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ATPL Studying Tips

Old 17th Jan 2017, 18:19
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Join Date: Nov 2011
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ATPL Studying Tips

Hi All,

Just wanted some advise on methods people use to tackle the shear volume of material there is in the ATPL's please?

I no everyone learns differently. So reading taking notes but what about reviewing? Do people use flash cards or just re read the material?

Looking to start in the coming months so any tips would be appreciated.

Thanks
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Old 17th Jan 2017, 18:24
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Join Date: Nov 2000
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It has been found that, within two days, if it isn't reviewed, people remember less than 70% of any subject matter they have studied. By the end of the month, the figure falls to 40%. On the other hand, if it's looked over again within 2 days, then 7, you should be above the 70% level until the 28th day. Another review then should make it remain long-term. In fact, short and frequent bursts of study are more effective than one long one - the brain appears to like short "rests" to assimilate knowledge. Constant reviewing is the key, especially for a short time at the end of each day.

(Source: Ohio State University).
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Old 18th Jan 2017, 19:30
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Join Date: Mar 2016
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Each to their own I suppose, but there are definitely good and bad techniques. It will depend on what materials you are using, i.e whether you have books, or you're using a computer-based-training programme. Hopefully you're not just solely using question banks like some people do!

I agree with Paco, short, sharp bursts are a good way to go, with plenty of breaks. If you have books, I find that that summaries in the margins, written in your own words help you get the gist, and make things more memorable. Use plenty of colours, mnemonics, diagrams, etc to keep yourself interested. I don't remember the exact figures, but I seem to remember that you only retain around 10% of information from purely reading, to get that figure up you need to make things much more interesting!

Hope all goes well!
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Old 18th Jan 2017, 19:42
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Join Date: Dec 2015
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What would you think about doing the following method :
Each day:
- read a unit of knowledge in the books (about 80 pages)
- doing all the questions from the bank concerning this knowledge

In your opinion, would this enable lasting knowledge ?
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Old 18th Jan 2017, 20:38
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Join Date: May 2016
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I think it really depends on which topic you're studying.

For example, I find doing lots of questions for Gen Nav the most efficient method to understand where I'm doing well and where I'm struggling.

But for Met I find breaking down the sub-topics into bullet points the best way to absorb the information.

I'm studying with BGS and I find the progress tests at the end of each sub-topic very useful also.

Last edited by iFunFlyer; 18th Jan 2017 at 21:33.
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Old 19th Jan 2017, 11:11
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Join Date: Feb 2011
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There are two kinds of people:
1. Memorise the answer
2. Study you butt off


Let me start with saying, QB is a "must". I did my first module without a QB. Got 87%avg., but could be at 95% if I did use QB. QB is a great tool if you use it correctly.

EASA is still in the process of changing out questions, so STUDYING is your best friend. How you do it is up to you. Whatever works best for you.
For me - just listen to the instructor, do few exercises. Do QB for the topic and read more about subj., if I make many mistakes.

As for QB concerned, I would recommend Aviation Exams. The main reason is their explanation and comment section - a lot of good stuff there!


Another thing you might consider - donīt follow school syllabus. "Save" some subj. for later. Donīt do all the exams in 6 months, but safe MET/POF/GNAV (as an example) and do them 3-4 months after you finish your ground school.
You still have to study those subj. during the school. However, you may use fewer resources on them and concentrate mainly on the subj. you will have exams on.
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Old 23rd Jan 2017, 12:24
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THanks

Thanks for the replies.

Think I really need to stop over thinking the how to study it part. First things first need to make sure I have the intelligence to even get through the ATPL course. I have the Maths & Physics from Bristol so going to work through that as that is my biggest concern.

I hear 1 year is a good base line to complete the material modular? Is it best to follow the course or just study a subject at a time? I heard that bristol dips in to a subject then moves to another? So you could be doing Met 1 day then GNAV the next?
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Old 24th Jan 2017, 08:50
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Join Date: Aug 2013
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I was faced with the same problem seeing how my university days were a long time ago.

After 3 months of screwing the pooch, I looked at my time goals (going the modular route, BTW) and saw that I needed to study 1.5 hours a day and 8 on the weekend to finish when I wanted to. It is well documented in this forum that I did not make it in the time I wanted, but what worked for me is reading the material, making notes, and modifying the notes according to the QBs. Therfore, I had a summary for all subjects which was easy to review at any time. I also made a Excel file with the formulas for quick referral when I was travelling. One subject after the other and reviewing every once and a while worked for me.
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Old 24th Jan 2017, 10:27
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Join Date: Dec 2015
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cavok : I am trying to work a bit more than that.
My schedule is over 6 months.

I recently found out that I could not take all 6 exams (of my first series) on the same day, so due to professional reasons I might end up splitting my work in 4 series.. What a shame.

Could you please be adorable and send me your summaries for each subject ?
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Old 24th Jan 2017, 11:35
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Join Date: Feb 2011
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6 months is full-time study.
Thatīs what we did at our school. 8-17 in a classroom (5 days a week). Then study at home. And study all weekend.
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Old 24th Jan 2017, 16:56
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Join Date: Dec 2015
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That's basically what I'm doing.
Full time distance studying.
But thankfully I have much theoretical knowledge thanks to previous studies. (aero engineering)
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Old 31st Jan 2017, 10:09
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Originally Posted by cavok_flyer View Post
I was faced with the same problem seeing how my university days were a long time ago.

After 3 months of screwing the pooch, I looked at my time goals (going the modular route, BTW) and saw that I needed to study 1.5 hours a day and 8 on the weekend to finish when I wanted to. It is well documented in this forum that I did not make it in the time I wanted, but what worked for me is reading the material, making notes, and modifying the notes according to the QBs. Therfore, I had a summary for all subjects which was easy to review at any time. I also made a Excel file with the formulas for quick referral when I was travelling. One subject after the other and reviewing every once and a while worked for me.
Hi Cavok Flyer,

Any chance you can get me link to your posts please? I had a search but no joy wouldnt mind reading through that?

So were you averaging under 20 hours a week to complete it? How long did it take in the end?
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Old 31st Jan 2017, 10:11
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Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: uk
Posts: 50
Some great tips here thanks. Nice to hear how everyone else is doing it or done it.

On the exam front anyone no how ofter Bristol Ground school update there QB? Take it there material is updated automatically in the app when you sync up?

Who uses flashcards to remember stuff? Heard spaced repetition and practice tests are some of best study methods?

Thanks
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Old 1st Feb 2017, 05:44
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Join Date: Aug 2013
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Search is your friend

@Kevin31 Go to Search -> Advance Search and search in the threads area (upper right corner). cavok_flyer . It was more like 15 hours a week which would have made 650 - 82 (classroom time) = 38 weeks = 9 1/2 months PLUS the three months of doing too little, 1 year should have worked.

Due to career restrictions ie. excessive travel (120+ days/year, when I started it was only 30days/year), employer bankruptcy, and having to find a new job, my orginal plan of one year turned in to 36 months minus 5 days which means I just made it under wire! I am not an example of HOW to do it, but that if you work hard, you can do it!

My girlfriend was (and still is!!) an incredible support for me. No man is an island and without and supportive and stable private life at home, I never could have done it.
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