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Hour Building USA - (Master thread)

Old 20th Apr 2015, 21:30
  #141 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
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@RedBullGaveMeWings

Forgive me for the OT, but would you like to share more details on what you call
some good options up in the North
?
RunBoyRun is offline  
Old 21st Apr 2015, 14:13
  #142 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
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I don't remember the name of those places right now, but I suggest you give a look at sites like FlightSchoolDB or BestAviation, you may find schools in Oregon, Ohio, Minnesota and so on.
You do not need any visa for hour building, so you will have a lot of options to choose from. It doesn't have to be a flight school. An aircraft owner that rents his aircraft out is a good option too. If you can find one.
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Old 23rd Apr 2015, 23:07
  #143 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
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Originally Posted by RedBullGaveMeWings
I don't remember the name of those places right now, but I suggest you give a look at sites like FlightSchoolDB or BestAviation, you may find schools in Oregon, Ohio, Minnesota and so on.
Based on what factual knowledge?
Gomrath is offline  
Old 3rd May 2015, 01:37
  #144 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
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This is one of the places I was referring to:
Airplane Rental Duluth, MN Superior, WI - Superior Flying Services
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Old 15th May 2015, 10:11
  #145 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Ireland
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Hour building in the States

Hey Guys, apologies for asking a question that has probably been answered already.I'm heading to the states during the summer to build hours in a helicopter and am having trouble getting concrete information. My two questions are.
How long does it take to change an EASA license to an FAA one?
Do I need a M1 visa for hour building? Due to insurance requirements at the place that I'm renting the R22, a CFI will be with me on all my flights. Does this affect the visa situation. I'm pretty sure if the CFI wasn't there I wouldn't need an M1 visa.
Cheers in advance for any information.
Cu Chulainn is offline  
Old 15th May 2015, 16:30
  #146 (permalink)  
 
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You don't need to convert your EASA licence to FAA. There's a procedure you have to go through that would allow you to obtain a temporary FAA licence which is based on your EASA licence.
You do not need any visa for hour building, if the immigration agents ask you what you are up to, just tell them that you coming for a vacation and a tour on your own in the States. Better not mention the verb "to fly" though.
A safety pilot doesn't imply you are enrolled in a course.
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Old 16th May 2015, 11:09
  #147 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Ireland
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Thanks for the reply, How long does it take to change your licence to an FAA temporary one? It says on the FAA website that getting one take 45-90 days!! Surely it doesn't take that long???
Cu Chulainn is offline  
Old 17th May 2015, 13:24
  #148 (permalink)  
 
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I have always known that this was the the time it usally takes on average... The FAA would have to deal with your local authority. If it is Swedish or British it may take less than 40 days, if it is Greek or Italian... well good luck.
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Old 17th May 2015, 21:14
  #149 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
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Ok, cheers for the info.
Cu Chulainn is offline  
Old 19th May 2015, 22:55
  #150 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
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Originally Posted by RedBullGaveMeWings
Better not mention the verb "to fly" though.
Never a good idea to suggest that information be withheld from the CBP officer at the port of entry.
If they decide to search your bags and find flight relating material they will likely take a very dim view.
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Old 19th May 2015, 23:00
  #151 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
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Post

Cu Chulainn

As part of the process for obtaining a FAA certificate based on your current EASA license, you will need to undertake a Flight Review to ensure that you are up to the standard required. There is also a related ground review so you should get the current FAR/AIM and study it.
Are you current on the R22? it seems odd that the place that you are renting from won't allow you to go solo.
Having a CFI with you will increase your $ costs quite substantially. You will also need to get it clear as to who is actually PIC. The CFI won't be wanting to be a passenger and not gaining any hours in his own logbook.
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Old 20th May 2015, 10:02
  #152 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Ireland
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Thanks for replying,
I agree with you re; the visa stuff. I'm determined to get everything above board, The US immigration take a very dim view of any chancers and obviously I want to avoid that. It's just that Hour building falls into a gray area, I'm not under taking a course of study, I'm not gaining any certificate from what I'll be doing either in the states or anywhere else.
A mate of mine did fixed wing hour building in Florida in 2013 and they made him show his logbook at immigration because they didn't believe him, but once he had shown them it they left him off. He went in on the visa waiver program.
I'm 100% sure that I'm PIC. I'm rated on the R44 but thinking of doing the Robinson safety course in the R22 as preparation for hour building. It's the cheapest hourly rate by some distance.
Cu Chulainn is offline  
Old 23rd May 2015, 16:13
  #153 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Scotland
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You don't need a student VISA for hour building. I have done this many times (I have a FAA PPL based on EASA PPL). The BFR isnt training because it doesnt count as credit towards a certificate or qualification.

To avoid hassle at immigration I've refrained from saying I was there to hour build (which implies training) but instead said that I was there on vacation and that I intended to rent an aeroplane. Which I did. I went all over the north east on a grand tour with my family.

One final bit of advice. If you are in doubt get a lawyer to figure it out. If you get into trouble and then refer the judge to a bunch of unqualified people (in legal terms) talking crap online will not help you. If you got legal advice and it was bad you have comeback.
sleary is offline  
Old 26th May 2015, 15:23
  #154 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
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The only time a visa would be required for the Flight Review would be if the Instructor were to refuse to sign it off for whatever reason and further training were required to meet the US PTS standard.
If you are planning to do the Robinson Safety Course at the factory in Torrence, you need to get it booked as they fill up some months in advance. Current cost is around $450 for the course which includes 1 hour in the R22.
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Old 4th Jun 2015, 12:23
  #155 (permalink)  
BYR
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
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Does anyone know of a place where they allow you to rent a plane for several days and take it to another state?
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Old 6th Jun 2015, 22:42
  #156 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
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"The only time a visa would be required for the Flight Review would be if the Instructor were to refuse to sign it off for whatever reason and further training were required to meet the US PTS standard.
If you are planning to do the Robinson Safety Course at the factory in Torrence, you need to get it booked as they fill up some months in advance. Current cost is around $450 for the course which includes 1 hour in the R22."

Gomrath, are you 100% sure of this? BFR nor 61.57 are additional ratings/certificates, and training towards an acceptable Flight Review is not training towards a rating or certificate. Can you find any rulings/evidence to support your opinion?
dera is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 07:31
  #157 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Madhouse
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Nice machine or cheap metal?

Im thinking of buying my own light aircraft and leasing it out for hour building when I'm not using it to cover my costs.
I really like the DA40 but need to justify the cost!

A question for anyone who is looking to do some hour building in the future:
Would you rather rent an old 152 for $100 per hour, or a fully equipped glass DA40 for about $150?
SteamDials is offline  
Old 14th Jun 2015, 11:08
  #158 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sky
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C152 for $100, but that is just me.
captain.weird is offline  
Old 25th Jul 2015, 19:11
  #159 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Europe
Age: 54
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VISA NOT Required if you fail a flight review

A visa is ONLY required on a FULL TIME training course doing over 18hrs of flying a week.

If you intention is to go to the USA to rent an aircraft and fly then you do NOT need a visa.

If you were not up to speed and needed more flying then as long as you dont exceed the 18 hrs then your good.

Trust me I do this all the time for 61.75 flight reviews.
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Old 26th Jul 2015, 02:28
  #160 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
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dera,

Admission of nonimmigrants to the US under the B visa class (i.e. visitors, including those admitted under the visa waiver program) is conditional on the visit not being for the "purpose of study" [1] and a change of status is needed before a course of study can be started [2]. The US Department of Justice, in a memorandum to its regional directors issued in April 2002 [3], provides insight into its interpretation of "course of study":

Originally Posted by DOJ Memorandum, April 2002
"The term 'course of study' implies a focused program of classes, such as a full-time course load leading to a degree or, in the case of a vocational student, some type of certification. Casual, short-term classes that are not he primary purpose of the alien's presence in the United States, such as a single English language or crafts class, would not constitute a 'course of study.' Courses with more substance or that teach a potential vocation, such as flight training, would be considered part of a 'course of study' and thus would require approval of a student status."
In itself it is an unreasonable inference to state that a few hours' refresher flying constitute a "course of study." How does one distinguish between refresher training for its own sake, and training that is creditable toward a further qualification as for example in the case of a 61.75 holder seeking a standalone US private pilot certificate? In fact this problem of dual purpose isn't limited to US certification because training could be received from an instructor qualified as such only under a foreign authority, leading to the instructed person acquiring a foreign qualification. Such training cannot lead directly to a US airman certificate [4], yet thousands of EASA PPL holders have been trained under these circumstances in the United States and it would be wrong to view their training as anything but "courses of study."

Under the most conservative view any training received from any person in the US for any qualification purpose can be deemed a "course of study." If you want a more civilised form of tyranny try Canada.

[1] Immigration and Nationality Act 101(a)(15)(B).

[2] 8 CFR 248.1(c).

[3] Memorandum for Regional Directors, et al. Office of the Executive Associate Commissioner, US DOJ. April 12th, 2002. Available at: http://www.eandvh.com/engine/pubs/ge...spx?id=40&dl=1

[4] 14 CFR 61.41(a)(2).
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