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ATPL theory questions

Old 22nd May 2019, 16:49
  #1281 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: ireland
Posts: 2
Originally Posted by keith williams View Post
The total moment is given in inch lbs , so you must convert the 9 feet into inches.

9 feet is 108 inches.
great thanks for the help to check all the units!!
jay34 is offline  
Old 30th May 2019, 14:14
  #1282 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Mumbai
Posts: 1
Devil ILS RADIO NAVIGATION

The Oxford ATPL books have two different answers to the same questions.
The EASA FIRST EDITION REVISED FORNPA 29 states option D to be the right answer, wheras the previous editions show option B as the answer.
What exactly is the right answer??
PLEASE NEED HELP!

An aircraft is attempting to use an ILS approach outside the coverage sectors of an ICAO standard system:
a. from the glide slope needle the captain may be receiving false course and reverse sense indications and from the localizer needle intermittent and incorrect indications
b. the aircraftís receiver is not detecting any transmissions and the ILS needle OFF flags are visible
c. from the localizer needle the captain may be receiving false course and intermittent indications and from the glide slope needle reverse sense and incorrect indications
d. from the localizer needle the captain may be receiving false course and reverse sense indications and from the glide slope needle intermittent and incorrect indications
captainarjun is offline  
Old 31st May 2019, 20:31
  #1283 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Poland
Posts: 0
I am going to do my performance exam in between other exams in June session. Do anyone know how EASA was thinking about factorization in the ECQB5 newest exam questions because reading Aviation Exam explanations, looking in Bristol Groundschool online or anywhere else I can not find a straight answer.

Is it so that for example for a SEP graph when its written landing distance required we do factorize by 1,43 and if its written just landing distance we do not. Or is it so as other people say that only when the question ask to factorize that we do it ? Its really important because it would definitely not be fun to fail the exam because the question creator thought about something but forgot to tell us in the question what is being expected. This is going beyond knowing what to do and gets into guessing what the creator of the question really wanted. Because according to questionbanks its different from question to question and memorizing all the answers when you know how to use the graph..... that would be so unnecessary..... + there are new questions not included in the bank.
KT1988 is offline  
Old 1st Jun 2019, 12:40
  #1284 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: England
Posts: 642
KT1988

Landing Distance (LD) is the distance that you get out of the graph (assuming you do it right).

Landing Distance Required (LDR) is the distance you get after applying the various factors to the Landing Distance.

if you do an internet search for CAP698, you will get the workbook produced by the UK CAA. For many years students could take this into their exam, but this is no longer permitted. But the book explains a great deal about this subject, including how to use the graphs and how to do the calculations.

If you do an internet search for Difference between Landing Distance and Landing Distance Required, you will find lots of useful stuff on the subject.

keith williams is offline  
Old 1st Jun 2019, 13:03
  #1285 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Poland
Posts: 0
@keith williams: Thanks for the reply, I do understand the difference. The problem is what do EASA expect because people passing the exams in different nations in Europe come with different information.

In the question banks its the same sometimes it is LDR but correct answer is LD and sometimes the other way around.... some students claimed and Aviation Exam got it as a note that in Poland we should never factorize for B class SEP unless it is clearly written that it is a commercial flight and only then LDR shall be used.

Is it even possible that EASA give different answers for the same question in different nations, can the CAA make their own questions or are the questions made by EASA and there can only be one correct answer to a question with the same data provided ? Seriously it can fail the whole exam or at least the score depending on how many questions of this kind are drawn. So I do not know who to trust the answer in the questionbank or the feedback in Aviation Exam ? There should be one simple explanation like for example LDR means LDR or only factorize if its a commercial flight and disregard everything else.

Or else this is not an exam to check what the students do know but to check who is lucky (or who memorized all numbers in question bank in case the answers there are universal (they go both ways for the same wording).
KT1988 is offline  
Old 3rd Jun 2019, 06:16
  #1286 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Baile Atha Cliath
Posts: 15
KT1988

I feel your furstration, I'd the same worry so I just made a decision to factorise when they ask for LDR and not factorise when they asked for LD.

I then wrote a note to that effect in the comments box for each question where I did this.

As regards SEP thankfully they only asked for LD, not LDR so I hadn't got to make the SEP decision.



MR172 is offline  
Old 3rd Jun 2019, 10:57
  #1287 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Poland
Posts: 0
@MR172: Thanks for your reply, the point is I have not seen any comments box in the Polish CAA exam. You do the exam click that you are done and the PC immediately give you the result thats it. But I will do the Performance exam the last (got 3 sessions left after this session in case) so just in case it will not frustrate me for the other exams. And I will just remember the strange questions from question bank where they did not want factorized answer when asked about LDR and trust they got it right in question bank if I do not remember the question and answer (new question of this kind) then I do factorize if they ask LDR and hope for the best.
KT1988 is offline  
Old 7th Jun 2019, 17:06
  #1288 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Poland
Posts: 0
Here is another question in Performance without a clear answer what the CAA expects. Really it looks like the Performance exam got the strangest question creators from all the exams no other exam got so confusing expectations and we do still have to pass it on first try to get a first time pass.

The question is: Consider maximum range speed and speed for maximum angle of climb. How will headwind affect those speeds (everything else remain the same).

What seems the right answer is: Maximum range speed increases and speed for maximum angle of climb remains the same

BUT the correct answer according to comments and an another question bank is: Both speeds remain the same......

Do anyone know if EASA corrected the question or we shall answer both speeds remain the same to skip contesting the question etc. itd. ? Seriously this is totally strange that other exams got their questions in shape while in this one no one knows what the CAA expect and whether or not they care about what is correct by the book.
KT1988 is offline  
Old 7th Jun 2019, 19:27
  #1289 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1,284
KT1988 - Many question banks are very bad, and contain loads of errors. The only one I would trust would be the Bristol QB.
2unlimited is offline  
Old 7th Jun 2019, 20:42
  #1290 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Poland
Posts: 0
@2unlimited: Bristol today have got like 40 % real questions at most maybe and they got few questions too. I use it to check whether or not I can pass if I get all new questions since I train with Aviation Exam and Atpl questions. The real exam questions are much more like Aviation Exam and Atpl questions. And this is the question where both banks do not know what to advise. Aviation Exam got the correct answer but is not sure if CAAs did correct it, Atpl questions claim the wrong answer is what the CAAs mark as correct but that EASA was supposed to look at it in 2018.

I hope I will just not draw the question there are over 1000 questions including those new that the question banks do not know about yet, so drawing this one got to be really bad luck.
KT1988 is offline  
Old 24th Sep 2019, 21:05
  #1291 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2
Unhappy Airlaw Question that seems wrong?

Hi All,
In the Geoff Weighell Airlaw book, there is this question:

An Aircraft in the cruise on a magnetic track of 270 degrees in accordance with the WFR might choose to cruise at which of the following levels to avoid other aircraft:
A) FL45
B) FL40
C) FL35
D) FL30


I get it, but the answer seems wrong to me. Can anyone explain?
cmackay81 is offline  
Old 25th Sep 2019, 14:02
  #1292 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: France / UK
Age: 64
Posts: 925

From the CAA website:

Key changes resulting from the implementation of SERA include:

Cruising levels

The semi-circular level system replaces the quadrantal system and brings the UK into line with ICAO standards applied elsewhere around the world. VFR and IFR aircraft are allocated different levels to fly at:
  • IFR flights use whole 1000's of feet (e.g. 1000, 3000 etc. when flying eastbound, and 2000, 4000 etc. when flying westbound)
  • VFR flights use the intermediate 500 ft. levels (e.g. 3500, 5500 etc. when flying eastbound and 4500, 6500 when flying westbound)
For VFR flights, compliance with the cruising levels remains good practice but is not mandatory.

So, Iím guessing that the correct answer is A) FL45?
eckhard is offline  
Old 25th Sep 2019, 16:42
  #1293 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: Scotland
Posts: 2
Originally Posted by eckhard View Post

From the CAA website:

Key changes resulting from the implementation of SERA include:

Cruising levels

The semi-circular level system replaces the quadrantal system and brings the UK into line with ICAO standards applied elsewhere around the world. VFR and IFR aircraft are allocated different levels to fly at:
  • IFR flights use whole 1000's of feet (e.g. 1000, 3000 etc. when flying eastbound, and 2000, 4000 etc. when flying westbound)
  • VFR flights use the intermediate 500 ft. levels (e.g. 3500, 5500 etc. when flying eastbound and 4500, 6500 when flying westbound)
For VFR flights, compliance with the cruising levels remains good practice but is not mandatory.

So, Iím guessing that the correct answer is A) FL45?
Yes, that's what I thought as well. However the answer given in the book is FL35.

I e-mailed the author today, and he has confirmed the book is incorrect, so it should be FL45
cmackay81 is offline  
Old 8th Oct 2019, 09:14
  #1294 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Europe
Posts: 5
Good day everybody, I will start soon to study for ATPL(H) IR exams, any suggestion on which test-per question bank choose online ? I'll sit the exams in Italy so, from what I heard Bristol GS it's preferable for sitting the exams with CAA.

Thanks
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