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Options for getting my flying privileges back?

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Options for getting my flying privileges back?

Old 23rd Jan 2021, 19:02
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Question Options for getting my flying privileges back?

Hi, I have a lapsed JAA PPL(SEP) first obtained in 1999/2000 and then lost due to medical reasons in 2003. Since then I've kept flying (P2 only) when able but never P1 - the same medical conditions prevented that. I'm much better now

Does anyone here know the future plans for the NPPL? Given my medical history, if that licence (or something similar) has a UK future I'm minded to go for that given the fairly straightforward medical qualification.

Also, does anyone know what hoops I need to jump through - written exams, oral, skills test - to go from what I have/had to an NPPL?

Thanks!

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Old 24th Jan 2021, 00:10
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CAP 804 part II: Section 5 Part A Appendix 1 Page 7. 856th page.
2.2 Pilots with expired licences or ratings
Credit shall be given for holders of expired CAA-issued Pilot Licences for Aeroplanes or
ratings as follows:
a) Where an SEP class rating included in such licences has expired by not more than 5
years, the licence holder shall hold a valid NPPL Medical Declaration or Part-MED
Class 1, 2 or LAPL medical certificate and pass the NPPL(A) GST in an SSEA.
b) Where an SEP class rating included in such licences has expired by more than
5 years, the licence holder shall undergo a course of SSEA refresher flying training
as specified by an FI(A) or CRI(SPA), hold a valid NPPL Medical Declaration or Part-
MED Class 1, 2 or LAPL medical certificate and pass the NPPL(A) GST in an SSEA.
The licence holder shall also pass an oral theoretical knowledge examination
conducted by the authorised examiner as part of the GST.

NOTE. Later this year the NPPL will not allow you to fly what used to be EASA aircraft - only non-EASA (once called Annex 1 aircraft). New terminology is UK Part 21 or Non-UK Part 21 aircraft.

Last edited by Jim59; 24th Jan 2021 at 14:59.
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Old 24th Jan 2021, 00:12
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Other option to consider is a LAPL(A). If you only want to fly motor gliders (TMGs) then another option is the SPL with TMG endorsement.
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Old 24th Jan 2021, 10:16
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NOTE. Later this year the NPPL will not allow you to fly what used to be EASA aircraft - only non-EASA (oce called Annex 1 aircraft). New terminology is UK Part 21 or Non-UK Part 21 aircraft.
Sadly, the case at the moment. However, I see no valid reason why the DfT/UKCAA shouldn't permit G-reg Part21 aircraft to be flown in UK airspace with a UK-issued licence, including a NPPL, on a medical declaration. Lack of willpower is the only thing holding them back, I believe.

TOO
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Old 24th Jan 2021, 11:11
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I see no valid reason why the DfT/UKCAA shouldn't permit G-reg Part21 aircraft to be flown in UK airspace with a UK-issued licence.........
Why such a restriction? Remember, there are no longer "EASA aircraft" registered in the UK. Subject to ICAO a UK registered aircraft may be flown anywhere in the world including the EU, when the pilot holds a UK ICAO compliant licence.

The OP can only be advised by an AME with regard to his medical history and current medical compliance. This advice needs to be obtained before any licence options can be considered. If all goes well and a Class 2 medical is regained then the expired JAA compliant licence will be reissued as a ICAO compliant UK PPL. There are too many ifs and buts until the medical is resolved.
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Old 24th Jan 2021, 11:25
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Are you well enough to get a Class 2 now, or if not a LAPL medical?
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Old 24th Jan 2021, 17:52
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when the pilot holds a UK ICAO compliant licence.
The problem is that the NPPL is a sub-ICAO licences and as such can only be used for flying 'Permit' aircraft. We've had a temporary exemption for the NPPL (which is different from a UK-issued PPL) but this expires this Spring. All I'm suggesting is that the CAA could extend this inefinitely.

TOO
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Old 24th Jan 2021, 18:01
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Originally Posted by TheOddOne View Post
The problem is that the NPPL is a sub-ICAO licences and as such can only be used for flying 'Permit' aircraft. We've had a temporary exemption for the NPPL (which is different from a UK-issued PPL) but this expires this Spring. All I'm suggesting is that the CAA could extend this inefinitely.

TOO
The NPPL could be used for CofA aeroplanes until EASA threw a protectionist hissy fit less than a year ago and started making everybody's lives difficult. The UK has now left EASA. This absurdity hasn't been fixed yet, but there's a good chance it will be.

G
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Old 25th Jan 2021, 08:27
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Am I missing something?

Training as required to renew the SEP rating. Then send the lot off and get the PPL issued. You could even do this on a medical declaration.
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Old 25th Jan 2021, 21:39
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Without a consultation with a AME the OP cannot know their options. Depending on the medical health, and possibly the history, a self declaration may not be possible. The same for any of the options. It is worth saying that most AMEs will happily discuss this with the OP in general terms on the telephone before undertaking an expensive medical.

As said the licensing procedure itself is straightforward. No one could expect after 10-15 years of inactivity not to undertake revision training. Finding an examiner will not be a problem in the UK. due to the way the CAA has appointed examiners over recent years: there could be more examiners appointed than there are pilots these days.
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Old 9th Feb 2021, 19:30
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Originally Posted by TheOddOne View Post
The problem is that the NPPL is a sub-ICAO licences and as such can only be used for flying 'Permit' aircraft. We've had a temporary exemption for the NPPL (which is different from a UK-issued PPL) but this expires this Spring.
Expired last year.
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