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ATPL theory questions

Old 13th Mar 2013, 06:37
  #281 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: England
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You are missing the point of the question.

Vx is greater than Vs.
Vx is the speed at which angle of climb is best.
Vy is the speed at which rate of climb is best.
Vy is greater than Vx.

So our sped range is

Low speed...Vs.............Vx.............Vy...........High speed

In this question we are decelerating from Vy (at which ROC is best), through Vx (at which angle of climb is best) to Vs (at which we stall).

This will cause the angle of climb to increase (until we reach Vx) then to decrease (until we stall).
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Old 13th Mar 2013, 06:38
  #282 (permalink)  
 
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Stalls exam question right or wrong?

I think the AoA will increase continuously (decreasing rate ) up to the critical angle ,after which it reduces. Hence your answer should be C.
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Old 13th Mar 2013, 06:40
  #283 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
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I would have thought that C is correct

Angle will Increase and then Decrease.

As you depart from Vy best rate, your angle of climb will increase as you progress towards Vx best angle. Remember that best climb is achievable with maximum excess thrust available. As you increase your AoA beyond that towards the critical AoA your speed reduces towards the stall speed you are progressively increase profile and induced drag and your thrust available is being progressively used up to balance the drag consequently is no longer excess.

Or in more simple terms Vy........Vx.........VS

Best Angle will be achievable at VX, any movement away from it either increase or decrease in speed will reduce your angle of climb.

Last edited by Rithalic; 13th Mar 2013 at 07:20.
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Old 14th Mar 2013, 04:02
  #284 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
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Okay, so basically think simply and don't read to far into the question.

Cheers
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Old 14th Mar 2013, 08:24
  #285 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
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Okay, so basically think simply and don't read to far into the question.
In many questions that is certainly true.

But you also need to consider whether taking a really deep look will produce anything useful.

For example your statement that:

the stalling IAS with power on would be lower then the actual published Stall speed of the Aircraft

Is true, but this does not mean that:

the answer would have to be that the Angle would increase continously.
The best climb angle would still occur at Vx and Vx would still be between Vy and Vs. So the correct answer would still be "increase then decrease"

The fact that the power on stall speed would be a bit lower than the power off stall speed, would not change the answer. So there is nothing to be gained by spending much time considering this factor.

Last edited by keith williams; 14th Mar 2013 at 08:26.
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Old 15th Mar 2013, 01:53
  #286 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
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Atpl questions

Hi guys! I need your help asap! I am sitting ATPL exams studying from Obristol + aviation exam + e-atpl + aviationtire database. Although I study extremely hard from all these databases I have failed 3 times in air law. The questions of the exams in the local caa don't belong in any of the databases I study. Here I post some questions I copied in order someone to help me if you have found them in any database:


-ICAO organisation
The body of ICAO that considers and recommends modification to the Annexed of the Convention to the ICAO Council is the:
(answers)


-Internation Private Law
The Convention defining rules of the parties relating to the carriage of passengers, baggage and cargo and the liability of the carriers and extent of compensation for damage is the:
(answers)



-Certificate of airworthiness
Validity and renewal of airworthiness certificates shall be subject of the:
(answers)



-Classification of Airspace
Name the Class of Airspace with the following conditions and services:
IFR and VFR permitted.
Air traffic control service: all flights,
Separation: IFR from IFR
Traffic information: IFR receive traffic information in respect of VFR flights,
VFR receive traffic information in respect of all other flights:
(answers)

-Classification of Airspace
Name the Class of Airspace with the following conditions and services:
IFR and VFR permitted,
Air traffic control service: all flights,
Separation: IFR from IFR, IFR from VFR, VFR from IFR,
Traffic information: in respect of other VFR flights
(answers)


-Classification of Airspace
For an aerodrome in Controlled Airspace Class C
(answers)
Phantomas21 is offline  
Old 15th Mar 2013, 11:56
  #287 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
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What is the wavelength of an ILS signal?

Centimetric
Hectometric
Metric
Decimetric

they've marked metric as correct but what about the glide slope signal which is decimetric?
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Old 15th Mar 2013, 14:09
  #288 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
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Yet another flawed and invented question.
Lightning Mate is offline  
Old 15th Mar 2013, 14:11
  #289 (permalink)  
 
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Thanks LM.
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Old 15th Mar 2013, 14:20
  #290 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 1999
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The ILS question was removed from the Central Question Bank about five years ago for just that reason. Have you seen it in an exam?
Alex Whittingham is offline  
Old 15th Mar 2013, 14:22
  #291 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
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its in some databases that are not meant to be updated till an elephant passes through a key hole
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Old 15th Mar 2013, 17:26
  #292 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
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Phantomas21:

-Classification of Airspace
Name the Class of Airspace with the following conditions and services:
IFR and VFR permitted.
Air traffic control service: all flights,
Separation: IFR from IFR
Traffic information: IFR receive traffic information in respect of VFR flights,
VFR receive traffic information in respect of all other flights:
(answers)
-Classification of Airspace
Name the Class of Airspace with the following conditions and services:
IFR and VFR permitted,
Air traffic control service: all flights,
Separation: IFR from IFR, IFR from VFR, VFR from IFR,
Traffic information: in respect of other VFR flights
(answers)
Controlled airspace can be class A, B, C, D, or E.
The right answer can't be class A, because VFR is not allowed in class A. Class A can be high-altitude airways and some terminal areas around large airports, like Schiphol.

class B airspace is more rare in Europe; it's like class A, but VFR is allowed. So highest security, everything seperated.

Class C airspace is typically a CTR around an airport: The ATC controller must separate all traffic exept VFR from VFR.
VFR traffic is supposed to see and avoid each other: However, all traffic in class C must maintain radio contact and have a flight plan, so the controller can see all traffic on his screen; and can provide traffic information from all existing traffic in his CTR on request.

Class D airspace: CTR's in Germany, for example, are often class D. The difference with class C is that the controller doesn't separate IFR from VFR either, only IFR from IFR.
In this type of CTR the Boeing on the ILS has to keep a lookout for VFR traffic if they are clear of cloud (in VMC).
But the controller can still give traffic info from all existing traffic on request or whenever he wants, depending on his workload. But he is not required to do so.

In Class E airspace, VFR traffic is not required to make radio contact, so a controller can never be sure that he knows where all traffic in his area is. Technically class E is only Controlled A/S for IFR traffic.

I hope this makes it clear that q.1 is class D, and q.2 class C.
Da-20 monkey is offline  
Old 16th Mar 2013, 23:08
  #293 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: London
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Phantomas21,

ICAO document 7300, a consolidated edition of the Convention on International Civil Aviation available from ICAO, answers your first question. Articles 54 & 57.

The Warsaw system of agreements addresses passenger, baggage and cargo liabilities. The principal instrument is the Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules relating to International Carriage by Air (Warsaw 1929) which has a number of amendments. A modern, but separate, agreement is the Convention for the Unification of Certain Rules for International Carriage by Air (Montreal 1999). You'll find more information on the ICAO Legal Affairs and External Relations Bureau treaty collection page.

ICAO Annex 8, Part II, 3.2 requires that "a Certificate of Airworthiness shall be renewed or shall remain valid, subject to the laws of the State of Registry [...]"

Da-20 Monkey has addressed two of your three airspace classification questions. The summary table for ATS airspace classes (services provided and flight requirements) is in Annex 11, Appendix 4. The text of the ICAO standards is provided in Chapter 2. Be aware that the EASA ATPL air law syllabus mainly deals with ICAO standards, recommended practices and procedures. Contracting States may have established differences in respect of the classification and flight requirements of, and the provision of services in, their airspaces.

The third airspace question is unclear. Perhaps you'd reword it?

Your EASA ATPL theory provider is required to maintain a copy of the ICAO Annexes should you wish to pursue the details further. Additionally, EUROCONTROL's SKYbrary has published an invaluable ICAO SARPS & PANS Search Centre where you can electronically search the Annexes and other ICAO documents.
selfin is offline  
Old 18th Mar 2013, 20:29
  #294 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: PK
Posts: 187
Hi

Q.1. The main advantage of a ratiometer type temperature indicator is that it:

carries out an independent measurement of the supply voltage <-- Marked Correct
can operate without an electrical power supply
is very accurate
is very simple

Q.2. A ratiometer:

Can measure independently supply voltage
Is very accurate <-- Marked Correct
Does not require a power supply
None of the above

Which one is correct?
Thanks
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Old 22nd Mar 2013, 17:56
  #295 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: in the mix muff
Age: 40
Posts: 172
I have this one if any can help:
A large cumulus cloud with a base of 2000 ft is reported at an airfield,if the surface temperature is 21 degrees celsius the height of the freezing level in the cloud is likely to be:

A) 10330 feet

B) 7000 feet

C) 10500 feet

D) 18000 feet

Any one please to help me resolve this one with explanations if possible

Best regards
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Old 22nd Mar 2013, 18:40
  #296 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: down south
Age: 73
Posts: 13,229
Here are a few questions from oxford school regarding instrumenation which,
actually, are not that hard but i prefer to ask for advise before submitting my
assessment.
Don't ask here - submit you answers and the school will respond.

The whole point of such questions is to see if you have correctly assimilated the information in the relevant section(s) of the notes.

You will never pass the ATPL exams by using the "experts" on this site.
Lightning Mate is offline  
Old 22nd Mar 2013, 19:35
  #297 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: In a remote jobless corner
Posts: 76
Code:
I have this one if any can help: A large cumulus cloud with a base of 2000 ft is reported at an airfield,if the surface temperature is 21 degrees celsius the height of the freezing level in the cloud is likely to be:
 A) 10330 feet
 B) 7000 feet
 C) 10500 feet
 D) 18000 feet


The freezing level in a cloud is calculated by using the the standard lapse rate 2celc./1000'. In your case however, the freezing level (i.e temp reaches 0 from the surface temp of 21 celcius ) at an altitude of 10,500' or 10,600 to be more precise .

The answer in my opinion would be (c) .
clearblueskyy is offline  
Old 22nd Mar 2013, 20:41
  #298 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: NL
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A large cumulus cloud with a base of 2000 ft is reported at an airfield,if the surface temperature is 21 degrees celsius the height of the freezing level in the cloud is likely to be:

A) 10330 feet

B) 7000 feet

C) 10500 feet

D) 18000 feet
The freezing level in a cloud is calculated by using the the standard lapse rate 2celc./1000'. In your case however, the freezing level (i.e temp reaches 0 from the surface temp of 21 celcius ) at an altitude of 10,500' or 10,600 to be more precise .

The answer in my opinion would be (c) .
If you use the DALR from the surface up to the cloud base (3 deg./ 1000ft)
and from there on 1.8 deg. / 1000ft as the SALR
(only valid in the cloud itself ) , you get 10,330 ft as the FZ LVL.

I believe this is the answer they are looking for, hence A.

Is this the answer they give?
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Old 26th Mar 2013, 16:38
  #299 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Cochin VOCI , India
Age: 31
Posts: 1,610
Hi

I would appreciate some help in explaining the answer to the following question

Q. A pilot wishes to turn right on to a northerly heading with 20 degree bank at a latitude of 40 degree North
Using a Direct reading Compass in order to achieve this he must stop the turn onto an approximate heading of

1) 330
2) 350
3) 030
4) 010

The correct answer is 330

Could someone care to explain as to how this answer is calculated

Thanks in advance
cyrilroy21 is offline  
Old 26th Mar 2013, 17:04
  #300 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: down south
Age: 73
Posts: 13,229
Your quoted question is not as per the original.

It says:

Turning right through ninety degrees on to north at rate two.......

Mind you, it might now have been changed.

The seemples way to remember it:

Turning through the nearest pole, roll out thirty degrees early.

Turning through the furthest pole, roll out twenty degrees late.

This takes into consideration acceleration/turning error and liquid swirl error.
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