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ATPL theory questions

Old 1st Apr 2017, 07:13
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In the first question, you have not been given any other barometric values, so it has to be A. It must be colder than ISA for your altimeter to overread. 4% for every 10 degrees of ISA deviation fits the ISA -20 C. No calculations are needed with a bit of exam technique.

The TAF question, I would say it's B. Where did you find these questions?
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Old 1st Apr 2017, 09:57
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Dear RedBullGaveMeWings

This is EASA ATPL questions
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Old 1st Apr 2017, 10:16
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Yeah I can see that, I actually meant to ask in which question bank you found them.
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Old 1st Apr 2017, 16:22
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I think the answer is (b) however answer is (a), Maybe am wrong, could some one explain ?
Q2; you are correct it must be b. It cannot be a. However there is no such group as BKN without height eg BKN005.

Suggest you find a better question bank!
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Old 1st Apr 2017, 18:50
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This question has been around for many years.

The original version included BKN005 and the correct answer is option B.
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Old 12th Apr 2017, 14:37
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What happens after leaving feedback on an exam question.

I had a question in Air Law asking what needs to be taken into consideration for an IFR flight. The options were all applicable so I chose one and left feedback.

I am not sure whether I got this correct or wrong. Do I get feedback on feedback?
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Old 12th Apr 2017, 17:44
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Were the options along the lines of weather, fuel, flight plan...?

I had the same question in flight planning when I sat my exams. Left feedback but my mark never changed so either I guessed correctly or they didn't read my feedback. Not sure how it works but I always said to other candidates always leave feedback on ambiguous or poorly written questions. The thinking being that the more who leave feedback the better the chances of a question being reviewed. Or so you would think...

I did have marks in two exams go up by a few percent so it does happen.

Some of the questions are a joke, though, and candidates shouldn't be having to flag poor questions up for review. Especially when you're forking out close to 70 quid just the sit the bloody things.
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Old 13th Apr 2017, 02:26
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Keeflyer is spot on, unless someone pays for a review , nothing happens, leave as many comments as you like nothing will happen
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Old 13th Apr 2017, 07:59
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Yes, that was the question.

I got a decent mark so it's not an issue, I was just curious what happens.

Sounds like its a bit of a waste of time.
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Old 21st Apr 2017, 15:11
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Post deleted. I have just realised where I was mistaken.
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Old 21st Apr 2017, 15:29
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OK now this one is weird...

Found on Aviation Exam, ID 26537

Given

Mach 0.80
Flight Level FL330
OAT: ISA+15

TAS is approximately (compressibility factor of 0.94):

A 265 kts
B 480 kts [this is what I get with formulas and CR-3)
C 420 kts
D 450 kts (marked correct)
Is it me or EASA?
Of course if I multiply 480 by 0.94 I get a approximately 450 kts... but it is not correct, is it?
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Old 21st Apr 2017, 16:01
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Not an expert but here goes...
I got a temperature of -36degrees Celsius which is 237 kelvin
38.95 x square root237
X . 8
X .95
= 450.91
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Old 21st Apr 2017, 16:04
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About aviation exam, 33 (flight planning)
Could anyone confirm that many questions (even types of question) are completely absent ?
For example, I saw no question about which route to choose between two waypoints, or what the distance and heading are between two waypoints of given coordinates.
Whereas I saw these questions in my school's final test.

Is it normal ?
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Old 21st Apr 2017, 17:12
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The temperature would be -66*, so if you set the Mach index arrow against that and look against 0.8 on the inner scale of the whizzie you should see 446 kts or so on the outer scale.

*33 x 2 = 66 -15 +15
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Old 21st Apr 2017, 17:21
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er, temperature is (+15) - 66 +15 = -36. I agree with KayPam, why would you apply compressibility?
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Old 21st Apr 2017, 17:27
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Originally Posted by paco
The temperature would be -66*, so if you set the Mach index arrow against that and look against 0.8 on the inner scale of the whizzie you should see 446 kts or so on the outer scale.

*33 x 2 = 66 -15 +15
It's ISA+15, not -15.
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Old 22nd Apr 2017, 05:41
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33000 feet at 2 per thousand feet = 66.

Starting at +15 on the surface means the temp should be -51, which is logical, given that it's supposed to be -56.5 at 36 090 feet.

But it's ISA +15 so add it back......

Looks like one of those questions where they include false information.

Last edited by paco; 22nd Apr 2017 at 05:52.
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Old 22nd Apr 2017, 07:33
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Err, doesn't ISA+15 mean that it is warmer by 15 degrees? I keep getting OAT -36 C which are 237 K.

LSS=38.95xsqrt237=approximately 600 kts
600x0.8=approximately 480 approximately.

Same with CR-3. It takes compressibility into account, doesn't it?
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Old 22nd Apr 2017, 12:02
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Duh, of course.... early morning is my excuse!

-36 it is, the CR3 (or CRP5) Mach index should take that into account. And you're right that makes nearly 480, using the Mach Index. But then, applying 0.94 takes you back to roughly 450, which I believe would be the wrong answer because they didn't include CAS in the stem. But who knows?

Last edited by paco; 22nd Apr 2017 at 12:17.
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Old 22nd Apr 2017, 12:05
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I think the question KayPam is asking is, why would you apply compressibilty? That correction comes between CAS and EAS, not TAS and Mach. Having found your TAS you would apply compressibility if you were working backwards to find CAS.
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