promise of a captain's slot next year and then flow through to American mainline the year after, if all works out. The potential for fast progression is there for those who time it right. To answer your question about Europe I would say that whilst not impossible it requires a hard slog to pass the ATPL exams and the job market whilst improving looks nowhere as good as the US. 200 hours of 152 flying will cost you how much? Two minutes on the internet suggests a little over $20,000 and there are probably ways to reduce this. Every day counts a far as seniority is concerned and therefore career earnings. If you really want to do this I think you are in an excellent position to get a job with a regional upgrade to captain on what are now much improved terms and conditions. I think going straight to a major will be hard after 15 years break. But you could potentially be flying a regional jet early next year and earning about the same as a first officer at the majors the year after if you get a quick upgrade. I would strongly recommend getting on with it. My post crossed with BAfanguy who is closer to the action, but seems to be saying much the same.
lederhosen is offline  
Old 13th Oct 2022, 14:05
  #5 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2022
Location: Berlin
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks both. I took a peek at the European carrier payscales that I could find and it pretty much turned me off on those options. I'll take a peek around APC
Nondescript is offline  
Old 13th Oct 2022, 16:30
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 3,074
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
They aren't the greatest but look at PlaneSense and Cape Air. They'd get you back in the saddle in the USA:

https://planesense.com/careers/jobs/...first-officers


https://www.capeairpilots.com/requirements





bafanguy is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information

Copyright © 2023 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.