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ATPL theory questions

Old 25th Jun 2017, 21:03
  #1121 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: France
Posts: 434
Hey,

Having just completed my 14th test a few days ago, I'd like to provide you with some feedback.
I started with a French School in mid december, so it took me a grand total of 6 months and one week. That's including the four total weeks I took to revise before sessions 1, 2 and 4.

My country does not seem to be willing to disclose your marks, but I had an average of about 95-96% with my school's final tests (they reused some questions from aviationexam and created some questions, to simulate new questions on the test day)

I spent half my time on the books and half my time on aviation exam.
This was done in parallel with my job, about 1 to 3 hours per day of work, every day during these six months.

About the subjects :
I started with :
Communications, air law, ops proc : just by heart learning, not so many new questions but they could be surprising since it's not easy to not miss anything.
Then, instruments, meteorology, perf and mass&balance : No idea if questions on test day were new or not because they could all be answered with reasoning. I like subjects like these.
Then AGK, PoF, flight planning. The latter two are like the four previous one : I liked them. However I feel AGK is the subject in which the level I reached is the weakest of all subjects : too many many systems and details to learn. Different type of fire detectors, seriously ?
To finish with, gen nav, radionav, human factors.
HF : easiest subject of all, took me 10 minutes to complete the test.
Gen nav : so many calculations, it makes me tired. Thankfully it's quite of an easy subject for an ex math-student like me.
Radionav : worst subject, by far. Many different themes and many new questions about ridiculous little details that no one cares about.. The subject in which I had the worst scores, immediately after having read the books. In the end I think I have a better command of this subject than AGK but it was a pain in the ass. Probably mostly because it was the last subject.

Now i'm on for some bureaucracy to get my official diploma.

I'm very glad it's over, I have no idea what I'm going to do with all the newly available free time.
KayPam is offline  
Old 28th Jun 2017, 21:05
  #1122 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Abuja
Posts: 11
Hello, I came across a difficult PSR/PNR question while writing SACAA IR Exams and I need your help. Twice infact and all were similar.

I was given a PET Distance of I think 1200nm and distance from point A- B of 2300 NM if I remember correctly. Total fuel was about 15000kg and that was all. No speeds or endurance was given or wind. I was then asked to calculate PSR from point A to B.
fly5N is offline  
Old 11th Jul 2017, 23:03
  #1123 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Earth
Posts: 71
Hi there

I started studying from the syllabus learning objectives, means that I learn specifically what they are willing us to know, line by line.
Do you think that's a good technique to pass the ATPL theory exams?! Or I should only study from my notes/books/cbt,... ?!
I am quite worry as the official exams are fastly coming up...

Cheers
Piloto Maluco is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2017, 06:13
  #1124 (permalink)  

 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: White Waltham, Prestwick & Calgary
Age: 67
Posts: 3,749
In that case you will learn to navigate before you know about Lat & Long......

Not a good idea that. The LOs were never meant to be a syllabus as such.
paco is offline  
Old 12th Jul 2017, 19:13
  #1125 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: East Sussex
Posts: 33
Hey Pacol, then why put LO's in? What's the point of covering LO's if they don't (at the very least) cover the syllabus? Can you point me to the syllabus per se? That way I won't have to worry about the LO's
delaneyslad is offline  
Old 13th Jul 2017, 05:50
  #1126 (permalink)  

 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: White Waltham, Prestwick & Calgary
Age: 67
Posts: 3,749
There are no syllabuses, that's the rub! They specify an LO, meaning what a student is expected to know after the studying then leave it up to the schools to guess to what level they should teach, thus creating their own syllabus. The only reference to levels or even sources of knowledge is in the question itself, which nobody should be able to see.
paco is offline  
Old 13th Jul 2017, 06:49
  #1127 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: eu
Posts: 31
Originally Posted by fly5N View Post
Hello, I came across a difficult PSR/PNR question while writing SACAA IR Exams and I need your help. Twice infact and all were similar.

I was given a PET Distance of I think 1200nm and distance from point A- B of 2300 NM if I remember correctly. Total fuel was about 15000kg and that was all. No speeds or endurance was given or wind. I was then asked to calculate PSR from point A to B.
Hello maybe I can contribute to the question because I had a similar one,

I got during my IR rating exam an interesting PSR\PNR question where I am going right now crazy to get to a solution. I asked now already everyone at flight schools, looked in different forums, but could not find an answer. I even asked already the authority, but they were not authorized to help me...

Hopefully you guys can help me here with a solution.

The question simple:
- distance A to B 2000NM
- TAS, wind, endurance constant
- 5000kg fuel (+500kg extra)
- PET from A 1200NM

what is the PNR\PSR?

answeres: I cant remember the values any more but for the approach process it should be not an issue. There were 5 answeres and I chose c.) which was 1200NM (same as PET and which is wrong).

My approach was the following, due to the fact that there are to less variables for calculations, no given fuel flow,..., it's more a theoretical question. TAS, wind, endurance are constant, so I thought it might be one of the rare cases where PET=PSR, which leads me to another question:
- Can PSR be equal PET and\or is PSR always more\less then PET?

I assume that when there is no wind and PET is exactly half of the distance, is there also PSR half of the distance or more\less?

In the example above I know I have headwind doe to the fact that PET is closer to B, so if PSR is maybe always more then PET then there might was only one answer which was more then 1200nm...

Or maybe I am completely wrong...,
anyways, appreciate your help in this case!
Rusty1983 is offline  
Old 13th Jul 2017, 06:58
  #1128 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: eu
Posts: 31
And maybe another question which is right now a little bit a pain in my ass, where even after discussion with mechanics I came to no solution.

Which TWO instruments are adversely affected by an electrical power failure in flight?:
A. ASI
B. Magn. compass
C. DI
D. AI
E. CDI

A and b definitely not. I would have chosen c,d,e but the question said TWO, and now i am strungling. The discussion with the mechanics ended up that it's c and d, but also a cdi could be affected depending on an old or new one...

So hopefully someone here knows the right answer and can explain why.

Appreciate it, thx
Rusty1983 is offline  
Old 13th Jul 2017, 12:19
  #1129 (permalink)  

 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: White Waltham, Prestwick & Calgary
Age: 67
Posts: 3,749
The compass is swung with all the electrics on, so if they fail, the deviation card will be inaccurate.
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Old 14th Jul 2017, 07:36
  #1130 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: eu
Posts: 31
Thx for this true statement, unfortunately helps not for the answer to the question.
Rusty1983 is offline  
Old 14th Jul 2017, 12:39
  #1131 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: UK
Posts: 455
IIRC, An AI can be either air driven or electrically driven so therefore is not entirely susceptible to a power failure. Is that the possible reasoning ?
WASALOADIE is offline  
Old 15th Jul 2017, 22:54
  #1132 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Oslo
Posts: 4
Starboard or Port drift?

Probably a super stupid question but how do you know if it's starboard or port drift? When you are calculating headings on the CRP 5 (chapter 8 Oxford ATPL navigation). Example: the heading is 060 and the track is 065 which means you have 5 degrees starboard drift. I understand how they got the 5 and all that. But how do I know if it's port or starboard? Any rules of thumb?
Sonbra is offline  
Old 16th Jul 2017, 06:29
  #1133 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Sunny Solihull
Age: 62
Posts: 204
Port & Starboard

There is no such thing as a stupid question Sonbre! Unless it's "what colour is the green navigation light"?

Anyway assuming you are using wind-down method (one reason it's used is it shows drift in the correct sense). Your heading will be at the top and your pencil dot will be usually be on the left or right hand side of the CRP5 centre line.

In your example heading of 060 is at the top and the pencil dot will be on the 5 degree right drift line. If it's on the right then this is starboard drift, if your pencil dot is on the left then this is port drift. Remember that wind ALWAYS blows from heading to track.

These phrases like several aviation ones date back to the days of sail, (like some of the dire questions) in the EASA exams they are more likely to use the phrases left or right drift.
RichardH is offline  
Old 16th Jul 2017, 16:56
  #1134 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: England
Posts: 642
Port means your left side and starboard means your right side. So in the example you have given, you are looking along your 060 heading, but actually moving in the direction 065. This means that you are drifting 5 degrees to your right (starboard) side.
keith williams is offline  
Old 17th Jul 2017, 11:10
  #1135 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: eu
Posts: 31
Originally Posted by WASALOADIE View Post
IIRC, An AI can be either air driven or electrically driven so therefore is not entirely susceptible to a power failure. Is that the possible reasoning ?
Which means the correct answeres would be the cdi and the di...but also not 100%sure.
I love it when the authorities give you not enough infos for solving a question.
Rusty1983 is offline  
Old 18th Jul 2017, 20:02
  #1136 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Bristol, England
Age: 60
Posts: 1,472
You have to love the examiners' simplicity, not specifying the type of aircraft. Or maybe they did and its not included in the feedback?

Which TWO instruments are adversely affected by an electrical power failure in flight?:
A. ASI
B. Magn. compass
C. DI
D. AI
E. CDI
On an aircraft like the older 747s with servo driven main instruments the answer is "all" but one has to assume something so I will assume they are talking about a light aircraft. On such an aircraft:
  • the ASI has no power supply, it is not affected
  • the direct reading magnetic compass has no power supply, but its reading is affected because the deviation correction is done with all power supplied, and therefore it may be incorrect if the electrical power fails. If the compass is remote reading it will require power and therefore be affected.
  • the DI is air driven
  • the AI is air driven
  • the CDI (if it has one) is powered

and therefore I would go for B and E.
Alex Whittingham is offline  
Old 19th Jul 2017, 09:15
  #1137 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: eu
Posts: 31
Thx for the feedback. No, the question is like its mentioned. There is nowhere an a\c type or heavy\light a\c,...

And you are right, found also some interesting stuff in inet:
Link: http://www.cfinotebook.net/notebook/...scopic-systems

With this in mind, the correct answers are:
Magnetic compass and CDI

And I was always so sure that the magn. Compass is definitely affected but that much that it could be adversely affected (only a few degrees but still working), but I think this is the reason why the authorities use these words. Only to trick you around and make you doubting your thoughts, even when they are right.

Last edited by Rusty1983; 22nd Jul 2017 at 08:59. Reason: I was wrong
Rusty1983 is offline  
Old 2nd Aug 2017, 17:18
  #1138 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: egll
Posts: 323
Can someone be so kind as to explain briefly the working principle behind spring tabs?

Also, would I be correct in saying that we have

External/Control Balance Tabs

- basic elevator tabs (controlled by a wheel/flick switch),
- Balance/Anti Balance tabs (not moved by pilot ... move with control surface)
- servo tabs
- spring tabs

Internal Balance Tabs

- control horns
- insert hinges


The above being all that is necessary for the ATPL (POF) ... this shouldn't be a difficult topic but it's something I'm slower to get to grips with than others. I have used the BGS ATP extensively but unfortunately some things are still not clear for me. Any help is appreciated
momo95 is offline  
Old 7th Aug 2017, 00:47
  #1139 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: N22 E114
Posts: 175
Need a minimum of 4 satellites for a 3d fix from GPS.
Latitude, Longitude, Altitude and Time all need to be determined.
whiskey1 is offline  
Old 12th Aug 2017, 16:21
  #1140 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Frankfurt am Main
Posts: 2
Hi,

can anyone help with this question please? :-)

An aircraft follows a true course of 140(T) for 1 hour 42 minutes between 45N 070W and 42N 062W. Calculate how much drift (and in what sense) will be observed on an uncorrected DGI.

Solution -24
vollkornbrot is offline  

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