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Flying in France with a non-EU PPL

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Flying in France with a non-EU PPL

Old 13th May 2019, 15:14
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Question Flying in France with a non-EU PPL

Does anyone know if this is possible, or how to gain approval from DGCA?

I have a New Zealand PPL and wish to fly a G-reg from UK to France, I've jumped through the UK hoops (SRG2142) and can now fly on it for 28 days per year here, now I need to jump through the French ones but I can't even find anything about it... perhaps it's not possible at all?

Any help would be appreciated, I've searched the web far and wide and so far found nothing useful.

Cheers

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Old 14th May 2019, 11:53
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Here you go.
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Old 14th May 2019, 14:12
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Originally Posted by patowalker View Post
Here you go.
Beauty, thank you!

The only part I'm not sure about is the line "since the pilot wishes to make a flight in a private capacity (flights of leisure activities) on an aircraft registered in the French register" as I'd be flying G-reg. I've sent them an email
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Old 15th May 2019, 14:02
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That form seems to be what's needed to get a French PPL based on your New Zealand licence. I'm wondering if you would need that, as you already have organised a UK (or Part-FCL) PPL equivalent. Flying a G-reg aircraft to France on a Part-FCL licence would only require you to go through the normal flight planning steps and comply with customs and border crossing requirements. I think that you need to find out if your UK validation is usable in the UK only, or whether it will be accepted as a Part-FCL licence, in which case you can cross most EU borders without too much fuss. Keep a wary eye on the Brexit proceedings of course, as that may change things.
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Old 15th May 2019, 14:59
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Thanks Jhieminga - I was hoping that would be the case too, but according to UK CAA notice IN2017/029:

3.4 Should the holder of a Third Country licence wish to operate a G registered aircraft outside UK airspace, they have some options depending on the aircraft they wish to operate;

(a) for aircraft with an EASA Certificate of Airworthiness or EASA Permit to Fly, gain either an EASA Part-FCL licence appropriate to the privileges, classes and types of aircraft to be operated or a Validation of their Third Country licence.
So it seems I do need a validation from the French DGCA, in which case the form patowalker linked looks to be the right one
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Old 16th May 2019, 12:19
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Thanks, I think I've got an idea of the situation now. So you went through the verification process to get the details of your NZ license verified (SRG2142), you then submitted a declaration that allows you to use your NZ license for a maximum of 28 days (SRG2141). That declaration states that you "will be flying for for no more than 28 days per calendar year in UK Airspace on the basis of this declaration." That limits the scope of your flying I'm afraid. That same declaration also states that "I do not hold a validation issued under European Commission Regulation (EU) 1178/2011, Annex III, granted by the UnitedKingdom or any other Member State of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)." If you were to get a validation from France, you would not be complying with this statement. Also, as you mentioned, a validation from France would only allow you to fly F-registered aircraft.

The bit from IN2017/019 that you have highlighted is applicable, but I think it means that to fly a G-reg beyond UK airspace, you need to take a step beyond the declaration, and go for a validation of your NZ license, which uses SRG2139, and lets you fly a G-reg as if you were holding an EASA Part-FCL license. That will allow you to fly around the EU in a G-reg aircraft as far as I can tell, as it would remove the restriction within SRG2141 that limits you to UK airspace.

Another option would be to ask around if a UK based instructor would be willing to go along in the right seat. Not quite what you were after, but it would cut down on the paperwork
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Old 16th May 2019, 15:14
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Originally Posted by Jhieminga View Post
That same declaration also states that "I do not hold a validation issued under European Commission Regulation (EU) 1178/2011, Annex III, granted by the UnitedKingdom or any other Member State of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)." If you were to get a validation from France, you would not be complying with this statement. Also, as you mentioned, a validation from France would only allow you to fly F-registered aircraft.

The bit from IN2017/019 that you have highlighted is applicable, but I think it means that to fly a G-reg beyond UK airspace, you need to take a step beyond the declaration, and go for a validation of your NZ license, which uses SRG2139
Very good point, well caught!

Just took a look at SRG2139 and that is exactly the form I wish I had've submitted, instead of SRG2141/2 which was recommended by my FTO. It actually looks fairly similar in terms of paperwork - the only major difference being my checkride instructor would've needed to attach a PPL skill test report and I'd have to pay the CAA a processing fee of 216 (SRG2141 is/was free).

Sadly won't be worth it as I've only got a couple months left here

Thank you for your input nonetheless.

Originally Posted by Jhieminga View Post
Another option would be to ask around if a UK based instructor would be willing to go along in the right seat. Not quite what you were after, but it would cut down on the paperwork
Might have to be this. Or I'll just stick to British scenery
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